Andrew O'Hehir

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For 1,483 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Andrew O'Hehir's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 While We're Young
Lowest review score: 0 The Replacements
Score distribution:
1483 movie reviews
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    This delicious little period piece from Spanish writer-director Pablo Berger is like one of those really expensive chocolates, where you start out expecting a brief sugar buzz and end up surprised by the sophistication and delicacy of the flavor.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Director Michel Hazanavicius captures the jet-age atmosphere, form-fitting wardrobes, jazz-ethnic soundtrack and bouffant hairdos of JFK/de Gaulle-era espionage films in perfect detail, but it's Dujardin's performance as the suave, confident and utterly clueless Hubert Bonisseur de la Bath (to Francophones, a name that drips with phony aristocratic pretension) that gives "OSS 117" its edge.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    I found the film powerfully erotic, although it has minimal nudity and no explicit sex.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    If Land of Plenty isn't always elegant, it has the inexpressible aura of mystery and wonder that exemplifies his best work. Fans will feel echoes of both "Paris, Texas" and "The State of Things" here. Like those movies, this one is less an angry critique than a sad meditation on the American dream, something Wim Wenders understands well and has never been able to resist.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    I think the movie is so restrained, and holds back so much on conventional plot and characterization, that its emotional impact is severely blunted. Nolte is excellent, I suppose, but we've seen this damaged-American-dude shtick from him before.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Captures the awful intimacy and the grimy, second-rate quality of the Northern Ireland conflict in resonant fashion.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Of course, the very existence of someone like Willmott -- a black university professor who can make an angry, ruthless satire about American racism with impunity -- suggests that we're still a long way from living in the CSA.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    May not be entirely original or entirely successful, but it's definitely fun to watch.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    I found The Matrix Reloaded so exhilarating. It's a sadder, wiser, more grown-up movie than its predecessor. It was made, one might almost say, for a sadder, wiser, more grown-up world.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Ted
    In a universe of Hollywood comedies that seem determined to insult the audience and pander to the basest form of post-adolescent fantasy, Ted feels almost sophisticated.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Any thriller from first-time directors that starts out with a couple of teenagers in a Texas diner talking about legendary pulp novelist Jim Thompson has a super-steep hill to climb. Here’s what I can say for Bad Turn Worse... It may not make it all the way up that steep slope, but the effort is pretty doggone entertaining.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Baghead is a kick in the pants.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    5x2
    In the end I respected 5x2 more than I loved it. As we move backward in time, the distance between audience and characters inevitably widens -- we know what's going to happen and they don't -- and I found the effect a little astringent.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Something of a gigantic goof, perpetrated by Penn and Herzog -- and the goofees included much of the entertainment media, people in the film business, the Scottish authorities and (I think) even some of the film's cast.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Centurion has its moments of manly cornpone camaraderie and certainly isn't blazingly original, but it offers riveting storytelling, gorgeous cinematography and scenery, loads of gore, and a politically complicated history lesson.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    The Help definitely worked on me as a consummate tear-jerker with a terrific cast, and it's pretty much the summer's only decent Hollywood drama.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Thoroughly wonderful.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lee Harvey Oswald's guilt or innocence or accomplices are not the point of the film; Stone is more interested in the fact that much about the Kennedy murder is now so shrouded in myth and mystification as to be permanently unknowable, and that that fact alone has gnawed away at the self-confidence of middle-class white America ever since.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This film is an inevitable product of our age, and enjoyable, right up to whatever your ickiness threshold is.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    Matsumoto isn't the first Japanese director to go all meta on the superhero tradition (consider also Takashi Miike's 2004 "Zebraman"), but this work of improbable lunacy may well max out the genre.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a movie of tremendous visual daring, magnificent special-effects work and surprising moral gravity.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Despite his reliance on visual cliché, Trajkov mines a rich vein of morbid Slavic comedy, and his young characters have an appetite for adventure that's thoroughly unfake.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Utterly delightful.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    What emerges in the end actually is surprisingly consistent and coherent, if you pay close attention to the most important passages of Kirk’s self-serving narrative and steer through all the denials and reversals and irrelevant tangents.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    If it's too subtle (and too similar to several other low-key indie romcoms) to make a big splash, it's got lovely performances and really builds strength as it goes along.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lots of movies about the Middle Ages can do the mud and blood -- though we sure see a lot of both here -- but in this movie it's like Refn has ripped you out of time and dropped you there.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    There are a number of terrific production numbers in Lucy, basically violent action scenes that border on slapstick, and as long as we agree in advance that the “science” in this movie goes beyond pseudo into total B.S., I believe you will leave satisfied.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    I simultaneously want to endorse its ambition and nerve and report that it's a very mixed bag.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    These people can behave well or poorly, but they were already bugs on the windshield of life before their unhappy collision.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's hilarious, and contains some of Mamet's best dialogue. And that somehow, by making a racist, murderous, Everycreep his protagonist, Mamet is able to produce some of his most penetrating psychological and spiritual insights.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Conveys an intense sculptural loveliness with something moving beneath it, maybe a sense of menace. And it's leavened, like once per hour, with a teeny dash of humor. This isn't nearly as immediately likable or showy as "Cremaster 3," but in a quiet way just as spectacular.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The morbid and gripping war film Blessed by Fire, from the Argentine filmmaker Tristán Bauer, is well worth a look.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Ultimately, though, it's a little schizo, like a depressed dude in a clown suit, or a Theodore Dreiser novel hopped up on not enough happy pills.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    His final scenes with Lucy and with his own dad are both surprising and shattering, and I was left humbled by the film's honesty.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    You're just sitting there, somewhere between mildly amused and fairly bored, watching the filmmakers squander Hollywood's most eccentric character actor and a lot of very fine specimens of the order Rodentia.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Completely deranged, and the portrait it paints of our beloved country depicts a dangerous place full of neurotics and obsessives. But lots of fun, with porn, booze, backyard barbecues and elaborate revenge schemes!
