Alan Scherstuhl

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For 569 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 61% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Alan Scherstuhl's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 68
Highest review score: 100 Strong Island
Lowest review score: 0 Saving Lincoln
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 40 out of 569
569 movie reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The tense final act...investigates its moral quandaries with a rigor this kind of bad-seed street-teen movie usually can’t manage.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Here adolescent wanderlust, powered by the characters’ persistent and confused arousal, continually edges against comedy and terror. Scariest as an examination of what fascinates us, this debut feature will annoy and alienate many, but it’s the work of a dynamic new talent.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    That patience of Reichardt's, and her dedication to showing us exclusively the things that we must see, makes the scenes of preparation — boat parking, fertilizer buying — hypnotic and suspenseful and practical all at once.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    A feat of workplace naturalism.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Kopple's film is intimate and rousing.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The scale of the occasional mayhem is heightened, but its spirit and ingenuity doesn't feel wholly at odds with the books.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    It's part Live at Birdland, part Boy in the Plastic Bubble, all warmly thrilling.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The result is something like the best science-fair project ever, an inviting performance piece that tasks viewers with the pleasurable, imaginative engagement that more seamless special effects deny.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    At first the stakes are as light yet rich as Sentaro's pancakes; then come marvelous cine-essays on bean-soaking and paste-prepping, plus — in the film's tragedy-tinged final third — a change-of-seasons montage for the ages.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Director Richard LaGravenese, who also adapted the novel, lavishes the material with greater wit than its demographic demands, and the central love story feels warm-blooded—the air prickles between the leads.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    In those days after the misbegotten verdict in the trial of the four police officers who kicked and beat Rodney King, these Angelenos discovered what they and their neighbors were capable of. Ridley’s patient, humane approach allows us, over his film’s 145 minutes, to discover it, too.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Newell's film doesn't supplant Lean's, of course. The yearning is more vague, the gloom less consummate. But it's the best since, rich in feeling and dark beauty, alive with the superior scenecraft, chatter, and imagination of the most beloved of novelists.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Thomas White's lost-and-found avant-lulu Who's Crazy? pulses with the newly possible.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    It's an honest and incisive and peppery examination of one of his life's strangest but most enduring relationships — and the way that timidity and kindness often work out to being the same thing.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Kudos to the filmmakers for so adeptly laying out the history of American evangelicals' Ugandan mission, and for noting that HIV infection rates there have gone up since the abstinence-only education started.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The funny stuff outweighs the cock-ups, and supporting performances from Stephen Merchant and Minnie Driver kick the movie toward something grander.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Kent Jones's documentary take on François Truffaut's exhaustive career-survey 1966 interview with Alfred Hitchcock is an arresting précis, sharply edited and generous with its film clips — it's a smashing supplement to Truffaut's classic study.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film examines, with wit and patience, the hard work of community-building — and the toll on someone far from home, doing work that’s not his calling.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Milos's film pulses with f#*!-it-all abandon and chintzy eastern-Euro club beats.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The story works out like you might expect. The joys are in the way director Breck Eisner, like Diesel, is earnest about this goofiness. His direction might not showcase the full wit of the script, but it does honor its inventiveness.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Jason Silverman and Samba Gadjigo's heartfelt doc is rich in footage and access.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film is handsomely mounted, traditional in its scenecraft, superbly acted, and much less ham-handed than you might expect from a historical drama about a great man’s great moment.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Ant-Man is spry and often funny, despite its familiarity.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Exciting and thoughtful, scraped free of the empty provocations of the wicked-pixie Hit-Girl scenes in Kick-Ass, I Declare War offers movie thrills—smartly plotted betrayals and escapes—as well as its share of disappointments.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film surges by, powered by high spirits, well-plotted surprises, and the directors' admirable attention to both the real and romantic.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Vikingdom trembles with great dumb joy even before we meet the apparently handcrafted hell-dragon that looks like a set of windup chattering teeth combined with a homecoming float.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    If you find other people worth your time and attention, Next Goal Wins will stir you.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Vanderbilt, the screenwriter of Zodiac, here making his debut as a director, masters the heady pulse of high-end, high-stakes journalism.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Passion is pretty good.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The Founder slowly reveals itself as a don't-let-the-devil-into-your-house parable, one that uses all the techniques of inspirational moviemaking to disguise that devil's intentions, even from the devil himself.

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