Alan Scherstuhl
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For 256 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 61% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Alan Scherstuhl's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Tip Top
Lowest review score: 0 Saving Lincoln
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 23 out of 256
256 movie reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    What's singular here isn't that the stars are playing brother and sister, or that they stir such sublime and anxious joy from each other. It's that the real love story isn't even between the damaged-but-lovable characters. It's between two profoundly depressed people and life itself.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Co-writer/director/proudly nude star Amalric cuts everything to the quick: Most shots have the feel of still photos, the camera firmly planted, and the movie always hustles us to the next, back and forward in time, the effect part Resnais and part staccato Kodak slideshow.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    What's perhaps most moving in Waiting for August, a quiet film of weight and joy, is its sense of desperate normalcy.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    A 45-minute proto-hip-hop bliss-out, a masterpiece of train- and tag-spotting dedicated to memorializing the extravagant graffiti on its era's MTA trains and how those trains rumbled across Brooklyn and the Bronx, bearing not just exhausted New Yorkers but gifted artists' urgent personal expression.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Accomplishes the nearly impossible trick of updating viewers on the prevalence of genocide in the 20th and 21st centuries without rubbing our noses in our failure to stop it.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Valedictory and elegiac, Keach's film captures a performer who only truly seems to inhabit himself during the performances.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Nothing in this film (and little in any other movie this year) compares to the scenes of Sandusky's adopted son, Matt, recounting his realization that the charges of pedophilia against Sandusky squared with the ways Sandusky had treated him, too — treatment he'd never been brave enough to admit.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    The director invites us in, to play and dream.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    If beauty and revelation is your bottom line, Anthony Powell's rhapsodic Antarctica: A Year on Ice will prove a grand time at the movies.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Zero Motivation opens as bleak, rebellious comedy but grows into a smart and moving story of entering adulthood.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    The biggest suspense: As everything gets worse for everyone, will this consummate director's outraged worldview afford anyone any pity? At first you'll seethe — then your heart will ache.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Forget its generic title, its breakup setup, and its indie-standard Brooklyn walk-and-talks: Writer/director Desiree Akhavan's Appropriate Behavior is the freshest comedy of life and love in the city since Obvious Child.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Those more devoted to the genre can debate whether Matthew Vaughn's Kingsman is the best comic-book movie of the last few years. What's beyond argument, however, is that Vaughn has whipped up the most interesting one, the only to make ferocious, unsettling art out of the great contradiction of superheroic fantasy: jolly do-goodism and its brutalizing sadism.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Director Richard LaGravenese, who also adapted the novel, lavishes the material with greater wit than its demographic demands, and the central love story feels warm-blooded—the air prickles between the leads.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Despite its moral seriousness, the film's a crowd-pleaser, boasting tense set pieces, a raucous polyglot of voices and accents, beauty-in-poverty streetscapes, and two warm, brawling, big-hearted leads.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film is like his life: scabrous, upsetting, kind of moving, funny as hell, alive with hints of how we've become what we are.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    If you somehow manage to stay dry-eyed through the concert numbers, the end should set you bawling.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film is often beautiful and appealingly light. Every clear-eyed insight into why pushy people insist on pushing is matched by loose ensemble humor and lyric reveries.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The funny stuff outweighs the cock-ups, and supporting performances from Stephen Merchant and Minnie Driver kick the movie toward something grander.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The ending is a bit of an audience-pleasing cop-out, a retreat into formula after 80 minutes or so of upending it. But those upendings are memorable, the cast dishy fun, and Jerusha Hess and Shannon Hale's breeze of a script (based on Hale's novel) is smart about the allure of fictional romances.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    David M. Rosenthal's sturdy, nasty rural noir, based on Matthew F. Jones's novel, is so sharp and rusted through that, after taking it in, you'll likely need a tetanus shot.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Dark Touch, like much of the best horror, works the fears that connect to real life.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Greg "Freddy" Camalier's engaging new doc Muscle Shoals stands as a winning tribute to the coastal Alabama studio, musicians, and engineers who laid down some of the greatest pop tracks of the late '60s and early '70s.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The movie is involving, the romance affecting, the sex sound, and the catch-as-catch-can handheld camerawork smartly appropriate for the scenario.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    For the most part, the narrative here feels generational, representative, rather than invested in the specific incidents of specific lives.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Kudos to the filmmakers for so adeptly laying out the history of American evangelicals' Ugandan mission, and for noting that HIV infection rates there have gone up since the abstinence-only education started.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    This is squirmy, hilarious fun.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Newell's film doesn't supplant Lean's, of course. The yearning is more vague, the gloom less consummate. But it's the best since, rich in feeling and dark beauty, alive with the superior scenecraft, chatter, and imagination of the most beloved of novelists.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Sure, all the studios offer anymore are big, dumb adventure spectacles, but that's not a knock against the achievement of this one, which at least parades wonders before us, not the least being the greatest dragon in the history of movies.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film stirs richer, truer feelings once it becomes a one-man show. This is due both to Heisserer's and Walker's skill — the tension is strong, the scenario elemental, and Walker's harried, urgent hero is compelling — but also the fact that the movies are really good at dudes doing things, especially when those things are scrappy, desperate, and heroic.

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