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is the kind of movie where most people know what they want and are pretty sure what they will get, that being “more of the same, please.”
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The great strength and great weakness of the Yes Men, not to put too fine a point on it, is that they’re a couple of dorks. Their props, costumes and supporting materials are invariably crude – but they are sincere and unafraid, or at least unafraid enough to brazen it out.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew O'Hehir
    Rarely has a film with such a great cast and so many moments of terrific writing and such high dramatic goals been so messy and disorganized and fundamentally bad.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lomborg has clearly been stung by the suggestion that he's a front man for know-nothingism, and Cool It is an agreeable and partly successful attempt to repair his image.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Despite its schizophrenic nature and often disagreeable characteristics, Broken English has flashes of something. You might say it has an integrity of purpose, if not of execution.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Above all a cracking good yarn that earns its laughter, its wonder and its tears.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A fever dream about an aging, grasping, neurotic artist who brings his disastrous personal life, thinly veiled, into his work and ends up as a grotesque caricature of himself, alienating everyone who ever loved him.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is definitely a formula movie, lovingly and even obsessively so, made by someone who obviously enjoyed “American Pie” and numerous other raunchy-sweet teen sex comedies of the ’90s, and wished they existed for girls.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Full of imaginative, outrageous and egregiously insulting 3-D gags.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    I enjoyed it immensely, flat-footed dialogue and implausible situations and all. Which doesn't stop me from believing that in its totality Secretariat is a work of creepy, half-hilarious master-race propaganda almost worthy of Leni Riefenstahl, and all the more effective because it presents as a family-friendly yarn about a nice lady and her horse.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    An important human and artistic testament -- a calm meditation on something no one can consider calmly.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    For me, the meticulous style, the fascination with ritualized (and ludicrous) violence and the film-geek self-referentiality all seem like markers of a film made by a young man, for other young men. If I were 23, and full to the brim with dark-hearted existentialism, I might love it too.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    While Keating's agenda is clearly hostile, and Giuliani's political committee is eagerly trying to do counter-propaganda, this isn't a campaign of character assassination or innuendo, but rather a dutifully constructed biographical film about a tremendously skilled prosecutor and politician.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    What results is a patchy, uncertain motion picture, full of incidents and images but fundamentally unfocused and superficial.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Stephen King reportedly loathed the liberties Kubrick and co-writer Diane Johnson took with his story, but King's ur-villain, the emasculated husband from hell, has never been more clearly presented on-screen.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a performance of great subtlety, not a caustic caricature: Rat (Cusack) still believes in something, probably still in some Platonic ideal of poetic possibility.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Seeing these four actors launching Reza's zingers at each other at high speed is pretty much worth the price of admission all by itself, and one thing you always know about Polanski is that he won't waste your time.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Despite the lurid content, this is a beautifully made film that reaches for moral seriousness and resists facile judgments.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    For me the breakthrough in At Any Price comes from 59-year-old Dennis Quaid, cementing his character-actor renaissance with what may be the nastiest role of his career.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A lean, clean killing machine that supplies some dark, late-summer thrills and chills and breathes new life into a seemingly extinct franchise.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    If Elysium isn’t the post-millennial sci-fi masterpiece I was hoping for, it has tremendous resonance and is pretty doggone good for its category.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Gandini makes it seem as if the nation of Dante and Fellini has been conquered by "Girls Gone Wild." As hyperbolic cases go, that's a pretty delicious one, but it's not quite true yet.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    The good news is that Alfredson finds his footing in The Girl Who Kicked the Hornet's Nest and delivers a rousing, grueling, almost operatically scaled finale to the series.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Perhaps understandably, these artifacts of a vastly different ideological and economic era -- have become kitsch objects, the focus of a half-horrified nostalgia, in the midst of the feverish Chinese boom.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Taken on its own terms The Wolverine is the cleanest, least pretentious and most satisfying superhero movie of the summer.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    But if the storytelling is murky, the filmmaking is stunning and, more important, the passion for this city -- its people and landscape -- is pure.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This isn’t a perfect movie, but it might be the perfect summer movie for 2015.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Feig’s Ghostbusters is a goofy, free-floating romp with an anarchic spirit of its own, a fresh set of scares and laffs and a moderate dose of girl power that is unlikely to seem confrontational to anyone beyond the most confirmed basement-dwelling Gamergate troll.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a warm, intelligent and highly contemporary comedy with just the right amount of edge, a terrific ensemble cast and a big, fuzzy golden retriever ready to knock you down and lick you like a giant lollipop.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    9
    Actually, the problem with wunderkind director Shane Acker's "stitchpunk" animated fantasy 9 isn't so much that it bears a sped-up, dumbed-down resemblance to "The Lord of the Rings," although it does. It's more that Acker's dark and whimsical creation, so clearly in the tradition of his mentor Tim Burton, is wondrous to behold but offers only an indifferent and generic mishmash of quest fantasy and post-apocalyptic science fiction when it comes to story.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Masterfully paced and constructed, and the performances are memorable.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    This film stands as an intimate, terrifying document that renders an incomprehensible slice of recent history in human terms.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A clean and agreeable biopic that restores some vitality to a fascinating episode in 20th-century cultural and political history.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Reconstruction has a poetic sensibility, as well as an old-fashioned Continental appetite for romance, that makes it distinctive.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Nolfi's dialogue is lean and often funny, while Damon and Blunt play appealing and clearly delineated characters drawn together by the kind of old-fashioned romantic passion you don't often see in contemporary movies.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew O'Hehir
    Edward Norton's dopey directorial debut gives interfaith romance a bad name.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    There's a vivid comedy to this family's emotional state of siege, an easy confidence to Honoré's camerawork, and plenty of beautiful bodies.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    What is the point of making a movie that’s just like the dopiest, broadest and most reductive grade of guy-oriented comedy, except with women?
