Alan Scherstuhl
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For 194 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 61% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 6.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Alan Scherstuhl's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 It's a Disaster
Lowest review score: 0 Saving Lincoln
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 19 out of 194
194 movie reviews
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The most welcome change is the tone. Wadlow has decided he's making a straight-up comedy, and he demonstrates a knack for it.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Exciting and thoughtful, scraped free of the empty provocations of the wicked-pixie Hit-Girl scenes in Kick-Ass, I Declare War offers movie thrills—smartly plotted betrayals and escapes—as well as its share of disappointments.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Passion is pretty good.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Vikingdom trembles with great dumb joy even before we meet the apparently handcrafted hell-dragon that looks like a set of windup chattering teeth combined with a homecoming float.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Complaints that there's too little here about how the Jejune Institute was hatched or what it all may have meant matter little in the face of the one great thing The Institute does offer: a record of the mad invention of the game's masterminds.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    It's just zombies versus an international research station on the wastes of the Red Planet, with all that such a premise promises.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The ending has a surfeit of sugar, but writer-director Arvin Chen's story jaunts along, a cheery rom-com tinged with dream visions and a somewhat daring conceit.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The pained, textured performances of Sevigny and Malone enrich their scenes, but when it ranges away from its leads, The Wait can seem like an anthology of moments rather than a narrative whole, although those moments do accumulate into a mood of chilly, gently surreal isolation.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film surges by, powered by high spirits, well-plotted surprises, and the directors' admirable attention to both the real and romantic.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Far from a film about sharks sharking and love not working out, this About Last Night revels in friendship, fidelity, and something too rarely seen in the movies today: the idea that being young and black in Los Angeles can be glorious.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The Visitor is a mess, but a revelatory one, both a ripe, bizarre thriller and a fascinating example of how filmmakers first responded to the interstellar millions stirred up by Spielberg and George Lucas: by thieving the good bits.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    An often funny workplace hostage comedy that doesn't demand prior knowledge of the character.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film is more an on-the-fly glimpse of the scene than a deep-dive exploration, but that doesn't make it any less electric.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    If you find other people worth your time and attention, Next Goal Wins will stir you.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Bauder's film is a diagnosis of a system that is hopelessly sick and not being treated. Bring a stress ball to squish up as you watch.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film has its insights, but perhaps its greatest value is in how it offers something of a record of what time with the talkative, tireless Hentoff is like.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The photography fascinates even when the story flags, and the film bristles with small revelations.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The doc is often terrific fun. But it is a work of observation and advocacy rather than journalism.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Dolphin Tale 2 is a singularly honest animal film: It never insists that Winter wouldn't prefer to be elsewhere . . . or that what she feels for them has anything to do with what we think of as love.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    I ask this next question as someone who mostly admires the film: Doesn't the fantasy of avenging unthinkable crimes demand fantasizing about those crimes? Still, A Walk Among the Tombstones is an uncommonly well-made thriller.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Despite some cutesiness, the film’s a fascinating portrait of loneliness, of talent undirected toward purpose, of the mysteries of the mind.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    The good news: Here's a lavish, serious science-fiction picture, one that on occasion transcends big-budget hit-making convention to glance against grandeur...Which brings us to Tom Cruise, the not-necessarily-good news. However engaging its end-times mysteries, Oblivion is still a Tom Cruise movie.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    Mud
    It's too bad...that a movie so attuned to natural currents in the end gets caught up in Hollywood's impossible ones.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    Even if you've read the novel, and are prepared for the long running time and haphazard structure, this isn't a movie you should expect to feel or even closely follow. See it if Midnight's Children is a novel you always wanted the gist of.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film is admirably committed to simulating the messy experience of life as a real Maisie might live it. But sometimes, as she's tuckered out on her exquisite linens beneath gorgeous exposed brick and shelves of handcrafted toys, Maisie's world feels easier to admire than it is to worry over.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    The story and its violence are deeply silly, but there's something nervy and upsetting that distinguishes the film's incidental excitement.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    For all its stellar nature photography, its low hum of suspense, and Gedeck's raw and affecting performance, the film often feels like an illustrated audiobook rather than narrative drama.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    The key relationships are well drawn, if not especially revealing of anything human, and director Fletcher sometimes dares some welcome absurdity. But if you've seen movies built from the same parts as this one, you'll likely find this too familiar—but energetic, well-acted, and distinguished by artfully artless chatter.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    Monsters University feels not like the work of artists eager to express something but like that of likable pros whose existence depends on getting a rise out the kids. It's like the scares Sully and Mike spring on those sleeping tykes: technically impressive but a job un-anchored to anything more meaningful.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Scherstuhl
    A final twist stamps this as a companion or corrective to The Shape of Things, this time with the man as the monster. This isn't as bracing as that film, but it's far from the horror show LaBute's detractors often accuse him of writing.