Alan Scherstuhl
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For 199 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 61% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7.1 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Alan Scherstuhl's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 67
Highest review score: 100 The Case Against 8
Lowest review score: 0 Saving Lincoln
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 19 out of 199
199 movie reviews
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Scherstuhl
    In his second feature, McCarthy shows he's mastered the things we already know scare us onscreen; next, how about something we don't expect?
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    42
    The movie sugars up Robinson's story, and like too many period pieces it summons some vague idea of a warmer, simpler past by bathing everything in thick amber light, as if each scene is one of those preserved mosquitoes that begat the monsters of Jurassic Park.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    The issues at play here are fascinating, but Condon and Singer never let any argument about journalism or the philosophy of free information last longer than a couple ping-ponged lines between master (Assange) and student (Domscheit-Berg).
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    Segal's gearbox gets jammed between recession-era sports drama and brainless comedy, especially as Hart hollers pop-culture punch lines like he's the squirrel sidekick in a CGI kiddo flick.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    Christopher Felver's stumbling hagiography Ferlinghetti: A Rebirth of Wonder does no wrong by its celebrated subject-- but it never illuminates him, either.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    Well-shot and sometimes briefly affecting, especially when Mortimer is given a scene that lasts longer then thirty seconds, the film moves too quickly for its many incidents to have much impact, and what limited power it builds is dissipated by mortifying narration.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    The more typical approach transforms the material, and not for the better—rather than a revelation about how it feels to live her life, this feels like a document of what that life might look like as a conventional, often pokey movie.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    The movie is more effective as sports fantasy than as theology.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    Falcone’s film is an unsteady mix of broad comedy and indie heart, asking us first to roar at Tammy’s ignorance and outrageousness and then to be moved at this lovable misfit muddling toward love, maturity, and a better life.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    Simply put, the care and thoughtfulness that goes into footage-faking has not been applied to the film's script or structure.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    An hour of these repetitive, predictable disasters should wear down all but the most bailout-hating viewers.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    The doc is only about as revealing as a middling magazine article on the subject.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    Swanberg has made an inspiring career out of rejecting the aesthetic crimes of Hollywood. It's dispiriting, then, that he so doggedly indulges in its tradition of male gazing.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    A time-killing kid-flick whose title is an exact summary of its plot.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    The persuasive power of individual moments suggests that director William Eubank has a bright future — and could push himself harder when writing his scripts.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    Too cartoonish to be cathartic, and too ghoulish to be honest fun, Into the Storm is mostly a somewhat uncomfortable sit enlivened by occasional hilariousness.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    As far as escapist fluff laced with totally unnecessary real-world horror goes, The November Man isn't wretched.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    You may feel some anger if you pay to watch this. Or you may not, as Rage offers exactly what you think a Nic Cage movie called Rage would, except maybe for continually inspired lunacy.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    Hilary Brougher's YA-ish horror satire/romance/whatzit Innocence, adapted from Jane Mendelsohn's novel, boasts a wicked setup, some strong performances, several gloriously bloody spook-out images, and a movie-wrecking hypoglycemic listlessness.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Scherstuhl
    "I wanted to make something energetic, optimistic, universal, and real," Bailey announces in voiceover as the movie begins. She's certainly accomplished that, but it's too bad she didn't also aim for vital, illuminating, or consistently compelling.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Alan Scherstuhl
    Jaden is fine at running, jumping, fearful trembling, and affecting steely resolution. He doesn't yet have his father's charisma; perhaps to help him out, dad opted not to bring that charisma to the set.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 30 Alan Scherstuhl
    It doesn't come close to working, but it's sweet that they tried.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Alan Scherstuhl
    Before it descends into Percy Jackson and the Things That Happen in Movies Like This, the adventure at times clicks into the inventive groove of Rick Riordan's Percy Jackson novels, which at their best are touched with the high strangeness of the ancient tales that inspire them.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Alan Scherstuhl
    Some of the movie isn't bad.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 30 Alan Scherstuhl
    Too much of the movie is just people being crabby (or, later, dumb!) in fascinating places, which is less enthralling than the places themselves.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 30 Alan Scherstuhl
    The story feels shapeless, un-tailored, defiantly off the rack.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 30 Alan Scherstuhl
    In the end, all NOW reveals is that talented people did a difficult thing in far-off places — and that now they have a video scrapbook.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Alan Scherstuhl
    Carl Deal and Tia Lessin's scattershot agitprop doc takes the perfidy of the billionaire Koch brothers as its given, offering up montages of Tea Party screamers rather than investigative reporting or rigorous argumentation.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Alan Scherstuhl
    The film is dismayingly formless, every point is made too many times, and there's too little drama or revelation here.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 20 Alan Scherstuhl
    This Hungarian-shot bore is so indistinct it reeks of no place more than Hollywood, where the fascinating specifics of history and legend are ground into universal mush.