Amy Nicholson
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For 208 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 55% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 44% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Amy Nicholson's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 The Overnighters
Lowest review score: 0 3 Geezers!
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 85 out of 208
  2. Negative: 37 out of 208
208 movie reviews
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    Show 'Em What You're Made Of convincingly argues that these boy-men have something to say about the fickleness of fate — something they knew more about as young men than any of the cynics who dismissed them for dancing in unison. The hardest part will be convincing people to listen.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    Gold is merely the conduit for the film's real focus: Like his own reviews, City of Gold is a love letter to L.A.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    The Voices is a perfect film that's hard to watch.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    Everly has the heaving, bloody bosoms of an exploitation flick, yet Hayek gives the character powerful dignity. She's no victim, nor an off-the-shelf "strong woman."
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    There's no honor among thieves, but there is dignity in Focus's ambition. And if the final film is more vodka ad than all-time classic, there's still no shame in pouring another cocktail and rewinding the tape.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    There's something fearlessly uncool about the film, which suffers mostly from being made 30 years too late.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    When the violence gets unbearable, take comfort in the troop of trainers on the sidelines who prove that, for now, man and beast still make a good team.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    The flick, written by debut screenwriter James McFarland, is twisty, clever, and totally Nineties.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    Roar is a thrilling bore, an inanity with actual peril in every scene.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    The cast keeps us invested in Filly's furious resurrection.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    Chris Matheson's script focuses its energy on small, wickedly funny gags, half of which Robinson seems to have sputtered out as improv.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    Évocateur: The Morton Downey Jr. Movie is as fair a portrayal the weak-chinned warrior will get — and fairer than he deserves.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    Justin McMillan and Christopher Nelius' rah-rah documentary is most alive when it unearths old '80s footage of the friends partying it up with blond groupies — talk about thrilling curves.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    Two hours of femmepowering wish fulfillment.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    Eclipse has its cheesecake and eats it, too.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    An odd little film that aims only to please itself.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    The best parts of Sparling's script play like an absurdist snuff film.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    Like Todd Haynes' "I'm Not There"-which never once came out and said the name "Bob Dylan"-Nowhere Boy bites its tongue and refuses to say "The Beatles."
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    In its small moments, say when Walhberg sighs that his robe misspells "Micky," The Fighter feels clued-in to the very small, very tough world of a man trying to make his way out of his block-and after getting to know his family, you want to help him pack his bags.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    Country Strong is a charmer that makes you forgive all of its false notes simply because the talent plays them with conviction.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    There's plenty of atmosphere and awe, even if it's in the service of a story that starts rote and finds its sea legs only when half the divers have sunk their bones to Davy Jones.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    Jones delivers her line readings so robotically that even her truths sound like lies. She's got the look of a Hitchcock blonde, and the movements of a deer in the headlights. Even her kisses look fake.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    Is the result - a slapstick, bizarro melodrama where Ferrell plays the Mexican born and bred scion of a wealthy farmer - meant more for Spanish speakers or stoned and giggly Americans? It's a tough call.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    Step Up Revolution has again found some of the most kinetic talents in the country.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Amy Nicholson
    This is a curio that demands to be seen.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Amy Nicholson
    For all its empathy and equilibrium, The East has nowhere to go after the script backs itself into a corner.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Amy Nicholson
    Neither disposable nor a long-lost masterpiece, she might not be loved by all the boys, but she's still worth a Friday night date.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Amy Nicholson
    Every bit of it is more advanced: The actors are better, the plot is tighter, the special effects sleeker, the messages more heartfelt. Yet it lacks Verhoeven's bloody, biting scream.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Amy Nicholson
    If only Shepard's movie lived up to his leading man. It's merely a frame for a character portrait, with Shepard's camera screwing our eyes to Law's performance and pasting in supporting actors and situations for no larger purpose than to see his reaction to them.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Amy Nicholson
    Land Ho! feints toward pathos and perversity, only to decide that it's better off giving us abridged, postcard emotions.

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