    • 60 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    A masterful accomplishment...teems with its own sense of life, crackles with daring, walks the tightrope between satire and pathos with a rare assuredness.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The wonder of Tomorrowland – and with all its flaws and its hidebound Disney formula, it really is wonderful – is that Bird’s tale of nostalgia for the lost future manages to recapture some of that original, optimistic meaning without losing sight of the newer and darker one.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It’s an enormous relief to have a lightweight but non-insulting date movie to recommend in this arid season. This isn’t a movie that requires your full attention at every second – although when Dyrholm and Brosnan are on-screen, you won’t be able to look away – but it’s a nifty entertainment that’s always easy on the eyes and gains just a bit of dramatic weight as it moves forward.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    RED
    All those guys are a blast, and the dark-hearted idiocy of Red is mostly quite enjoyable.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    If you're bored by the action scenes or the love story or the dopey domestic comedy, just wait three minutes for something else to come along - and whoever you are, you won't be bored by the musical numbers!
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    When Vikram Gandhi set out to become a guru, he didn't expect to really become a guru. But that's what happens in his slippery, ambiguous, tense and finally moving Kumaré, which is officially termed a documentary but could also be considered as the video corollary to a thorny work of performance art.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    I suppose the perfect ending to the chapter would be to report that The Beaver is a masterpiece. It isn't quite, but it does offer an astonishing and resonant performance by Gibson, who spends most of the movie playing two simultaneous characters, often in the same shot.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's perhaps most remarkable as a sweet, mysterious portrait of pre-flood New Orleans, which Almereyda not incorrectly portrays as a land of wandering, uncertain souls.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a small film, but it moved me and made me angry. Both reactions, in this context, are worthwhile.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lone Survivor has no politics in the sense that it presents a more or less factual story about Luttrell and his comrades trying to fight their way out against overwhelming odds, and tells the truth that most of them didn’t make it. But the visual symbolism and the iconography of this movie are not apolitical or ideologically neutral at all.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Even as this film unravels into incoherent, self-justifying moral instruction, it never becomes boring to watch.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    With the genial pairing of Jennifer Aniston as a rich guy’s trophy wife and John Hawkes as a low-rent criminal at the center of a colorful cast and a pitch-perfect rendering of caste-divided Detroit, Life of Crime is a bittersweet end-of-summer surprise.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A handsome and well-acted film -- if you like that bitten-off, half-Hemingway style -- but also a grim, emotionally strangled one with a strong sadistic current, no genuinely likable characters and almost no humor.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Add Christopher Walken, giving one of his patented demented performances as a Kurtz-esque mining tycoon deep in the Amazon jungle, along with some vague Hollywood politics about labor exploitation, and The Rundown is far too cheerful and good-hearted to be terrible.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A rousing old-fashioned yarn with numerous exciting set-pieces and an uncomplicated hero you root for all the way through. It’s entertaining throughout and made with a high level of technical skill. If made 40 years ago, it would have been a leading Oscar contender and a huge hit, whereas today it’s a bit “meh” in both categories
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Copying Beethoven has an ace up its sleeve: the wonder and drama of the Ninth Symphony itself (heard here in Bernard Haitink's tremendous 1996 recording with the Royal Concertgebouw).
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Nights and Weekends knocked me out when I saw it last March at the South by Southwest festival in Austin, Texas; I wrote at the time that it offered exactly the "prickly, flawed, urgent SXSW experience I'd been waiting for."
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Tower Heist is funny in the way of so many Hollywood comedies, meaning that individual scenes are often crisply written and played, but the whole doesn't add up to anything.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    If I had the power to turn back time and start the tortuous production process that led to the “Hobbit” trilogy over again, with a different director in charge and a completely different approach, I would do it. But that’s precisely the problem with the One Ring, right? Once you put it on you are changed, and those changes cannot be undone.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    I feel prodigious emotion underneath the pretty, preserved features of The Ballad of Jack and Rose, channeled into a vehicle that's a half-successful imitation of "You Can Count on Me" or "In the Bedroom."
