Alan Scherstuhl
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For 212 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 62% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Alan Scherstuhl's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Medora
Lowest review score: 0 Saving Lincoln
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 19 out of 212
212 movie reviews
    • 57 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    The story's outline may be familiar, but its emphasis and quality are not.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    A genuine nail-biter, scrupulously made and fully involving, elemental in its simplicity.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    This film, a great one, demands a follow-up.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    Porter's film is dramatic, unsettling, despairing, and in the end thrilling -- at some point, it grows from a portrait of this country's problems into a celebration of a possible solution.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    Demme has crafted yet another superb document of musicians at work, one as much about creation—and the sources of inspiration—as it is about performance. A wonderful film, as in, it's full of wonders.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    This stellar, incisive slice-of-life doc centers on the kind of crowd-pleasing competition story that lures in audiences and then lays bare heartsick truths about small-town America today.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    This is a film to see and then see again, to soak in and marvel at and -- like its director -- try to keep up with.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    Levinson follows the ups and downs of bringing that beast of a collider online, but the movie's deepest thrill lies in what these men and women will theorize next, and how they will test it.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    Patient, observational film demands you surrender to it, that you keep your phone in your pocket, which means that movie theaters now sometimes offer a more unmediated look at the world than modern life itself.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    The stirring new documentary The Case Against 8, showcasing the lawyers and plaintiffs who challenged California's 2008 gay marriage ban, is the best kind of popular history, a film that trembles with tears and hope, and I dare you to get through it without bawling some yourself.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    A pained and gorgeous summoning, Petra Costa's haunted doc Elena dances with death, memory, and family, seducing viewers and then breaking their hearts.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film, while wrenching and audacious, is crafted with that humane and observational mastery of great Iranian cinema of recent decades.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    [A] strange, singular heartbreaker of a film about life still flourishing in the most inhospitable conditions.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    Vital, illuminating, and terrifying, Rory Kennedy's Last Days in Vietnam probes with clarity and thoroughness one moment of recent American history that has too long gone unreckoned with.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    Cutter Hodierne's gorgeous, harrowing debut feature, Fishing Without Nets, doesn't just ask you to feel a bit for Somali pirates, as Captain Phillips did -- Hodierne puts you in their shoes.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Alan Scherstuhl
    Vital, thoughtful, and deeply personal, first-timer Darius Clark Monroe's autobiographical doc stands as a testament to the power of movies to stir empathy.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Director James Ponsoldt gives us long, loose, single-shot courtship scenes, each a marvel of staging and performance.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    The directors plant a camera in front of Roth and get him talking. To smooth over edits, they show us book covers and old photos—Roth was dashing, charming, a little dangerous, one of his college friends tells us, but she doesn't need to say it. It's manifest, and it's still true. The film is especially recommended to anyone who thinks they hate him.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    The key question is whether this procedural—as in, here we watch killers proceed—contributes to any greater understanding. I believe it does.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Here's a movie with magic.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    The Attack is most avowedly "about" terrorism. But that's a subject, not the subject. The film, an arresting and upsetting one, is also about love, trauma, and trust, both within one particular marriage and within entire cultures.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Prince Avalanche reconciles Green's twin modes into a whole no other director could have, deeply felt and light as laughter.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    With extraordinary access, Pahuja illuminates extraordinary conflicts and contradictions facing modern girls in a country even less ready for them than ours.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    A spare and ravishing doc.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    It's sweaty, disorienting, thrilling. Rarely has a narrative feature so marvelously integrated a sequence of experimental filmmaking, and that sequence alone guarantees A Field in England should thrive on the midnight circuit.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    The movie is revealing, wrenching, and important, a reminder that what feels wrong in our gut—the effort to turn free-roaming and unknowable beasts into caged vaudevillians—is always worth investigating.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    A marvelous film, stripped of false urgency.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Wise, warm, funny, open, and more interested in life as it's actually lived than any other to debut this summer.