Alan Scherstuhl
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For 279 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 60% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 38% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Alan Scherstuhl's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Winter Sleep
Lowest review score: 0 Saving Lincoln
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 24 out of 279
279 movie reviews
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film is work, but it's upsetting, insightful, and sometimes gorgeous — admire its cold suns and withering cornfields.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The killing is bloody, the power struggles involving, the history-class examinations of the relations between mines and unions and gangsters fascinating, and the tough-guy routines, while sometimes tiresome, never less than credible.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Hart rants, Gad fidgets, and together this pair barrels through the plot, shaping between them a surprisingly potent friendship.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The movie's a fascinating mess, grand and gaudy, often hilarious.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    For all its piteousness, [it's] often moving, always well acted, and distinguished by rare stillness and beauty.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Even in its longueurs Young Bodies yields beauty and surprise, and there are inklings of some grand conception, even among scenes that feel haphazardly chosen.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    This material might be familiar to Frontline viewers and magazine readers, but Kenner's telling of the stories proves independently dramatic.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film's heart, like Randi's, is in the penetration of illusion, rather than its manufacture.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Augmenting his talking heads with animation and inspired stock footage, Gibney dignifies Hubbard with the capacity to conjure feelings of connection and magnificence, never losing sight of what brings people into the fold, which makes their attempts to escape it all the more harrowing. Still, the richness of detail of Wright's book is lost.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The suspense and pleasure of Justin Benson and Aaron Moorhead's talking-and-tentacles horror romance Spring lies in discovering what shape the film is going to take.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Informative and workmanlike, Antarctic Edge is more a bad-news rundown than one of the meditative masterpieces of the genre
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Misery Loves Comedy reveals artists adept at sounding out the darkest depths of our lives — and then transmuting what they find to laughter, a gift I bet sad young poets might ache for.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    This spiky, pushy, sometimes upsetting comedy finds Wiig creating something whole and alive out of her apparent contradictions.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    I like what I Am Big Bird is trying to do — I just wish it were a little less Bird-nice, and a little more Grouch-frank.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    Sometimes Citizen Hearst feels as breezy and electric as the newsreels Hearst pioneered; other times it feels like the video they'll make you watch during orientation on your first day at 300 West 57th.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    The good news: Here's a lavish, serious science-fiction picture, one that on occasion transcends big-budget hit-making convention to glance against grandeur...Which brings us to Tom Cruise, the not-necessarily-good news. However engaging its end-times mysteries, Oblivion is still a Tom Cruise movie.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    Mud
    It's too bad...that a movie so attuned to natural currents in the end gets caught up in Hollywood's impossible ones.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    Even if you've read the novel, and are prepared for the long running time and haphazard structure, this isn't a movie you should expect to feel or even closely follow. See it if Midnight's Children is a novel you always wanted the gist of.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    The initial scenes, thick with creep-show ambiance, promise more fulfilling madness than what actually transpires once the out-of-nowhere second guest reveals who she is.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    The photography is beautiful, the scenes of crowds and their signs arresting, and the interviews with individual protesters...are often inspiring.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film is admirably committed to simulating the messy experience of life as a real Maisie might live it. But sometimes, as she's tuckered out on her exquisite linens beneath gorgeous exposed brick and shelves of handcrafted toys, Maisie's world feels easier to admire than it is to worry over.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    The story and its violence are deeply silly, but there's something nervy and upsetting that distinguishes the film's incidental excitement.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    For all its stellar nature photography, its low hum of suspense, and Gedeck's raw and affecting performance, the film often feels like an illustrated audiobook rather than narrative drama.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    The key relationships are well drawn, if not especially revealing of anything human, and director Fletcher sometimes dares some welcome absurdity. But if you've seen movies built from the same parts as this one, you'll likely find this too familiar—but energetic, well-acted, and distinguished by artfully artless chatter.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    Monsters University feels not like the work of artists eager to express something but like that of likable pros whose existence depends on getting a rise out the kids. It's like the scares Sully and Mike spring on those sleeping tykes: technically impressive but a job un-anchored to anything more meaningful.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    A final twist stamps this as a companion or corrective to The Shape of Things, this time with the man as the monster. This isn't as bracing as that film, but it's far from the horror show LaBute's detractors often accuse him of writing.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    Often, the hilarity is indisputably intentional. If you think you'll laugh and clap, try it; if you know you'll hate it, you're right.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    Like first sex, writer-director Maggie Carey's debut feature, The To Do List, is quick and messy, fitfully pleasurable, full of promise but not quite adept at getting everyone off.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    It's not bad, but it feels rote, as if the film's events are just an excuse for us to hang with the film's people.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    Anderson distinguishes himself as the rare action director who shows us real bodies in real space in real reaction to each other, who prizes legibility over quick-cut dazzlement, who stages his fights with comic-book zeal rather than puffed-up graphic-novel miserableness.

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