    • 59 Metascore
    • 20 Andrew O'Hehir
    J. Edgar turns out to be one of the worst ideas anybody's ever had, a mendacious, muddled, sub-mediocre mess that turns some of the most explosive episodes of the 20th century into bad domestic melodrama and refuses to take any clear position on one of American history's most controversial figures.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is an ambling, relaxed talking-head docu in the grand European style.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Change of Plans may not be earth-shattering cinema, but it's masterfully structured and edited (by Sylvie Landra) with a first-rate cast.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    An exhaustive, exciting and ultimately exhausting history of how that white powder, and the Colombian crime lords who imported it by the hundreds of kilos, transformed the culture and economy of Miami, for good and for ill.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    An intriguing blend of mainstream audience-pleaser and a more subtle, even intellectual agenda.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Once again, the filmmaker gets incredibly wobbly at the end of his story, and his resolution of both the alien incursion and of Graham's crisis of faith feels more like a cheap trick than the product of a genuine belief in anything at all.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Warm Bodies is more a mild-mannered, emo-flavored romcom than a zombie movie. It has some tepid action scenes, a few swatches of genuine humor and a general spirit of cheerfulness, especially considering it depicts a future in which civilization has been destroyed.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Investigative journalist Donal MacIntyre's film is fairly standard British TV product, closer to a glorified "60 Minutes" segment then to cinematic art. But never mind -- its subject is, as he might say, feckin' amazing.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Once you get past an awkward and artificial beginning and roll with the movie’s crazy rhythm, The Dead Lands is also a blast, and one that delivers an unexpected emotional wallop along with gore, thrills and spectacular scenery.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Savages is enjoyable in a way that's almost but not quite intentional camp; it's like eating a dinner made by a 7-year-old, with cake for every course, interspersed with Jell-O, Pepperidge Farm goldfish and chocolate sprinkles.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    Begins as pseudo-realism before descending into weird and mangled wank-job fantasy.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Jurassic World unquestionably “delivers.” It feels like a hit; it offers a professionally crafted blend of blandness, predictability, watered-down cultural commentary and manufactured excitement.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Mostly it's got a barely tolerable level of metaness.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's highly enjoyable even if (like me) you're not much of a Potterphile.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew O'Hehir
    This might be the edgiest film of the year -- if the year were 1982.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's an ambitious, uneven, surprisingly talky melodrama.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    As enjoyable as Close is, Heights as a whole is a mannered simulation that only occasionally and accidentally feels like real New York life.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    What If could be the breakthrough film that underappreciated Canadian director Michael Dowse (“Goon” and “It’s All Gone Pete Tong”) has been waiting for, and at any rate it’s a sparkling screwball highball, perfect for a late-summer weekend.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Alternately winsome and irritating documentary.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Director Ian Allen (a longtime playwright and stage director) has lovingly re-created the look and indeed narrative style of silent film -- and he's from Salt Lake City, so if he says Mormons are vampires with hypnotic powers, who am I to argue? I suppose this is a one-note joke, more in the style of '70s avant-garde camp than anything else. But, hey, at least it's a funny joke.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    I'm still not quite sure why it's so compelling. I think this movie's appeal is overdetermined, as we used to say in sophomore Marxist-theory class, meaning that it derives from so many sources you can't keep track of them all.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Amira & Sam came along and swept me off my feet, like Fabio riding a stallion. It largely works thanks to Starr and Shihabi, a pair of likable and restrained actors who build slowly from tangible discomfort toward an unexpected passionate chemistry.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a wonderful, passionate, well-nigh unforgettable adaptation of a great novel about the horrors of love, and the wonderful fact that at least some of us live through it and come back for more.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    As with any other movie, it’s all a question of what attitude you carry into the theater, and whether you’re prepared to go where Malick wants to take you. All I can tell you is that once I surrendered to the ebb and flow of Lubezki’s images, the elegiac and almost anti-narrative mode, the sweet-sad blend of romance, eroticism and tragedy and the hypnotic score – which mixes contemporary electronic pop with Berlioz, Wagner, Tchaikovsky, Henryk Górecki and Arvo Pärt – I really never wanted it to stop.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    May frustrate as many viewers as it delights (if not more) and it is almost relentlessly depressing, but it's also a principled, sharply realistic film that captures a highly convincing vision of Middle America.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A lovely, faintly sinister travelogue.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew O'Hehir
    Stoker, which plays something like a remake of “The Addams Family” mixed with “The Paperboy” — but without the laughs of either – belongs in a special category of movie badness, or perhaps two different but overlapping categories. It’s a visually striking but fundamentally terrible film made by a good or (some would say) great director.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    I still have unanswered moral questions about the film -- unanswered because unanswerable, I suspect -- but it's a beautiful, wrenching, horrifying work of cinema, unlike anything I have ever seen or will see again.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Although the character of Aladeen seems awfully predictable by Baron Cohen standards, the movie itself veers from one hilarious, absurd and patently offensive setup to the next.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    May be a bit too grim and claustrophobic to become a certifiable summer blockbuster, but it's a pulse-pounding thriller that brings one of the Cold War's darkest and deadliest episodes to the big screen.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    When you watch Greenwald's barrage of pirated Fox News footage -- his filmmaking techniques are clearly testing the outer limits of the "fair use" doctrine, and may yet land him in court -- it's an overwhelming experience well beyond the hoot-inducing moments.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's essentially a mishmash of random ingredients, not very systematically presented and skewed to flatter its audience's presumed enlightenment.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    One of the better multiplex options of this legendarily dismal summer.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    As this wry, dry and glittering near-masterpiece proclaims, life is full of wrongness, but also full of mystery and wonder.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lawless offers a compelling, gruesome and instructive time-travel exercise.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Loud, trashy, implausible and exciting, The Fast and the Furious may not have much of a brain, but it's definitely got a pulse.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    I'm afraid that whoever it was in the New York Film Critics Circle who voted for The Hobbit as best animated film had a point. And so did the people who suspected that this whole thing was a bad idea.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Juliette Lewis makes Aurora Borealis into a funnier, richer, more powerful film than it has any reason to be.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Disney World, in this incoherent but often amazing work of American psychodrama, has a lot in common with the Overlook Hotel of “The Shining,” the Venice of “Death in Venice” and the booze-soaked Cuernavaca of “Under the Volcano.” It’s a zone of existential dread, the place where masculine dreams go to die, the place where the unburied ghosts of civilization rise up like Mouse-eared, three-fingered zombies and bite us in the ass.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    I found it gorgeous, opaque and disturbing in roughly equal portions, but it was a riveting experience all the way through.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Unsurprisingly, the camerawork in Lila Says is spectacular.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This third-act redemption raises Towelhead several notches, but it still ends up feeling like a well-acted and well-intentioned after-school special, a long way from the vividness and texture of Ball's television work.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    The hit-to-miss gag ratio is atrocious, and we spend most of the movie hanging out with these borderline-agreeable characters, waiting for something to happen.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew O'Hehir
    Director Cook and screenwriter Anthony Frewin were both intimates of the real Kubrick, which I guess counts for something. But for what, exactly? Does it uniquely qualify them to make a mean-spirited, trashy and intermittently funny film about a guy who wasn't Kubrick?
