Alan Scherstuhl

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For 666 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 58% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 39% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Alan Scherstuhl's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 In Transit
Lowest review score: 0 The Red Pill
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 42 out of 666
666 movie reviews
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Scherstuhl
    The movie comes to life, at times, especially in its detours.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Scherstuhl
    Honestly, I’d probably love this film’s wandering spirit and Elvis-is-everywhere philosophizing if it were half as fast or twice as long, if it pinned any thought down long enough to really TCB. Instead, it’s as scattered and disorienting as the infamous LP Having Fun With Elvis on Stage, an official cheapie that consisted of nothing but the King’s between-songs Seventies stage banter.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film is about being overwhelmed by Los Angeles, its sprawling indifference, but also about finding your place in it — and even, at times, its welcoming warmth.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Rather than epic or thrilling, justice becomes an errand, an extension of domestic work.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Lea Thompson’s first film as a director — a brisk, breezy, sharp-elbowed, sexually frank, occasionally shout-y, often hilarious comedy — stars the performer’s own daughters and plays like both a raucous family party and an urgently necessary corrective.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    As a work of sustained, thoughtful inquiry, Eating Animals is a bust; as a reminder of what we should all be thinking about, though, it’s searing. After seeing it, pretending not to know is impossible.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    As you might hope for a film with a script from the great Jules Feiffer, Dan Mirvish’s Bernard and Huey bristles with anxious, circuitous, hilarious talk.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    Simply put, the clockwork heist that Ocean’s 8 promises (and, by its end, dazzles with) limits the film’s ability to offer what you might actually want from it: the chance to relish this cast.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    Rather than plumb the apparent sociopathy that gripped these young men, Layton toys with unreliable narration and the vagaries of collective memory.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    The real Rodin imbued his clay with reverent, lusty life, while Doillon merely offers a buffet of nude day players.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Upgrade offers memorable, legible fights, a compelling bombed-out retro-apocalyptic look and a mystery that seems obvious at the start but then keeps twisting.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    Mary Shelley marshals its evidence without revealing more, without connecting to the soul of the matter. Its Mary Shelley may walk and talk, kiss and rage, but she has no more of the true spark of life than that specimen in that lab.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    As in many of his films, The Misandrists finds the oppressed themselves oppressing others, a warning among all the dizzy outrageousness.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Scherstuhl
    Howard stamps the material in some welcome ways: The scruffy breeziness of his early comedies (Night Shift, Splash, Gung Ho) suits the hit-and-miss script, by Lawrence and Jonathan Kasdan. Here’s a Star Wars that’s more appealing when its characters are chatting than when they’re pew-pewing.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    The conflicts Schrader exposes are too pressing, too raw, too obvious in their own right to demand subtlety. That makes First Reformed a fascinating work of almost mixed media: Ingmar Bergman and Robert Bresson meet outraged editorial cartooning meet the it-always-builds-to-violence pulp sensibility of the movie brats. The mix is volatile, enraging, entrancing.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Scherstuhl
    Rather than face its own moral incoherence, Deadpool 2 blinks.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Shuman’s sprightly, restless film trails the sprightly, restless WFMU host Clay Pigeon through the boroughs as he checks in with the people he meets.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    Onstage, we get to choose which face to regard, to watch each hard truth or unexamined lie crash against each character’s carefully maintained set of illusions. Here, we mostly see one face at a time. Those faces are grand enough that this Seagull still has much to recommend.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The relationship between image and music, here, proves more rich and rewarding than the movies generally offer today, as one is not clearly subordinate to the other.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    Revisiting Beast may prove more satisfying than just visiting once. The first time through, the film simply proves too successful at capturing the listless ennui it’s depicting.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    Fargeat is thoughtful about the elements of her genre, flagrant in her inversions of them but also ferocious in her commitment to them. She has an eye for landscape, a love of light — relish the infernal glare of the dust whenever a driver here hits the brakes at night — and an all-too-rare mastery of geography in an action scene.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film is less a distillation of the real Soussan’s memoir than a radical simplification of it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The Russos and the hundreds of craftspeople who worked on this film have dreamed up marvelous battles — especially the one where a motley assortment of heroes take their cracks at the purportedly unstoppable Thanos. But only once here did an intergalactic vista catch my breath the way a splash page in a Silver Surfer comic might.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    It’s stuck between earnest examination of a case and exploitative hustle — and is unlikely to please the audiences interested in either.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 20 Alan Scherstuhl
    The sequel is so profound a buzzkill they could sell it at GNC as a detox kit. No high can survive it. It slays fun dead, grinds cannabinoids to dust, and maybe even wipes the mind of the warmth you might hold for the original Super Troopers.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film — which is nowhere near as interesting as LaBeouf’s performance — is hopelessly reductive about its subjects’ psychology even as it mocks the press of 1980 for being reductive about its subjects’ psychology.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    This engaging and intelligent script could have been more of both if Beirut made room for the experience of anyone besides the Americans. The filmmakers do memorable work examining what it might take to solve this one particular crisis, but do too little examining the city itself. The title promises something the movie doesn’t deliver.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Scherstuhl
    ACORN and the Firestorm fumbles with the media story, offering cable-news talking heads in montage but not digging deeply into how the story spread — or why elected Democrats believed they had to shut Acorn down. That sense of fumbling shapes the film.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    Writer-director Haigh (Weekend, 45 Years) dashes expectations in almost every scene. Working from a novel by Willy Vlautin, Haigh has committed himself to making a boy-and-his-horse movie that’s scraped free of everything false or sentimental about the genre.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    As often in Russell’s films, Good Luck splits the interest between observer and observed, between the lives that Russell and crew capture in their painstaking long takes and the very process of composing and shooting those takes.

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