Alan Sepinwall
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For 625 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Alan Sepinwall's Scores

Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 24: Season 2
Lowest review score: 0 Work It : Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 74 out of 625
625 tv reviews
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    It's an odd little show, often more David Lynch than David Milch, and after three episodes I'm still not sure I understand it all.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    I like her a lot, but the shaggy-dog nature of the storytelling... made the comedy miss about as often as it hit for me.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    As epic as Reggie vs. Billy or Billy vs. George were on the sports pages in the summer of Sam, it doesn't feel like quite enough to fill eight hours of scripted drama.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    Even though the performances, the writing, directing, etc., are uniformly strong, The Riches is just too unpleasant to make a weekly commitment to.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    There's nothing annoying about it, but there's also nothing memorable.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    The sex is all implied rather than shown, as is much of the drug use. It's a very PG-13 approach to potentially R-rated subject matter--and that's the problem.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    Reaper takes several steps back--and a few steps sideways--suggesting a drunken all-nighter may be in order, if it hasn't happened already.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    It wants to be a smart-aleck comedy/thriller hybrid in the spirit of Elmore Leonard and Carl Hiaasen, but the jokes are rarely clever enough and the thrills rarely exciting enough.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    Some of the performances are good, particularly by Deschanel (who gets to sing near the end, good news for anyone who saw "Elf"), McDonough and Cumming, but solid acting and monkeys flying out of, um, someplace aren't enough to justify spending six hours over three nights on a labored attempt to make a classic children's story seem grown-up and cool.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    There are moments when John Adams stirs up the passion its author clearly had for the subject -- Adams firing off a rifle in the middle of a battle at sea with a British warship, the first public reading of the Declaration, George Washington (David Morse, in the second-best piece of casting other than Giamatti) whispering his oath of office at his inauguration -- but too often it's just as muddy and dull as its subject was accused of being.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    The Flashpoint pilot is competent, but very retro (there's an extended sequence of the team driving to a crisis point with their sirens blaring, the sort of thing that went out 15 years ago) and fairly dull.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    While the jokes may be funnier than "King" has been in a long time, the new show also feels more uneven and strained.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    It's not a bad show, but the mechanics of how they're going to abduct their latest target are far less engaging than how the team interacts with each other and how each member fights his or her compulsions.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    Cleveland isn’t an inherently interesting, or, worse, funny, character. His presence allows the writers (many of them white like Henry and Appel) to tell meta jokes about white people in Hollywood producing entertainment for a black audience, and occasionally some of the racial humor lands.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    If Lie to Me wants to elevate itself above all the other shows like it, it not only needs to beef up the quality of its mysteries, but to spend more time focusing on these unexpected downsides of the power to live a life of absolute truths.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    It’s a bland, interchangeable bunch, with most of them having a single identifiable trait.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    They're flashy and can be briefly shocking or funny or even moving, but the more they go over-the-top, the less impact they have for me.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    V has to rise and fall on its story and its characters. Based on the pilot, both of those areas are spotty.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    If Guggenheim can deepen the personalities and show how the flash forward really impacted them, then they might have a show here. Because right now, there's an interesting idea, some good production values and a cool cliffhanger, and not much else.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    Defying Gravity--an international production with American actors--feels too slight, or silly, to treat as anything but the cheap, disposable summer programming it is.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    Right now, it's a work in progress at best.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    Where other law shows tend to have one side view the other as the embodiment of evil, here we see that these two are old friends from law school who enjoy the battle of wits even as they're convinced they're on the right side of every fight. On those occasions when The Whole Truth slows down to just let those two bounce off each other, it's a show I almost want to watch. But the rest of it is too fast, and too thin, to bother with.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    The show is trying to depict a good cross-section of the city's cop culture. But the scenes with the uniform cops - Ben McKenzie as a young quick study, Michael Cudlitz as his gruff but clever training officer - are just much more vibrant and memorable than anything with the detectives.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    There aren't any particularly wince-inducing moments, but nor are the various grabs for the heartstrings as successful as they are when "Grey's" is at its best. No lows, but no highs, either.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    There are some likable actors here, and funny moments here and there, but the two episodes I've seen suggest a show not in the league of the established comedies NBC has on that night.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    It's a likable cast and the show seems a potentially good companion to "HIMYM" (these characters even hang out in a bar that looks a bit like the "HIMYM" bar shifted 90 degrees), but there's one problem: It's not especially funny. Not yet, anyway.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    Season five is a definite improvement on season four, but only to a point. There aren't as many different stories rattling around, but the show's still so crowded that it has to bounce from scene to scene, subplot to subplot, so quickly that very little gets a chance to breathe.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    The series as a whole seems much more interested in the love triangle involving Arthur, his bravest knight Leontes (Philip Winchester) and the beautiful Guinevere (Tamsin Egerton) than in actually showing the growth of a king. It doesn't help that parts of that story are bizarrely anachronistic.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    Taylor does a strong job of showcasing the show's main set, a recreation of the original Club, and several of the musical numbers (sometimes the Bunnies get to sing, and other times the show casts actors to play '60s musicians like Ike & Tina Turner) really pop. But the show's attempts at social relevance ring hollow, and the main plot leans too heavily on the wooden Cibrian.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Alan Sepinwall
    There's no there there. Annie's missions each week are forgettable, and most seem to revolve around Annie seeming to get too personally invested, only for her instincts to be proven right over her more jaded colleagues.