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A deviously engineered parasite that'll crawl under your skin and live in your nervous system for a while if you give it half a chance.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    At the very least, this implausible trifecta displays an abundantly talented new filmmaker who has risked everything, including the prospect that we may get sick of him immediately. If you care about the remaining possibilities of American movies, then this one – well, one of the three, anyway! – is a must-see.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Alternately comic and terrifying, "Woman/Gun/Noodle" is a dazzling act of transliteration that may not require knowledge of the original film.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Let me come clean right now and tell you that I enjoyed The Intouchables quite a bit. If you're looking for a lightweight summer change of pace, with just a smidgen of Continental flair, here it is.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Branagh's completely at home in this kind of inflated family drama, of course, and the three guys yell, sulk and brood in their ridiculous costumes to fine effect.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is going to be a notorious film that young audiences will be daring themselves to see, but it's actually funnier, darker and more troubling before it turns into a carnival of repeated dismemberment.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's almost as lame-brained as any Hollywood blockbuster, if prettier and more pretentious.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    There’s a freshness and an unjaded quality to almost every scene that makes you want to keep watching.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    Finally, at the risk of seeming provincial, why is it OK that some Canadian has made a movie set in Ireland with no Irish people among the principal cast?
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Unlike most issue-oriented documentaries about the abundant idiocy of the human species and the imminent demise of our planet, Mark S. Hall's Sushi: The Global Catch offers foodies and sushi buffs a refreshing palate-cleanser before the parade of experts and the dire news reports.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    With its intelligence, compassion, human terror and sheer loveliness, Candy is a winner despite the well-worn path it treads.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    García, previously the director of "Mother and Child," "Passengers" and numerous TV episodes (and the son of Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez), never feels entirely comfortable with the period or location, but for all its limitations Albert Nobbs has a puzzling undertow, and gets more involving the longer you stick with it.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    So stylized and slow-moving (even at a spare 75 minutes) that you may have trouble adapting to its hypnotic rhythms -- but if you can, there are sumptuous visual rewards to be found, plus the faintest emotional uptick right at the end.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Southpaw is a tremendous accomplishment of mainstream cinematic craft, a near-perfect match of director, material and star.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    If you liked "Rocky Balboa" you should be in good shape, since it's exactly the same movie, just aimed at a teeny-tiny-bit younger demographic and with an affectless leading man who avoids hambone acting by not acting at all.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Sarin and Sonam also lift the veil on potentially explosive divisions within the Tibetan exile community, which is torn between spiritual and cultural loyalty to the Dalai Lama and a widespread longing for true independence. (The filmmakers clearly belong to the pro-independence camp.)
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Yes, yes, yes, Downey is blasé, intelligent and hilarious as Tony Stark -- what do you expect me to say? -- but I'm convinced that sticking with this character much longer won't be good for him.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A fun, silly, kid-friendly summer popcorn entertainment.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It almost continuously gets darker, funnier and edgier as it goes along.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    I resisted this derivative mishmash of classic fairytale and modern epic fantasy for as long as I could, but ultimately it swept me up into its geeky but manly embrace and carried me away on a white charger.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a brash, lightweight backstage comedy that looks lovely, doesn't insult its audience and uses its stars, both young and old, to terrific effect.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The Last Kiss is more a capable-craftsman film than a work of genuine dramatic insight, but here and there it opens a window onto the terror and wonder of grown-up life, one its characters don't especially want to look through.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    As inconsequential and virtually indistinguishable sub-Judd Apatow white-boy comedies fueled by prison-rape gags and pants-pissing anxiety around black people go, Horrible Bosses is pretty solid entertainment.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Fundamentally, it's a well-executed formula movie, perfect for first-date couples or miscellaneous group outings.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    A marvelously compressed and immaculately constructed work.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Not only is War Dogs a surprisingly well-told tale in the classic American rags-to-riches-to-rags mode. It’s also a mordant morality fable with a genuine heart of darkness. (Plus, it has one hell of a soundtrack, matching its moods to an array of classic rock and hip-hop tunes in the Martin Scorsese vein.)
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Rubberneck immediately put me in mind of the classic slow burn of vintage thrillers like Fritz Lang’s “M” and Michael Powell’s “Peeping Tom,” although Karpovsky and co-writer Garth Donovan have cited all kinds of other things, from “Michael Clayton” to “Caché” to “Fatal Attraction.”
    • 57 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    The Equalizer is gripping, mysterious and even sometimes moving, but it’s never pleasant, still less fun. If you decide to go, don’t claim you weren’t warned. If you skip it, you’re missing one of the year’s signal works of superior Hollywood craftsmanship.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    Whatever it is, it's simultaneously on speed and Quaaludes; I don't know if any movie this profoundly insane has been seen in general release since Antonia Bird's Gold Rush cannibal comedy "Ravenous."
