Alan Sepinwall

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For 709 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Alan Sepinwall's Scores

Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Breaking Bad: Season 5
Lowest review score: 0 Work It : Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 79 out of 709
709 tv reviews
    • 91 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Sepinwall
    Now, I wouldn't say I loved it. Parts of it I didn't even like. I became quite engaged with what was going on downstairs with the servants, while I found virtually everything having to do with the Granthams (at least the parts unrelated to how they dealt with the staff) a chore to get through.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    And then, near the end of the premiere, something happened that put a dull ache in the pit of my stomach. I won't spoil it here - henceforth, it'll be referred to as The Bad Thing - but it seemed so tonally wrong, so in violation of everything that made the show and the particular characters involved so great, that I knew - I knew - this had been imposed on the production team by the suits at NBC. [5 Oct 2007, p.55]
    • Newark Star-Ledger
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Sepinwall
    The larger problem may be whether there's enough material to cover an entire season.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Sepinwall
    Easy Money was created by Diane Frolov and Andrew Schneider, who wrote for "The Sopranos," and the show in many ways feels like a low-budget HBO (or FX) series.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    Season five is a definite improvement on season four, but only to a point. There aren't as many different stories rattling around, but the show's still so crowded that it has to bounce from scene to scene, subplot to subplot, so quickly that very little gets a chance to breathe.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    It has so much going for it on paper -- notably Mary-Louise Parker as a pot-dealing soccer mom -- but the series' creators remain so pleased with themselves that they're rarely as funny as they obviously think they are. [13 Aug 2007]
    • Newark Star-Ledger
    • 81 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Sepinwall
    Toward the end of the second episode, two characters who have no business acting chummy with each other get in the back of a car together and do exactly that. And rather than make me eager to pop in my screener of the third episode (which I did, eventually), it just killed all the buzz I had built up to that point.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    The show is trying to depict a good cross-section of the city's cop culture. But the scenes with the uniform cops - Ben McKenzie as a young quick study, Michael Cudlitz as his gruff but clever training officer - are just much more vibrant and memorable than anything with the detectives.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Sepinwall
    Last fall, "Studio 60" would have easily been the best new drama; this fall, it's lucky to squeeze into the top five, and a lot of that is based on potential more than what's on screen.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    If you're not expecting much, you'll come away satisfied. But compared to a good episode of "Family Guy" - or even a mediocre "Simpsons" episode - it's pretty thin gruel. [28 Apr 2005]
    • Newark Star-Ledger
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Sepinwall
    The performances by the three lead actresses (and by Amanda Seyfried as Paxton and Tripplehorn's eldest daughter) are so strong, and the nuances of life in such a complicated relationship so endlessly fascinating, that I'll suffer through the rest for a few episodes at a time before Bill's unsettling stare or Roman's calm, criminal sense of entitlement chases me off again.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Sepinwall
    I don't have much new to say about the third season of Jackie, because the show's strengths and weaknesses are the same as they've always been.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Sepinwall
    The premise is pretty standard Joseph Campbell, journey of the hero stuff, but the execution is poor.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Sepinwall
    There's potentially a good show here; the pilot's just a miss.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    There are moments when John Adams stirs up the passion its author clearly had for the subject -- Adams firing off a rifle in the middle of a battle at sea with a British warship, the first public reading of the Declaration, George Washington (David Morse, in the second-best piece of casting other than Giamatti) whispering his oath of office at his inauguration -- but too often it's just as muddy and dull as its subject was accused of being.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    They're flashy and can be briefly shocking or funny or even moving, but the more they go over-the-top, the less impact they have for me.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Sepinwall
    In an ideal world, Katims and Nutter would have taken the best elements from their previous series: the keen insight into teen behavior of "My So-Called Life" and the inventive storytelling of "The X-Files." Unfortunately, Roswell gets it backwards, using both the self-importance of the former and the paper-thin characterization of the latter. [6 Oct 1999, p.73]
    • Newark Star-Ledger
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Sepinwall
    It's a watered-down, TV version of the familiar tale, as bland and inoffensive as possible.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Sepinwall
    I don't know that there's a long-running series here--even the pilot runs out of steam before the end--but I did laugh several times.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    It’s a bland, interchangeable bunch, with most of them having a single identifiable trait.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Sepinwall
    It's not a great sitcom, not even really a good one, and the strain of trying to sell such mediocre material will no doubt get to Garrett in a few weeks, but it's still vastly better than its companion show.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Sepinwall
    There's some amusing material on the margins of the show--the guys use OnStar to settle a debate about the lyrics to a song on the radio, Dougie admits his marriage isn't perfect and his wife "sometimes she gets up in the middle of the night and bakes in her sleep"--but outside of Jerry Minor's winning performance as the overextended but always cheerful Aubrey, it's completely forgettable.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    It's not a bad show, but the mechanics of how they're going to abduct their latest target are far less engaging than how the team interacts with each other and how each member fights his or her compulsions.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Sepinwall
    What you do after surviving the end of the world as you know it is an intriguing premise, and when "Jericho" sticks close to that, it's one of this season's more promising new dramas.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Sepinwall
    Damages offers two superb performances by old pros Glenn Close and Ted Danson.... One thing it doesn't have: a compelling main character. It's a doughnut show: lots of sweet, satisfying goodness around the edges, nothing in the middle.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    It wants to be a smart-aleck comedy/thriller hybrid in the spirit of Elmore Leonard and Carl Hiaasen, but the jokes are rarely clever enough and the thrills rarely exciting enough.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 58 Alan Sepinwall
    There's enough strong raw material on hand that Ray Donovan could eventually be built into something great. Right now, though, it's raw material in search of a series.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Sepinwall
    One of the better -- if stranger -- comedy debuts the networks have put out this year.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Alan Sepinwall
    Doherty and Milano, together with some silly dialogue and plots, promise some good campy fun. The problems come whenever their third sibling, played by Holly Marie Combs ("Picket Fences"), is on screen. You see, Combs can actually act, and whenever she starts to emote, she gives the trashy proceedings a bit more reality than they can handle. [7 Oct 1998, p.39]
    • Newark Star-Ledger
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Alan Sepinwall
    The disappointing new project from "Arrested Development" creator Mitchell Hurwitz is mainly a reminder of how much the "Arrested" cast--several of whom provide voice work here--added to that show.

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