All Critics

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  1. Average review score: 49

    On average, this critic grades
    10 points lower than other critics.

  2. Ian Buckwalter

    117 Movies
    Average review score: 60

    On average, this critic grades
    0 points higher than other critics.

  3. Average review score: 67

    On average, this critic grades
    7 points higher than other critics.

  4. Average review score: 56

    On average, this critic grades
    4 points lower than other critics.

  5. Average review score: 61

    On average, this critic grades
    1 point higher than other critics.

  6. Average review score: 64

    On average, this critic grades
    5 points higher than other critics.

  7. Daniel Green

    11 Movies
    Average review score: 58

    On average, this critic grades
    2 points lower than other critics.

  8. Joe Walsh

    8 Movies
    Average review score: 60

    On average, this critic grades
    0 points higher than other critics.

  9. Average review score: 54

    On average, this critic grades
    5 points lower than other critics.

  10. Average review score: 52

    On average, this critic grades
    8 points lower than other critics.

  11. Average review score: 58

    On average, this critic grades
    2 points lower than other critics.

  12. Mary Pols

    221 Movies
    Average review score: 59

    On average, this critic grades
    0 points higher than other critics.

  13. Ken Fox

    1,706 Movies
    Average review score: 65

    On average, this critic grades
    5 points higher than other critics.

  14. Average review score: 43

    On average, this critic grades
    17 points lower than other critics.

  15. Average review score: 52

    On average, this critic grades
    8 points lower than other critics.

  16. Average review score: 58

    On average, this critic grades
    2 points lower than other critics.

  17. Average review score: 61

    On average, this critic grades
    2 points higher than other critics.

  18. Average review score: 60

    On average, this critic grades
    0 points higher than other critics.

  19. Average review score: 49

    On average, this critic grades
    11 points lower than other critics.

  20. Olly Richards

    107 Movies
    Average review score: 62

    On average, this critic grades
    2 points higher than other critics.

  21. Average review score: 66

    On average, this critic grades
    7 points higher than other critics.

  22. Average review score: 63

    On average, this critic grades
    3 points higher than other critics.

  23. Average review score: 50

    On average, this critic grades
    9 points lower than other critics.

  24. Average review score: 54

    On average, this critic grades
    5 points lower than other critics.

  25. Average review score: 38

    On average, this critic grades
    21 points lower than other critics.

  26. Robert Horton

    189 Movies
    Average review score: 52

    On average, this critic grades
    7 points lower than other critics.

Recent User Reviews

  1. Jul 12, 2014
    10
    Part of what's so incredible about Jafar Panahi as a filmmaker is that it seems like he's only getting increasingly audacious with each new challenge. I have no interest in trying to articulate in words the strange, wonderful, challenging directions the film takes in its journey, but it's an important one. The walls of the home he's imprisoned in seem to, mostly figuratively, come crashing down; the ideas imprisoned in his mind from his ban on filmmaking are freed to flourish. The blurred line where fiction ends and truth starts has been a preoccupation in Iranian literary tradition for centuries, and continued by directors like Panahi for years, but now the harsh limitations set on his ability to express himself more inventively in narrative and experimentally in aesthetic — having the unintended consequence of advancing the form further. The film would have been forgiven for seeming more heavy-handed than usual as it did in its first half, seeing as how the urgency of his situation might have even necessitated more bluntness, but by the end Jafar Panahi has utterly annihilated any semblance of conventionality, simple-mindedness or easiness. And, even setting his particular circumstances aside (though partly as a result of it), the final product is a staggering achievement. Full Review »
  2. Jul 12, 2014
    10
    For whatever reason, nuanced observations about the particularities of growing up in this generation has never really been captured honestly in modern film. Thankfully, Richard Linklater had been working on an entire film of it for twelve years.