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A memorable and outrageous movie, but one more likely to be remembered as a massive folly than a whopping success.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    That whole meta-biographical aspect doesn't bug me much because everybody who's ever written or directed a romantic comedy is drawing on their own emotional experience; this one's just a little more obvious about it.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    I enjoyed every moment of this densely plotted final chapter, and most other fans will too.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A modest but agreeable, and often very funny, movie.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Kostic, a Bosnian actor who has done quite a bit of British film and TV, and the Sarajevo-born beauty Marjanovic make a combustible screen couple, and Jolie knows it. Despite the film's generally somber tone, there's more than a hint of "Night Porter"-style perversity to their relationship, which at different times is platonic, therapeutic and highly erotic.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Deschanel is great, with her feral eyes and Joey Ramone shag haircut, and Ferrell is fantastic. This one's worth the effort to find.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The second movie by "Being John Malkovich" writer Charlie Kaufman is even weirder than his first.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Million Dollar Arm is not just a Disney film, but a Disney film that could have been made, with minor elisions and different character names, in 1963.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew O'Hehir
    His scattershot and ad hominem attacks against many different forms of religious hypocrisy don't add up to a coherent critique, and he's not qualified to provide one.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Beyond that educational element and the delicate performances of Dancy and Byrne, I found Adam dramatically limp, predictable and in a curious way even retrograde.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's an exceptionally well-made example of the kind of delirious, semi-Gothic, overcooked melodrama filmmakers from the Boot have long specialized in.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Reygadas is an undeniably important artist hewing his own path, but who is also self-consciously playing to the tastes of a tiny elite audience that craves obscurantism, confrontation and heavy-handed symbolism. Still, I really want you to see this. Then I'll have somebody to talk about it with.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    A terrific comic-book movie, the most completely satisfying and unsettling one I've ever seen.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Make no mistake, this movie is a mess. But, wow, what a mess! It's an exploding piñata, full of low comedy and high drama, deliriously colorful fight scenes and vehicle chases.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    In addition to possessing the most confusing title of the year, Canadian filmmaker Michael Dowse's high-energy dance-club saga It's All Gone Pete Tong arrives in an elaborate package of spoof and deception that should win the admiration of any practical-joke connoisseur.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Some of the knife-twisting later scenes in "Don't Be Afraid of the Dark" feel almost campy, like winks at the audience or studious self-referentiality. None of this is quite enough to ruin a gripping, gruesome fable, which of course del Toro's fans and other genre buffs will rush out to see, but it does render the movie a minor muddle rather than a horror masterwork.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Sloppy but cheerful documentary.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    A stylish and muscular thriller with some nifty twists and turns, a wicked sense of humor, several terrific performances and not one or even two but three of the best car chases in recent action-flick history.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The Rum Diary is enjoyable enough, after its digressive, episodic and voyeuristic fashion. But neither Depp nor Robinson seems quite aware that Thompson's story - both in terms of his brief career in Puerto Rico and in terms of his life - was at least as much a story of tragedy and self-immolation as it was of genius.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    A movie that opens with a sensational bang and then proceeds to pursue the Big Questions about life and death in lovely, lugubrious and increasingly off-putting fashion, until all its drama has been frittered away in a dreamy, drifty haze.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew O'Hehir
    A movie that's laughable without, alas, even being enjoyably awful.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    In its quest to create "wholesome" entertainment, the movie industry is furiously turning back the clock four decades or so, to the days when men were men, girls were cute but knew their place and pencil-necked Poindexters stayed out of your damn face.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Whatever its flaws, Maleficent is a family-friendly Disney adventure that offers a relaunched and thoroughly delightful Angelina Jolie.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Carell's performance as Barry, is nothing short of magnificent.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Joy
    From a narrative and cinematic point of view, the problem with Joy is simple. Russell is almost totally uninterested in the story of how Joy Mangano explored a bizarre and unknown new business model and became its first self-made tycoon, and as a result we aren’t interested either.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Shifting his focus away from white kids seems to have done Clark good, because Wassup Rockers is the least sensationalistic, and hence the least moralistic, of his films. It's an enjoyable if haphazard picaresque.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    You'll either find The Extra Man utterly charming or thoroughly mystifying, but either way Kevin Kline, playing a community-theater version of himself, with all the foppishness and Shakespearean pretension but half the talent and none of the luck, inhabits its peculiar soul.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Mercifully, as seen from 11 years later, Jayson Blair himself seems a lot less important, not to mention a lot less interesting.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Almodóvar isn’t just flashing back, retro-style, to the era of “Pepi, Luci, Bom” and “What Have I Done to Deserve This?” He’s also returning to a core principle of that era and of his work, which is that human sexuality, as much as it drives us crazy and makes us do stupid things, is also a force for the liberation of the human soul.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 20 Andrew O'Hehir
    I felt like dropping to my knees in the theater and praying for this smug, irritating fake-reality-TV show to go away, leaving these three terrific actors (and characters) in something resembling a real movie.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    Despite looking, feeling and (especially) sounding expensive – this is one of the loudest summer spectacles of recent years – Man of Steel is second-tier and third-generation Chris Nolan-flavored neo-superhero material.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    If Christensen's conventional plot is somewhat at odds with her downbeat realism, the idea that these characters are willing to fight like cats and dogs, and destroy each other and themselves, to avoid confronting their intense attraction to each other is totally convincing.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Yes
    For the most part Yes buzzes with visual life and imagination.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Bastardizes the source material to no good purpose, ending up with a strained combination of rah-rah, boy-bonding adventure and p.c. cross-cultural exploration.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    High-style goofballing and globetrotting can get you pretty far, but maybe not as far as Johnson wants us to go.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    Its too-muchness is also the source of its power; I was absolutely never bored, and felt surprised when the movie ended. It's an amazing, baffling, thrilling and (for many, it would appear) irritating experience, and for my money the most beautiful and distinctive big-screen vision of the year.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    A very mixed bag. Despite some faint gestures in the direction of journalistic balance, it plays a lot like a two-hour infomercial for the Playboy publisher's historical importance, philosophical depth and personal greatness.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Dark Shadows offers potent atmosphere and delirious '70s fashions and hilarious gags and some really terrific performances, none better than Pfeiffer's triumphant return to the screen as a pitch-perfect family matriarch.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a perfectly cheerful time at the movies, without any hint of drama or surprise.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 20 Andrew O'Hehir
    Disposable crap.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    If "Cocaine Cowboys" was an epic, ironic yarn of murder and madness and the building of a boomtown built largely on drug money, Square Groupers is a more rueful tale.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 10 Andrew O'Hehir
    A stodgy, moribund plodder loaded with stock characters that wouldn’t have felt edgy in 1983 and has about the same contemporary urgency as your average late-night rerun of “CSI: NY.”
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    I'm not sure V/H/S is brilliant cinema or anything – indeed, I'm not sure it's appropriate to call it cinema at all – but it sure is an ingenious hybrid: part Godardian art film, part abstract video experiment, part sleazy shocker, and all self-castigating interrogation of what film-theory types call the "male gaze."
