Alan Scherstuhl
Select another critic »
For 235 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 61% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 37% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Alan Scherstuhl's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 Enzo Avitabile Music Life
Lowest review score: 0 Saving Lincoln
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 22 out of 235
235 movie reviews
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    That patience of Reichardt's, and her dedication to showing us exclusively the things that we must see, makes the scenes of preparation — boat parking, fertilizer buying — hypnotic and suspenseful and practical all at once.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    For all the hurtling plot, and its occasional workaday scenecraft, Burning Bush proves an engrossing historical drama, low-key but in its final moments devastating.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    A major achievement in sunny wretchedness, Álex de la Iglesia's splatter-comedy Witching & Bitching projectile pukes its outrages at you with a gusto recalling the early days of those (sadly) reformed upchuckers Sam Raimi and Peter Jackson.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Eastwood may never show us his boys discovering themselves under that street lamp, but he gives us a clutch of moments worth treasuring — and mostly without overdoing it.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    There's much in Born to Fly to thrill to, dream with, flinch from: dancers leaping from a great whirling wheel and smacking onto mats far below; dancers ducking and leaping a wickedly spinning I-beam or cinderblock.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    A Walk Among the Tombstones is an uncommonly well-made thriller.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    It's part Live at Birdland, part Boy in the Plastic Bubble, all warmly thrilling.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Alan Scherstuhl
    Poitras shows us history as it happens, scenes of such intimate momentousness that the movie's a must-see piece of work even if, in its totality, it's underwhelming as argument or cinema.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Milos's film pulses with f#*!-it-all abandon and chintzy eastern-Euro club beats.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The performance and filmmaking are invigorating.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film's heady buzz is invigorating, and there are substantial pleasures—and laughs—to be found in all its real-life-just-gone-sour strangeness.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    It's not enough to call this the rare franchise action movie to bring the goods; it's the even rarer one whose creators seem to understand what the goods even are.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Everyone involved at last seems to understand that the mode here is comic. Previous entries suffered from self-important glumness that gummed up the fun whenever the cars weren’t racing.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    A flawed, fascinating testament to a time of discovery in Hollywood: of how stories could be told onscreen, of what great actors might find within themselves, of just what in the hell this country had become in the late-'60s crackup.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Directors Tom Bean and Luke Poling never shy away from the possibility that Plimpton at times was more a personality than a serious writer.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    As in so many Hollywood spectacles, the message and medium are at hopeless odds... Still, the set-up is arresting, the domestic scenes well observed and acted, and the payoffs involving that Roomba toy excellent. Also, a late-film twist isn't a surprise, exactly, but it is delicious.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    After going this far, both in raunchy bad-boyism and mock-apologetic love-us shamelessness, they've effectively blown up their own formula. That's not a bad thing. This is the end; now it's time to try for more.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The doc breezily sketches out the process of casing, smashing, grabbing, escaping, and fencing, not in as much detail as David Samuels's stellar New Yorker piece on the Panthers a couple years back, but with some added pathos.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The most welcome change is the tone. Wadlow has decided he's making a straight-up comedy, and he demonstrates a knack for it.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Exciting and thoughtful, scraped free of the empty provocations of the wicked-pixie Hit-Girl scenes in Kick-Ass, I Declare War offers movie thrills—smartly plotted betrayals and escapes—as well as its share of disappointments.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Passion is pretty good.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Vikingdom trembles with great dumb joy even before we meet the apparently handcrafted hell-dragon that looks like a set of windup chattering teeth combined with a homecoming float.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Complaints that there's too little here about how the Jejune Institute was hatched or what it all may have meant matter little in the face of the one great thing The Institute does offer: a record of the mad invention of the game's masterminds.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    It's just zombies versus an international research station on the wastes of the Red Planet, with all that such a premise promises.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The ending has a surfeit of sugar, but writer-director Arvin Chen's story jaunts along, a cheery rom-com tinged with dream visions and a somewhat daring conceit.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The pained, textured performances of Sevigny and Malone enrich their scenes, but when it ranges away from its leads, The Wait can seem like an anthology of moments rather than a narrative whole, although those moments do accumulate into a mood of chilly, gently surreal isolation.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film surges by, powered by high spirits, well-plotted surprises, and the directors' admirable attention to both the real and romantic.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    Far from a film about sharks sharking and love not working out, this About Last Night revels in friendship, fidelity, and something too rarely seen in the movies today: the idea that being young and black in Los Angeles can be glorious.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    The Visitor is a mess, but a revelatory one, both a ripe, bizarre thriller and a fascinating example of how filmmakers first responded to the interstellar millions stirred up by Spielberg and George Lucas: by thieving the good bits.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Alan Scherstuhl
    An often funny workplace hostage comedy that doesn't demand prior knowledge of the character.

Top Trailers