For 182 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 40% higher than the average critic
  • 8% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Aaron Hillis' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 57
Highest review score: 100 The New World
Lowest review score: 0 Swearnet: The Movie
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 90 out of 182
  2. Negative: 50 out of 182
182 movie reviews
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Aaron Hillis
    Youssef Delara and Michael D. Olmos's variation on the too-familiar subgenre (the rising inner-city superstar here is a Latina tomboy) is more heartfelt, humanistic, and entertaining than such a clichéd showbiz cautionary tale has any right to be.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Aaron Hillis
    The performances are undeniably authentic, the cinematography could make Terrence Malick stand to give a slow clap, and sometimes a sensitive mood and evocative milieu are enough to sustain when there's barely a plot.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Aaron Hillis
    As the waves of this cinematic dream break, the profundities left behind come not from character arcs, but observed states of being that feel subjectively experienced.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Aaron Hillis
    Viko Nikci's undeniably poignant doc surprisingly chooses to follow threads of hope and forgiveness over the angers of injustice.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Aaron Hillis
    Too madcap or not self-serious enough to be called transgressive, Moritsugu's degenerate romp splits the tonal difference between Nick Zedd and John Waters.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Aaron Hillis
    A rich, artful quartet of shorts mirroring the diverse idiosyncrasies of four significant auteurs.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 63 Aaron Hillis
    De Niro is constantly upstaged by the showstopping, sunburnt duo of Streisand and Hoffman, but even their material is so recycled (more Focker puns, etc.) that it doesn’t matter who steals the most chuckles.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Aaron Hillis
    An enjoyable mess that aimlessly goofs like "Men in Black" when its script calls for "Black Adder."
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Aaron Hillis
    The Aristocrats lies halfway between two potentially great films: it's neither a smartly austere succession of jokesmiths with all the critique left to the audience, nor a deconstructionist essay on "crossing the line" and the language of comedy itself.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Aaron Hillis
    Has masterfully polished mechanics, some of the most seamless CGI effects in recent memory, and the Wells veneration is admirable. However, the film takes far too many creative shortcuts, like bookended narration and aliens that make strategically humanlike mistakes, completely incongruous to their technological superiority.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Aaron Hillis
    It may be a crowd-pleasing escapism, but it's that feel-good shmaltz that ultimately plays the film off-key.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Aaron Hillis
    It may not be saying much, but what keeps this movie afloat, aside from solid performances, is the nearly sophisticated dynamic of an otherwise redundant punchline.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Aaron Hillis
    The film stubbornly refuses to fill empty space with dialogue or adhere to any structure other than its own downbeat atmosphere, forcing viewers to be intensely patient or squirm. It's the best film I’ve seen in a while that I wouldn't recommend to anyone.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Aaron Hillis
    The Orphanage's joys come from the experiential: Bayona's cultured technical skills, including some phenomenal sound design, and sustained anxiety. It's about as healthy as junk food gets.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Aaron Hillis
    Dullaghan's film is a bit too straightforward and introductory to be declared a definitive portraiture. The gold nuggets worth sifting for lie in the anecdotal minutiae.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Aaron Hillis
    Van Sant has mastered this kind of driftingly contemplative imagery and his layered soundscapes would make Sonic Youth proud (of course, Kim Gordon makes an appearance), but the introduction of other characters fracture the film's greatest asset, its lonely first-person atmosphere.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Aaron Hillis
    Stylistically, Carandiru is definitely less monochromatic than an "Oz" rerun.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Aaron Hillis
    Underscored by the fragility of a plinking piano and well-timed flourishes to uplift, this heroic heartstring-tugger is still frequently and unexpectedly affecting, so much that it's able to hide its true face as a glorified movie-of-the-week.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Aaron Hillis
    DiG! never delves deep enough to act as a true cautionary tale. It's an amusingly drunken PBS-worthy human-interest doc, unless you're too old or not cool enough to have played in the embarrassing hipster zoo, in which case DiG! may be the closest you'll ever get to the uncaged animals.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Aaron Hillis
    The real top billing, what audience-goers are obviously shelling out to see, is the computer-generated chaos, and as they should: Digital technology has caught up with our collective imaginations Now More Than Ever.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Aaron Hillis
    For such a pedestrian exercise in Spielbergian sentiment, the somewhat stale Seabiscuit dunks into some gravy moments; the always dependable William H. Macy is three honks and six rattles of comic relief as the sound effects–happy, kooky radio reporter Tick Tock McGlaughlin, and the racing scenes themselves are spectacular.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Aaron Hillis
    Law owns every scene he’s in--which is literally all of them--plus a decent supporting cast and dapper dialogue truly make for a breezy good time.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Aaron Hillis
    It's an overall heady conceit about image and invention, clever and fun with compelling lead performances -- especially Reynolds, who finally gets to show some chops in a career littered with Van Wilder–grade junk.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Aaron Hillis
    Best appreciated as a rather amusing farce called The John Malkovich Show, the movie's every scene is anchored, then stolen, by the commanding thespian's Alan act.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Aaron Hillis
    Not bad for summer jollies, au contraire, but -- "Holy Raised Bar, Batman!" -- let's pray that the next installment measures up to the sequel summits of "Spider-Man 2" and "X2."
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Aaron Hillis
    Subtly gaining momentum as it dexterously glides through pages of good-time, snappy dialogue, Criminal offers no time to catch your breath, let alone enough to think through its reality-stretching story flaws and subtext-lacking motives.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Aaron Hillis
    Looks, feels, and tastes like a more accessible evolution of "Cremaster," so try to gauge your own tolerance for indulgent eccentricity (at 135 minutes, it could stand to lose 20).
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Aaron Hillis
    An unexpectedly retro throwback to '80s actioners and '90s hacker movies, totally preposterous in both its heroic near-death escapes and abstract tech-jargon explanations for how anyone with geeky inclinations can remotely override any computer system with a few easy keystrokes.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Aaron Hillis
    Aesthetically wild and otherwise mild.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Aaron Hillis
    Wisely unbiased-but also unfocused, uneducated, and underachieving-which makes for an occasionally hilarious, frequently anemic parody that misses its opportunity to permanently document a scathing critique of current events.

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