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Hellion offers a startling and memorable portrait of adolescent life in downscale East Texas suburbia, along with a white-hot breakthrough performance from teenage actor Josh Wiggins.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    As utterly disastrous movies go, this one's really got something.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    2 Guns is both enjoyable trash and a fascinating snapshot of Hollywood’s current mentality when it comes to the United States government.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    I’m being deliberately mean about a plot device that Curtis wants to come off as a goofy, harmless comic metaphor, but the idea that this implausible inherited trait is actually a cryptic, creepazoid form of domination over women is right there in the movie.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Safe is both a slavish imitation of cinema gone by and a movie for our time. I found it wickedly entertaining and perversely refreshing in its total lack of contemporary piety.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Some fragments of that Dostoevskian romance linger on here: Just enough so that Wyatt and Wahlberg nail the climactic scene, when Jim is literally playing for his life, and make it momentarily seem to mean something. But not quite enough that you’ll remember what that something might be the next day.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It honestly shouldn't work at all, yet somehow on the strength of good humor and sex appeal ends up being one of the most enjoyable mainstream films of the season.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Once you get past the question of why someone would make a movie this artificial in the first place and move on to the answer (purely for the hell of it), Sukiyaki Western Django is a blood-drenched, dynamite, often hilarious and uniquely weird big-screen entertainment.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Offers a mesmerizing, behind-the-music glimpse at a crucial and bizarre moment in rock history, and maybe in American cultural history, period.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The resulting film directed by Scott Hicks is afflicted by terminal nostalgic drift. You come out of the theater with nothing more specific than half-pleasant memories of baseball gloves, Ferris wheels and vintage automobiles. I've had naps that were more exciting.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's the most original picture by an American director I've seen this year, and also the most delightful.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    I admired the humor, the tremendous craftsmanship and even the shock value of Hostel, but found the Grand Guignol torture scenes excessive. (Unless you're a hardcore fan of Italian, Spanish and Japanese gore flicks, you've never seen anything like this.)
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Brandon Cronenberg clearly understands that he has to deal with the legacy of his last name, and Antiviral feels to me like a perverse act of exorcism, half tribute and half cleansing ritual.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Like last year's "American Pie," Road Trip crisply delivers the goods: vaguely rakish heroes, vaguely kinky sex and highly naked nubiles.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    Whether or not Luhrmann’s “Gatsby” will go down in history as a legendary flop is not for me to judge (though all signs currently point toward yes), but it surely belongs to the category of baroque, overblown, megalomaniacal spectacles dubbed “film follies” by longtime Nation film critic Stuart Klawans.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's blissfully, pants-wettingly funny from beginning to end.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    Maybe that pictorial pleasantness will distract summer moviegoers from the fact that shot-to-shot transitions are often awkward, dialogue scenes are forced and poorly staged and that even by rom-com standards the obstacles created to keep Sophie and Stanley apart until a respectable running time has elapsed are idiotic.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    This movie feels a little half-baked to me in the sense that it carries an exceedingly complicated intellectual agenda below the surface of a conventional thriller, and doesn’t execute either level as well as it might.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is Gondry at his most liberated and inventive. You simply can’t grab hold of Mood Indigo in its early scenes, and you’re better off surrendering to its crackpot energy and enjoying the ride.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It’s a highly capable sequel that drinks long and deep from the established Marvel legendarium and brings back all the key players from Kenneth Branagh’s 2011 hit “Thor.”
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    So to call this a good movie is really a stretch; it's more like 38 percent of a good movie. But it probably has just enough dumb fun and pointless violence and car chases to seem like a highly viable option for large numbers of people this weekend.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The singer Pink, also known as Alecia Moore, here plays Dede, one of the group’s only female members, and the connection between Dede and Neil, which at first stretches credibility to the breaking point, may be the best thing about “Thanks for Sharing.”
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    When it comes to any larger questions about what was lost or gained, and whether Frankie Valli’s odyssey was worth it, Eastwood throws up his hands. Who knows? He’s made a thoroughly tolerable and non-insulting summer movie for grown-ups; isn’t that enough?
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Ror me its heartbreaking denouement – with shades of a Raymond Carver or William Kennedy ending – packed a prodigious emotional wallop.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew O'Hehir
    Pontypool is something like a claustrophobic, locked-in-the-barn zombie movie, only almost without zombies.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Puccini for Beginners may divide individual audience members. It divided me; rarely have I seen a film simultaneously so good and so bad.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Schroeder isn’t much of a comic-strip expert or historian, by his own admission, so Dear Mr. Watterson bounces off many of the most interesting issues in and around “Calvin and Hobbes,” noticing them but not exploring them deeply.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Whole New Thing comes unglued toward the end, spiraling into melodrama without ever escaping its whiny, indie-rock soundtrack.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    If this willfully peculiar and daring Cymbeline isn’t to all tastes, it brings back the blood, the thrills and the sense of moral discovery to a long-neglected work.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A luminous picture, beautifully made, loaded with symbolism and mystical-religious imagery, about an artist's self-destructive quest for an unreachable grail. It's also a deliberately prurient spectacle designed to be arousing and troubling -- most viewers, I imagine, will have both reactions at various times (and maybe at the same time).
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Maggie Thatcher contains multitudes; she is rife with contradictions you can barely glimpse in this modestly affecting movie.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Oblivion is a technical triumph rather than a philosophical breakthrough, demonstrating how beautifully digital effects can be blended with real people and real sets, demonstrating that neither Tom Cruise nor the 1970s will ever die, and announcing the unexpected arrival of a major science-fiction director.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    As crafty and compelling as Aaron Aites and Audrey Ewell's Until the Light Takes Us is, it may go too far in its understandable desire to correct the bias and prejudice of mainstream journalism.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    This isn't a boring movie or a dishonest one. But it's a relentlessly literal-minded one, light on vision and atmosphere, that moves through the history of the Germs with a checklist.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    In its own strange way, the tiny, mysterious and occasionally terrifying indie film Felt captures the confusion of this moment in gender relations, and especially the confusion around the term “rape culture.”