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    As a whole, Martha Shane and Lana Wilson's wrenching, humane film is as convincing a brief as I can imagine in favor of that most controversial of all pregnancy-terminating procedures.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    The final, moving, nerve-wracking reels are all sea, sky, and desperation.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Even if you know this history already, A.K.A. Doc Pomus is vital and endearing, a celebration of a great artist, a great character, and the universality of great pop.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    A simple, solid, deeply affecting film.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Despite the poetry its subtitle promises, the fascinating crows-in-the-skyline doc Tokyo Waka is more informative than lyric, which is not at all a complaint.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    The horror's a long time coming, but Goldthwait and company make the waiting worth it.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Tender, humane, and searing, How I Live Now stands as something all too rare: a movie about young people that young people may love — but not one that lies to them, and not one built for them alone.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    The comic scenes arc into bleakness, and the bleak ones often collapse back into comedy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Caucus is a lively, hilarious, upsetting crash-course in recent history. It's also revelatory at times, especially as it reframes infamous sound bites in their of-the-moment context.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Michael Winterbottom's wise and involving Everyday specializes in unscripted-feeling moments that ache of life.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Ordinary life comes to look like a humiliation in the late reels of Lenny Cooke, yet another heartbreaker of a doc in which a compelling basketball story powers a discomfiting examination of a crisis facing young American men.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    If White Reindeer's satirical elements feel off the rack, that's because what they're satirizing in our real lives is, too.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    At least we have this gem, the rare tease of what could have been that actually proves satisfying enough on its own.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    A Most Wanted Man is simply a complex tale superbly told, with time for nuance and to soak in its mysteries.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Yet another first-rate film from a Middle East rich with them.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    What's singular here isn't that the stars are playing brother and sister, or that they stir such sublime and anxious joy from each other. It's that the real love story isn't even between the damaged-but-lovable characters. It's between two profoundly depressed people and life itself.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    The movie's packed with minor incidents, all fresh, compelling, and funny. It also boasts two lengthy scenes that are touched with something greater.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    The documentary is stellar, despite some vague visual-metaphor stuff involving dioramas in an attic. Bring something you can punch, as you will be furious.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Schimberg, in this debut, demonstrates rare assuredness in shooting and staging scenes, coaxing unexpected but true-feeling flourishes from his cast of mostly amateurs blessed with extraordinary faces.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Goldfine and Geller pace and structure The Galapagos Affair like the true-crime tale that it is, its mysteries rich and involving, its characters enduring in the imagination long after the film has ended.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    It's part caper comedy, part revenge tale, and part glorious whopper.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Co-writer/director/proudly nude star Amalric cuts everything to the quick: Most shots have the feel of still photos, the camera firmly planted, and the movie always hustles us to the next, back and forward in time, the effect part Resnais and part staccato Kodak slideshow.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Vital and vigorous even when its characters feel scraped of vigor/vitality, Philippe Garrel's latest finds boho Parisians facing the ends of marriages, affairs, and the feasibility of bohemian existence itself.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    We Are Mari Pepa is a sweaty, urgent, beautifully honest bliss out.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Dencik’s gorgeous, surprising, meditative film opens up one of the world’s last unknown places, and it will also make you want to befriend every Dane you can.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Sutton's Memphis framed in fascinating layers -- leaves and tree limbs, wig shops and overgrown gravel roads. It's a movie of a place and a character rather than about them.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    What's perhaps most moving in Waiting for August, a quiet film of weight and joy, is its sense of desperate normalcy.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Accomplishes the nearly impossible trick of updating viewers on the prevalence of genocide in the 20th and 21st centuries without rubbing our noses in our failure to stop it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Sure, all the studios offer anymore are big, dumb adventure spectacles, but that's not a knock against the achievement of this one, which at least parades wonders before us, not the least being the greatest dragon in the history of movies.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Director Richard LaGravenese, who also adapted the novel, lavishes the material with greater wit than its demographic demands, and the central love story feels warm-blooded—the air prickles between the leads.