    And although the approach of how this film was meticulously crafted makes for an intriguing initial selling point, it's about the furthest thing from your mind when watching BOYHOOD. What the method actually achieves is a richness of detail and passion that, in any given moment, can evoke melancholy, longing, love, laughter, regret, tears, smiles, and any other of the multitudes of words that come to mind in the experience of youth, and in reflection upon it. One doesn't even need to have grown up in a similar setting or time frame to Mason, our unsuspecting hero here. Regardless of the context of any of these characters' actions, it all feels like it's coming from a place of familiarity. Little looks, lines or cues will trigger your own achingly personal memories of the past — a fleeting time you wish you could do over again but would make the experience less beautiful. This is the most thorough immersion into another life seen in cinema since Satyajit Ray's APU TRILOGY (to me, the finest cinematic achievement in history).

    Through Mason's eyes, you can see plenty happening in the stories of girlhood, motherhood, and fatherhood unfolding around him. Patricia Arquette gives the marquee performance of the film as the young mother who grows away from the father of her children and takes on a string of abusive husbands as she tries to make life better for children. It's a common story for a lot of single mothers in this country in this day and age, but it's rare to see ANY female role of this depth and magnitude. It also bears mentioning that any of the narrative elements throughout the film that seem even perhaps OVERLY familiar — divorce, alcoholic father-figures, conservative stereotypes, peer pressure, whatever — have the effect in this film of only showcasing its sincerity more. There's a reason these elements are seen as cliche, and BOYHOOD does a remarkable job at grounding what are common American experiences in sense of truthfulness.

    I give this film five stars, rather easily, although I don't consider it a film without flaws. I think it was perfectly possible to trim the film a bit more, Mason himself is less likable in his later years and some scenes just worked for me better than others. But the film earns my full heart as all these things are in the service of a greater great. It's the intricate collection of 12 years of memories in carefully curated scenes, good and bad, happy or sad, significant or insignificant, that paint a picture of a life in a way. It's scattered, it's varied, it's precisely how we look at and feel our own lives over time and Richard Linklater has gotten closer to that in this film than any other filmmaker to date.
    Full Review »
  3. 6
    The movie was good. It wasn't the same as Wes Craven's film. But Aja really did a good job. The acting was decent which is why I rated this a 6. There was some parts I personally thought was fake especially Brenda's rape scene and one crying scene. As for Bobby, he really was great. I believed that all his parts were well acted. and believable. Especially at the scene seeing his father getting burned alive. **** kill those **** Nice!! The make-up was outstanding especially for Lizard and Ruby. But the only thing that was disappointing to me was that in the 1977 version, Ruby was a normal human being. Then the re-make showed her as all deformed which I thought was stupid. Other than that, Lizard was badass!! But damn, that make-up was just done well. I mean, it was done very well!! Full Review »
  4. This is a classic comedy that will go down in history as the greatest comedy of all time. It won the NACA challenge for greatest movie of all time, and anyone who sees it as anything else should stop watching movies. Full Review »
  5. 4
    Consensus: Hostel: Part II is excessively gory, stupid and pointless, torture porn as its best. 40/100 [D+]

    Three female college students
    take a detour from their partying, enticed by a beautiful European woman who promises seclusion, safety and maybe even romance. What they get is a living hell where they are sold to the highest bidder who's fondest wish is to kill them slowly. Hostel 2 also follows 2 American men who, on the flip side of the coin, are willing to pay to join an exclusive club where a life will end at their hands...any way they like. It's a story of human monsters and the almighty dollar as only Eli Roth could tell it.

    I actually did enjoy this horror film, but c'mon, it doesn't make any sense and the last act is utterly confusing. Hostel: Part II tries to be too many things at once and it's slow, very slow. Some characters are unbelievable and annoying, are they even humans?, The gory parts are enjoyable, exaggerated and crazy, the characters are so damn stupid, the camera work is Ok but the direction is pretentious and Careless. Eli Roth doesn't care about his characters at all, he just want them to die, he goes straight to the point, the ending is also stupid, though i enjoyed a few scenes in this movie, i can't recommend it, just watch the first installment, this second one is just bad. [D+] Check out my blog: www.memobosque.blogspot.mx Twitter: @MemoBosque
    Full Review »

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