Alan Scherstuhl
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For 194 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 61% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Alan Scherstuhl's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Stand Clear of the Closing Doors
Lowest review score: 0 Saving Lincoln
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 19 out of 194
194 movie reviews
    • 57 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    The story's outline may be familiar, but its emphasis and quality are not.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    Porter's film is dramatic, unsettling, despairing, and in the end thrilling -- at some point, it grows from a portrait of this country's problems into a celebration of a possible solution.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    A genuine nail-biter, scrupulously made and fully involving, elemental in its simplicity.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    Demme has crafted yet another superb document of musicians at work, one as much about creation—and the sources of inspiration—as it is about performance. A wonderful film, as in, it's full of wonders.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    This stellar, incisive slice-of-life doc centers on the kind of crowd-pleasing competition story that lures in audiences and then lays bare heartsick truths about small-town America today.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    This is a film to see and then see again, to soak in and marvel at and -- like its director -- try to keep up with.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    Levinson follows the ups and downs of bringing that beast of a collider online, but the movie's deepest thrill lies in what these men and women will theorize next, and how they will test it.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    This film, a great one, demands a follow-up.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    Patient, observational film demands you surrender to it, that you keep your phone in your pocket, which means that movie theaters now sometimes offer a more unmediated look at the world than modern life itself.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    A pained and gorgeous summoning, Petra Costa's haunted doc Elena dances with death, memory, and family, seducing viewers and then breaking their hearts.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    The stirring new documentary The Case Against 8, showcasing the lawyers and plaintiffs who challenged California's 2008 gay marriage ban, is the best kind of popular history, a film that trembles with tears and hope, and I dare you to get through it without bawling some yourself.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film, while wrenching and audacious, is crafted with that humane and observational mastery of great Iranian cinema of recent decades.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    [A] strange, singular heartbreaker of a film about life still flourishing in the most inhospitable conditions.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    Vital, illuminating, and terrifying, Rory Kennedy's Last Days in Vietnam probes with clarity and thoroughness one moment of recent American history that has too long gone unreckoned with.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    The directors plant a camera in front of Roth and get him talking. To smooth over edits, they show us book covers and old photos—Roth was dashing, charming, a little dangerous, one of his college friends tells us, but she doesn't need to say it. It's manifest, and it's still true. The film is especially recommended to anyone who thinks they hate him.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Here's a movie with magic.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    With extraordinary access, Pahuja illuminates extraordinary conflicts and contradictions facing modern girls in a country even less ready for them than ours.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    A spare and ravishing doc.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    A marvelous film, stripped of false urgency.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    The Attack is most avowedly "about" terrorism. But that's a subject, not the subject. The film, an arresting and upsetting one, is also about love, trauma, and trust, both within one particular marriage and within entire cultures.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    The movie is revealing, wrenching, and important, a reminder that what feels wrong in our gut—the effort to turn free-roaming and unknowable beasts into caged vaudevillians—is always worth investigating.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Wise, warm, funny, open, and more interested in life as it's actually lived than any other to debut this summer.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Director James Ponsoldt gives us long, loose, single-shot courtship scenes, each a marvel of staging and performance.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Prince Avalanche reconciles Green's twin modes into a whole no other director could have, deeply felt and light as laughter.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    The final, moving, nerve-wracking reels are all sea, sky, and desperation.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Despite the poetry its subtitle promises, the fascinating crows-in-the-skyline doc Tokyo Waka is more informative than lyric, which is not at all a complaint.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    The key question is whether this procedural—as in, here we watch killers proceed—contributes to any greater understanding. I believe it does.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    A simple, solid, deeply affecting film.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    As a whole, Martha Shane and Lana Wilson's wrenching, humane film is as convincing a brief as I can imagine in favor of that most controversial of all pregnancy-terminating procedures.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Even if you know this history already, A.K.A. Doc Pomus is vital and endearing, a celebration of a great artist, a great character, and the universality of great pop.