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film is like his life: scabrous, upsetting, kind of moving, funny as hell, alive with hints of how we've become what we are.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Despite its moral seriousness, the film's a crowd-pleaser, boasting tense set pieces, a raucous polyglot of voices and accents, beauty-in-poverty streetscapes, and two warm, brawling, big-hearted leads.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film is often beautiful and appealingly light. Every clear-eyed insight into why pushy people insist on pushing is matched by loose ensemble humor and lyric reveries.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The ending is a bit of an audience-pleasing cop-out, a retreat into formula after 80 minutes or so of upending it. But those upendings are memorable, the cast dishy fun, and Jerusha Hess and Shannon Hale's breeze of a script (based on Hale's novel) is smart about the allure of fictional romances.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    If you somehow manage to stay dry-eyed through the concert numbers, the end should set you bawling.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The funny stuff outweighs the cock-ups, and supporting performances from Stephen Merchant and Minnie Driver kick the movie toward something grander.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    David M. Rosenthal's sturdy, nasty rural noir, based on Matthew F. Jones's novel, is so sharp and rusted through that, after taking it in, you'll likely need a tetanus shot.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Greg "Freddy" Camalier's engaging new doc Muscle Shoals stands as a winning tribute to the coastal Alabama studio, musicians, and engineers who laid down some of the greatest pop tracks of the late '60s and early '70s.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    That patience of Reichardt's, and her dedication to showing us exclusively the things that we must see, makes the scenes of preparation — boat parking, fertilizer buying — hypnotic and suspenseful and practical all at once.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The movie is involving, the romance affecting, the sex sound, and the catch-as-catch-can handheld camerawork smartly appropriate for the scenario.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The Double, with its inviting alienation, nails a curious mood that's been too long absent from contemporary film: the anxious admission that the world might be weighted against the plucky individual, and that prickling you feel just before such thoughts make a sweat break out.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Newell's film doesn't supplant Lean's, of course. The yearning is more vague, the gloom less consummate. But it's the best since, rich in feeling and dark beauty, alive with the superior scenecraft, chatter, and imagination of the most beloved of novelists.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Dark Touch, like much of the best horror, works the fears that connect to real life.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    This is squirmy, hilarious fun.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    In Secret boasts vigor and thematic richness, that feeling of artists expressing something vital.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    For the most part, the narrative here feels generational, representative, rather than invested in the specific incidents of specific lives.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Kudos to the filmmakers for so adeptly laying out the history of American evangelicals' Ugandan mission, and for noting that HIV infection rates there have gone up since the abstinence-only education started.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film stirs richer, truer feelings once it becomes a one-man show. This is due both to Heisserer's and Walker's skill — the tension is strong, the scenario elemental, and Walker's harried, urgent hero is compelling — but also the fact that the movies are really good at dudes doing things, especially when those things are scrappy, desperate, and heroic.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Eastwood may never show us his boys discovering themselves under that street lamp, but he gives us a clutch of moments worth treasuring — and mostly without overdoing it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The old footage — newsreels, scraps of home movies — is entrancing, and even those familiar details eventually accrete with the fresh ones into something grand and stirring, especially near the conclusion.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    A Walk Among the Tombstones is an uncommonly well-made thriller.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The kind of movie fans will be quoting for the rest of their lives, Shoot Me, from director-producer Chiemi Karasawa, is as much a playdate as portrait, a jumble of salty highlights attesting to the pleasure of her company.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Credit this spirited, uncommonly effective found-footage thriller for breaking the templates promised by its genre and title.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    A restless, sunnily shot, one-thing-after-another travelogue of the peculiarities of American worship and belief.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    A major achievement in sunny wretchedness, Álex de la Iglesia's splatter-comedy Witching & Bitching projectile pukes its outrages at you with a gusto recalling the early days of those (sadly) reformed upchuckers Sam Raimi and Peter Jackson.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    For all the hurtling plot, and its occasional workaday scenecraft, Burning Bush proves an engrossing historical drama, low-key but in its final moments devastating.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    It's part Live at Birdland, part Boy in the Plastic Bubble, all warmly thrilling.