Alan Scherstuhl

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For 398 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 62% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 35% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Alan Scherstuhl's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Western
Lowest review score: 0 Saving Lincoln
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 32 out of 398
398 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    At least we have this gem, the rare tease of what could have been that actually proves satisfying enough on its own.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Valedictory and elegiac, Keach's film captures a performer who only truly seems to inhabit himself during the performances.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    It's part caper comedy, part revenge tale, and part glorious whopper.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Even if you know this history already, A.K.A. Doc Pomus is vital and endearing, a celebration of a great artist, a great character, and the universality of great pop.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    The biggest suspense: As everything gets worse for everyone, will this consummate director's outraged worldview afford anyone any pity? At first you'll seethe — then your heart will ache.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    A simple, solid, deeply affecting film.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Forget its generic title, its breakup setup, and its indie-standard Brooklyn walk-and-talks: Writer/director Desiree Akhavan's Appropriate Behavior is the freshest comedy of life and love in the city since Obvious Child.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Vital and vigorous even when its characters feel scraped of vigor/vitality, Philippe Garrel's latest finds boho Parisians facing the ends of marriages, affairs, and the feasibility of bohemian existence itself.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    We Are Mari Pepa is a sweaty, urgent, beautifully honest bliss out.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Part of what makes writer-director Rick Famuyiwa's Dope so fresh and joyous is that in many key ways it's not new at all.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Director James Ponsoldt gives us long, loose, single-shot courtship scenes, each a marvel of staging and performance.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    The directors plant a camera in front of Roth and get him talking. To smooth over edits, they show us book covers and old photos—Roth was dashing, charming, a little dangerous, one of his college friends tells us, but she doesn't need to say it. It's manifest, and it's still true. The film is especially recommended to anyone who thinks they hate him.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Schimberg, in this debut, demonstrates rare assuredness in shooting and staging scenes, coaxing unexpected but true-feeling flourishes from his cast of mostly amateurs blessed with extraordinary faces.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    Tender, humane, and searing, How I Live Now stands as something all too rare: a movie about young people that young people may love — but not one that lies to them, and not one built for them alone.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Alan Scherstuhl
    It's a tough film to shake, a slice-of-life that slices, knifelike. It's a funny drama of brothers that first makes you hate its prickly leads but then, after steeping you in their bottomed-out day-to-day, might inspire you to hope for them.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Allah, a street photographer of deserved renown, has achieved something here beyond the familiar documentary impulse to show us the people who live on the streets. His immersive, unsettling techniques dig at a sense of what it might feel like to be among them.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The early scenes, of the couple falling for each other, offer more inspired gorgeous wonder than late Malick films, and the emotions are more piercing.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    For the most part, the narrative here feels generational, representative, rather than invested in the specific incidents of specific lives.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The Double, with its inviting alienation, nails a curious mood that's been too long absent from contemporary film: the anxious admission that the world might be weighted against the plucky individual, and that prickling you feel just before such thoughts make a sweat break out.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film is often beautiful and appealingly light. Every clear-eyed insight into why pushy people insist on pushing is matched by loose ensemble humor and lyric reveries.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Moments of pain and revelation keep coming, all varied and surprising. These accrete into a mountain of evidence for Sauper's thesis: South Sudan might be new, but the forces shaping it are the same that have damned Africans for centuries — the rest of the world's lust for resources and conversions. That everything is beautiful just makes it hurt all the more.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Finlay tells this story with the usual doc techniques. The interviews are marvelous, especially the ones with Ellis's exes, who attest not just to his weakness for groupies but to his collection of trophies.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Director Levan Gabriadze is adept at the sinking something's not right creepiness too few horror films dig into. His techniques are certain to be copy-pasted by imitators.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The usual doc mix of interviews and vintage photos is moving and surprisingly funny.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Sure, all the studios offer anymore are big, dumb adventure spectacles, but that's not a knock against the achievement of this one, which at least parades wonders before us, not the least being the greatest dragon in the history of movies.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    This is squirmy, hilarious fun.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film, with its traditional mix of talking heads and vintage footage, does not try to hide the Panthers' advocacy of violence.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film is an adventure, a reason to despair, a chance to hang out with a great talker, and an often beautiful portrait of this city's promise and cruelty.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    The kind of movie fans will be quoting for the rest of their lives, Shoot Me, from director-producer Chiemi Karasawa, is as much a playdate as portrait, a jumble of salty highlights attesting to the pleasure of her company.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Despite its moral seriousness, the film's a crowd-pleaser, boasting tense set pieces, a raucous polyglot of voices and accents, beauty-in-poverty streetscapes, and two warm, brawling, big-hearted leads.

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