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    There's much in Born to Fly to thrill to, dream with, flinch from: dancers leaping from a great whirling wheel and smacking onto mats far below; dancers ducking and leaping a wickedly spinning I-beam or cinderblock.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Poitras shows us history as it happens, scenes of such intimate momentousness that the movie's a must-see piece of work even if, in its totality, it's underwhelming as argument or cinema.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    It's not enough to call this the rare franchise action movie to bring the goods; it's the even rarer one whose creators seem to understand what the goods even are.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Everyone involved at last seems to understand that the mode here is comic. Previous entries suffered from self-important glumness that gummed up the fun whenever the cars weren’t racing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    After going this far, both in raunchy bad-boyism and mock-apologetic love-us shamelessness, they've effectively blown up their own formula. That's not a bad thing. This is the end; now it's time to try for more.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The most welcome change is the tone. Wadlow has decided he's making a straight-up comedy, and he demonstrates a knack for it.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    As in so many Hollywood spectacles, the message and medium are at hopeless odds... Still, the set-up is arresting, the domestic scenes well observed and acted, and the payoffs involving that Roomba toy excellent. Also, a late-film twist isn't a surprise, exactly, but it is delicious.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film's heady buzz is invigorating, and there are substantial pleasures—and laughs—to be found in all its real-life-just-gone-sour strangeness.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Far from a film about sharks sharking and love not working out, this About Last Night revels in friendship, fidelity, and something too rarely seen in the movies today: the idea that being young and black in Los Angeles can be glorious.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Milos's film pulses with f#*!-it-all abandon and chintzy eastern-Euro club beats.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The performance and filmmaking are invigorating.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Passion is pretty good.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The ending has a surfeit of sugar, but writer-director Arvin Chen's story jaunts along, a cheery rom-com tinged with dream visions and a somewhat daring conceit.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Directors Tom Bean and Luke Poling never shy away from the possibility that Plimpton at times was more a personality than a serious writer.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    A flawed, fascinating testament to a time of discovery in Hollywood: of how stories could be told onscreen, of what great actors might find within themselves, of just what in the hell this country had become in the late-'60s crackup.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    An often funny workplace hostage comedy that doesn't demand prior knowledge of the character.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Dolphin Tale 2 is a singularly honest animal film: It never insists that Winter wouldn't prefer to be elsewhere . . . or that what she feels for them has anything to do with what we think of as love.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Exciting and thoughtful, scraped free of the empty provocations of the wicked-pixie Hit-Girl scenes in Kick-Ass, I Declare War offers movie thrills—smartly plotted betrayals and escapes—as well as its share of disappointments.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The doc breezily sketches out the process of casing, smashing, grabbing, escaping, and fencing, not in as much detail as David Samuels's stellar New Yorker piece on the Panthers a couple years back, but with some added pathos.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Vikingdom trembles with great dumb joy even before we meet the apparently handcrafted hell-dragon that looks like a set of windup chattering teeth combined with a homecoming float.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    It's just zombies versus an international research station on the wastes of the Red Planet, with all that such a premise promises.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Complaints that there's too little here about how the Jejune Institute was hatched or what it all may have meant matter little in the face of the one great thing The Institute does offer: a record of the mad invention of the game's masterminds.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The pained, textured performances of Sevigny and Malone enrich their scenes, but when it ranges away from its leads, The Wait can seem like an anthology of moments rather than a narrative whole, although those moments do accumulate into a mood of chilly, gently surreal isolation.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The Visitor is a mess, but a revelatory one, both a ripe, bizarre thriller and a fascinating example of how filmmakers first responded to the interstellar millions stirred up by Spielberg and George Lucas: by thieving the good bits.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film surges by, powered by high spirits, well-plotted surprises, and the directors' admirable attention to both the real and romantic.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film is more an on-the-fly glimpse of the scene than a deep-dive exploration, but that doesn't make it any less electric.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film has its insights, but perhaps its greatest value is in how it offers something of a record of what time with the talkative, tireless Hentoff is like.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    If you find other people worth your time and attention, Next Goal Wins will stir you.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Bauder's film is a diagnosis of a system that is hopelessly sick and not being treated. Bring a stress ball to squish up as you watch.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The photography fascinates even when the story flags, and the film bristles with small revelations.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The doc is often terrific fun. But it is a work of observation and advocacy rather than journalism.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Despite some cutesiness, the film’s a fascinating portrait of loneliness, of talent undirected toward purpose, of the mysteries of the mind.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Any 30 minutes of Summer of Blood might have me in hysterics. But the sputtering torrent of Eric's yakking proves wearying over 90: Dude's built for speed-dating.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    Monsters University feels not like the work of artists eager to express something but like that of likable pros whose existence depends on getting a rise out the kids. It's like the scares Sully and Mike spring on those sleeping tykes: technically impressive but a job un-anchored to anything more meaningful.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    The good news: Here's a lavish, serious science-fiction picture, one that on occasion transcends big-budget hit-making convention to glance against grandeur...Which brings us to Tom Cruise, the not-necessarily-good news. However engaging its end-times mysteries, Oblivion is still a Tom Cruise movie.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    The whole thing has an amiable, gag-to-gag vibe for most of the first hour.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    Often, the hilarity is indisputably intentional. If you think you'll laugh and clap, try it; if you know you'll hate it, you're right.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    Fuqua steadily parades his big moments, and the movie works as unhinged spectacle. As a thriller it's less certain.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    Like first sex, writer-director Maggie Carey's debut feature, The To Do List, is quick and messy, fitfully pleasurable, full of promise but not quite adept at getting everyone off.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    The story and its violence are deeply silly, but there's something nervy and upsetting that distinguishes the film's incidental excitement.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    Mud
    It's too bad...that a movie so attuned to natural currents in the end gets caught up in Hollywood's impossible ones.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film is admirably committed to simulating the messy experience of life as a real Maisie might live it. But sometimes, as she's tuckered out on her exquisite linens beneath gorgeous exposed brick and shelves of handcrafted toys, Maisie's world feels easier to admire than it is to worry over.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    For all its stellar nature photography, its low hum of suspense, and Gedeck's raw and affecting performance, the film often feels like an illustrated audiobook rather than narrative drama.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    Even if you've read the novel, and are prepared for the long running time and haphazard structure, this isn't a movie you should expect to feel or even closely follow. See it if Midnight's Children is a novel you always wanted the gist of.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    Anderson distinguishes himself as the rare action director who shows us real bodies in real space in real reaction to each other, who prizes legibility over quick-cut dazzlement, who stages his fights with comic-book zeal rather than puffed-up graphic-novel miserableness.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    The key relationships are well drawn, if not especially revealing of anything human, and director Fletcher sometimes dares some welcome absurdity. But if you've seen movies built from the same parts as this one, you'll likely find this too familiar—but energetic, well-acted, and distinguished by artfully artless chatter.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    A final twist stamps this as a companion or corrective to The Shape of Things, this time with the man as the monster. This isn't as bracing as that film, but it's far from the horror show LaBute's detractors often accuse him of writing.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    It's heartening to have a tony war film about PTSD and forgiveness; it would be grander still to have one that dedicated itself more fully to examining the courage it would take to offer that forgiveness, rather than dash its energies upon the dreary cowardice of the crime itself.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    What director Knight excels at is continually inventive framing and composition, at suggesting, through layers of window and reflected traffic, the mental state of Locke, the hero.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    It's not bad, but it feels rote, as if the film's events are just an excuse for us to hang with the film's people.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    Once it gets going, it's fine, a somewhat scattered précis of the life and accomplishment of one of the 20th century's towering musicians, activists, and curiosities.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    For much of its running time, Camp X-Ray stands as the fullest on-screen imaginative treatment of two of the defining developments of the last 15 years of American life: the deployment of women in our volunteer army, and the indefinite detention of men we think, but can't quite prove, deserve it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    Katz stages the contests with infectious energy... Too bad the last half hour feels like Katz is rubbing our face in the several turds he shows us, reminding us that people are awful. Of course they are. What else do you have to tell us?
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    It's all rather familiar, but the key image of a glacier glazed over with something like gore proves majestic, and tension throbs throughout a scene of a scientist following his dog into a blood-veined tunnel inside that glacier.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    While mostly well made, and certain to serve as a handy précis for the J-school set, A Fragile Trust is more a soiling reminder than a revelation for anyone already familiar with Blair's case.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    Some of the surprise works, but the final gotcha won't getcha.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    The filmmakers have gotten extraordinary access to Mohamed and ravaged Somalia... But it's disappointing that they did not capture more scenes of Mohamed's wife and her family, who in the end are the ones who make the most momentous decision.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    Dylan Baker's film bests larger-budgeted fare like When the Game Stands Tall thanks to ace acting, a humble spirit, and all-around sturdy craftsmanship.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Scherstuhl
    As with the Twilight series, The Host's infelicities—drab dialogue, ridiculous plotting, more emotional crises than there is story—are enlivened by its thematic eccentricities.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Scherstuhl
    Never a disaster but only fitfully inspired, The Amazing Spider-Man 2 doesn't quite end well, but it does end promisingly.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film's biggest surprise is that, after Wonderstone loses everything, we're expected to feel something besides impatience as he learns to become a better person—and gapes like a child at the wonder of magic.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Scherstuhl
    The Conjuring's problem, beyond its lack of a conjuring, is how its otherworldly hokum is stubbornly of this world.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Scherstuhl
    Disconnect might play better a decade from now, when it's more clearly a compendium of contemporary fears rather than some dire expression of them.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Scherstuhl
    Unlike many of the features targeted to what Hollywood is calling the "faith audience," the movie is well-acted and shot, often thoughtful and (intentionally) funny.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Scherstuhl
    Letourneur captures film fests' buzz of self-congratulatory promiscuity but never makes the many parties and mishaps compelling.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Scherstuhl
    There's something to be said for fiction that, in its form, dares to resemble life as it's lived. Our minor failings and chemical imbalances certainly shape our stories. This troubled yet promising debut gets that much right.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Scherstuhl
    If the filmmakers had been more daring with perspectives and narrative structure, and afforded their Indian characters the screentime and agency JB enjoys on his adventure, Million Dollar Arm might have distinguished itself.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Scherstuhl
    All that prickly inner conflict Ruffalo is so adept at suggesting? Cheery Begin Again wants none of it, offering instead lots of scenes of two characters we don't believe could ever exist arguing about authenticity in pop music.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Scherstuhl
    Egoyan musters some of the power he brought to The Sweet Hereafter, another lost-children tale, but little of the lyric beauty or sense of a community coming unglued.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Scherstuhl
    The comedy's too broad to take the characters seriously, and the vibe is breezily aimless, a mistake in a story about anxious waiting.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Scherstuhl
    Sal
    A stubbornly not-bad character study.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Scherstuhl
    Some moments still work after the movie grows mawkish.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Scherstuhl
    Sympathetic audiences may be diverted by Space Station 76's period design and skilled performances, and by the mystery of what exactly the filmmakers are going for. (The less sympathetic may just ask what the point is.)
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Scherstuhl
    Too much of the movie feels like notes toward a portrait rather than the portrait itself, and Mock's failure to nail down the Thomas case drains the power from the victory-lap scenes of Hill addressing adoring crowds.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Scherstuhl
    Every time a story thread seems to be getting somewhere, Winter in the Blood vaults to something else, with little regard for the tale’s rhythms — the movie doesn’t feel like a puzzle to solve; it’s a puzzle to assemble.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Scherstuhl
    In his second feature, McCarthy shows he's mastered the things we already know scare us onscreen; next, how about something we don't expect?
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    42
    The movie sugars up Robinson's story, and like too many period pieces it summons some vague idea of a warmer, simpler past by bathing everything in thick amber light, as if each scene is one of those preserved mosquitoes that begat the monsters of Jurassic Park.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    The issues at play here are fascinating, but Condon and Singer never let any argument about journalism or the philosophy of free information last longer than a couple ping-ponged lines between master (Assange) and student (Domscheit-Berg).
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    Segal's gearbox gets jammed between recession-era sports drama and brainless comedy, especially as Hart hollers pop-culture punch lines like he's the squirrel sidekick in a CGI kiddo flick.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    Christopher Felver's stumbling hagiography Ferlinghetti: A Rebirth of Wonder does no wrong by its celebrated subject-- but it never illuminates him, either.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    Well-shot and sometimes briefly affecting, especially when Mortimer is given a scene that lasts longer then thirty seconds, the film moves too quickly for its many incidents to have much impact, and what limited power it builds is dissipated by mortifying narration.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    The more typical approach transforms the material, and not for the better—rather than a revelation about how it feels to live her life, this feels like a document of what that life might look like as a conventional, often pokey movie.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    Too much of the last hour is a muddle of unconvincing, hard-to-read nighttime action scenes.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    The movie is more effective as sports fantasy than as theology.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    Falcone’s film is an unsteady mix of broad comedy and indie heart, asking us first to roar at Tammy’s ignorance and outrageousness and then to be moved at this lovable misfit muddling toward love, maturity, and a better life.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    Simply put, the care and thoughtfulness that goes into footage-faking has not been applied to the film's script or structure.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    An hour of these repetitive, predictable disasters should wear down all but the most bailout-hating viewers.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    The doc is only about as revealing as a middling magazine article on the subject.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    Swanberg has made an inspiring career out of rejecting the aesthetic crimes of Hollywood. It's dispiriting, then, that he so doggedly indulges in its tradition of male gazing.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    A time-killing kid-flick whose title is an exact summary of its plot.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    The persuasive power of individual moments suggests that director William Eubank has a bright future — and could push himself harder when writing his scripts.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    Too cartoonish to be cathartic, and too ghoulish to be honest fun, Into the Storm is mostly a somewhat uncomfortable sit enlivened by occasional hilariousness.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    As far as escapist fluff laced with totally unnecessary real-world horror goes, The November Man isn't wretched.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    You may feel some anger if you pay to watch this. Or you may not, as Rage offers exactly what you think a Nic Cage movie called Rage would, except maybe for continually inspired lunacy.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    Hilary Brougher's YA-ish horror satire/romance/whatzit Innocence, adapted from Jane Mendelsohn's novel, boasts a wicked setup, some strong performances, several gloriously bloody spook-out images, and a movie-wrecking hypoglycemic listlessness.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    The directors demonstrate confident technique in most of the scare scenes, but their uncertain touch with actors and dialogue makes a cock-up of the climax.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    "I wanted to make something energetic, optimistic, universal, and real," Bailey announces in voiceover as the movie begins. She's certainly accomplished that, but it's too bad she didn't also aim for vital, illuminating, or consistently compelling.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Alan Scherstuhl
    Jaden is fine at running, jumping, fearful trembling, and affecting steely resolution. He doesn't yet have his father's charisma; perhaps to help him out, dad opted not to bring that charisma to the set.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 30 Alan Scherstuhl
    It doesn't come close to working, but it's sweet that they tried.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Alan Scherstuhl
    Before it descends into Percy Jackson and the Things That Happen in Movies Like This, the adventure at times clicks into the inventive groove of Rick Riordan's Percy Jackson novels, which at their best are touched with the high strangeness of the ancient tales that inspire them.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Alan Scherstuhl
    Some of the movie isn't bad.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 30 Alan Scherstuhl
    Too much of the movie is just people being crabby (or, later, dumb!) in fascinating places, which is less enthralling than the places themselves.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 30 Alan Scherstuhl
    The story feels shapeless, un-tailored, defiantly off the rack.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 30 Alan Scherstuhl
    In the end, all NOW reveals is that talented people did a difficult thing in far-off places — and that now they have a video scrapbook.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Alan Scherstuhl
    Carl Deal and Tia Lessin's scattershot agitprop doc takes the perfidy of the billionaire Koch brothers as its given, offering up montages of Tea Party screamers rather than investigative reporting or rigorous argumentation.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film is dismayingly formless, every point is made too many times, and there's too little drama or revelation here.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 20 Alan Scherstuhl
    This Hungarian-shot bore is so indistinct it reeks of no place more than Hollywood, where the fascinating specifics of history and legend are ground into universal mush.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 20 Alan Scherstuhl
    What the movie gets hilariously, howlingly wrong is the idea that a life like Salinger's—so extraordinary, yet so willfully humdrum—could somehow be captured by the most shopworn of cinematic techniques.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 20 Alan Scherstuhl
    A shapeless, uncritical documentary.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 20 Alan Scherstuhl
    It’s all rote, dashed through, and somewhat detestable.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 20 Alan Scherstuhl
    Son of God is a narrative shambles, more thudding than thunderous, shot with no spirit or distinction, always feeling like a sprawling TV miniseries cut up to fit into theatrical running time.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 10 Alan Scherstuhl
    The movie is constructed like a window some kid broke and then tried to glue back together.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 10 Alan Scherstuhl
    The only true surprise here is D'Souza's haplessness in constructing both film and argument.
    • 9 Metascore
    • 10 Alan Scherstuhl
    The movie's so slipshod and half-assed that I almost feel for Rand, whose ideas have proved enduring enough that they at least deserve a fair representation, if only for the sake of refutation.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 0 Alan Scherstuhl
    The tragic ending the material demands precludes viewers from complaining that the movie is the most unpleasant thing that could happen in a theater.