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A dark, sweet and sophisticated confection.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Paranormal Activity 2 suffers from the excessive expository blah-blah that's so common in horror-movie sequels.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Let’s give Allen full credit, by the way, for casting Posey as this wounded, sexy and emotionally rich middle-aged woman, a character enormously more interesting than Jill.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Despite its abundant flaws and historical howlers and generally dimwitted tone, Robin Hood is a surprisingly enjoyable work of popcorn cinema, if you're willing to take it on its own terms.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Not many documentaries about poverty in the developing world are so hopeful; you can't help wondering what Brabbée's camera will find among the Bachara in another decade.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Much of Devil's Rejects is absolutely hilarious, especially the brief appearance by a Gene Shalit-like film critic who explicates all the Groucho Marx references. Zombie's eye for the faux-'70s detail is perfect.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The 76-year-old Zeffirelli will make many more movies, but Tea With Mussolini has the unmistakable feeling of a personal testament. Its sunny disposition and modest wit are well-suited to the genial temper of this born entertainer.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Honestly, one can only wish that Hollywood made movies for non-teenagers and non-comics fans with this much care and reverence. Are superhero movies dying? Well sure, but you and I and the planet may die first.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 20 Andrew O'Hehir
    I've never seen anything crazier than Palindromes. You can read that as praise if you're that sort of person, but I don't mean it that way.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Après Vous offers nice sound design and an unfussy presentation of middle-class Paris. It comes and goes with no unpleasant aftertaste.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's difficult to make this mediocre adaptation of perhaps the best-loved book in C.S. Lewis' Narnia series -- seem particularly interesting.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is spectacle cinema made with individual flair; maybe someone in Hollywood will notice that it's still possible.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    An entertaining diversion, mostly because Rossellini and Hurt are a pair of seasoned and graceful pros who know how to work every line and every gesture, and it's great to see them playing characters who are exactly their age.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    There's no story beyond the utterly formulaic and not the slightest semblance of realism, but your kids will enjoy it if they're young enough and pretty easy to please.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is one of those movies destined to be watched by family groups who can't agree on what to see: You'll all get a few chuckles, and then it's home for dessert.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Winterbottom's adaptation of the novel is spellbinding cinema, with all the atmosphere, technical excellence and expert pacing the British director is known for.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    I'm going to suggest, somewhat tentatively, that Bachelorette is most unlike "Bridesmaids" because it fundamentally isn't a comedy at all, but something closer to a dense, dark character drama tarted up in high heels and a short skirt and dosed with pills and coke.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It’s entirely ludicrous but highly enjoyable.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Is this an "indie" film with a deliberately messed-up chronology and an ambitious narrative you'll appreciate even more the second time through? Yes. Is this a deliberately trashy horror-comedy with a few decent jolts and several big laughs, best viewed with a gang of friends and a consciousness-altering agent of your choosing, parasitical or not? That too.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    So, yeah - even if In Time descends from its gripping and thought-provoking premise into a mediocre chase thriller before it's over, it's still pretty damn satisfying to watch in the current climate.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew O'Hehir
    A pallid, mediocre tale that treacles its way through well-worn channels.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Brian De Palma's Redacted doesn't quite work as a movie. But it works as SOMETHING.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This piece of midsummer madness is undeniably silly and delusional, a dire political fable told as tongue-in-cheek pastiche.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's an intensely crafted and genuinely memorable horror film from a striking new talent.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    LUV
    Both for good and for ill, LUV has a film-school feeling about it, and channels a legacy of fatalistic American crime cinema that includes "Mean Streets" and "Treasure of the Sierra Madre."
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Wild Side is sometimes maddening to watch, but will haunt you for days afterward.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Taken on its own terms, it's a light, sweet, curiously enjoyable misfit romance, whose real star is not Aniston but her magnificently awkward Lothario, Jason Bateman.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Citizen Koch is kind of a mess. But it’s a mess well worth discovering for yourself.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    If anything, Boulevard is the apotheosis of Williams’ later career, not an anomaly. I wish I could tell you it was a better and more satisfying film, but even its odd, strangled and almost antique quality – it plays out like a well-intentioned Sundance drama from about 1986 – feels curiously appropriate.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a tight, taut, expertly crafted thriller from a director to watch.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A ponderous but mesmerizing tick-tock thriller.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    [Rec] 2 is a pell-mell, edge-of-your-seat, theme-park ride through hell, and I strongly advise you to ignore the aspersions cast upon it by snooty critics and random Internet fanboys alike. I am your friend, horror fans! I know what you need, and this is it.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    The thing is, it works. Or at least it works for me. I left the theater convinced that House of Fools is Konchalovsky's best work in almost 20 years (which it is) and that it might be something close to a masterpiece.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    People will either love Detachment or hate it, and either way it provides powerful testimony to the unrivaled passion and undiminished craft of director Kaye, whose notoriety in the film industry is matched by his near-total invisibility to the general public.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The pleasant surprise when you actually watch Insidious is that it turns out to be a moderately effective suburban-family creep show, majorly in debt to "Poltergeist" and "The Exorcist" and capturing at least a little of their spirit.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    An achingly sweet, shambling creation that takes its time and wanders through slow-moving sight gags and odd supporting performances (like Mia Farrow's, as a dithery, lonely woman who is among the store's only customers) and ends up with a marvelously warm community-melding scene out of maybe 1924, with a bunch of people standing around on the street watching a black-and-white silent film.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Considered as a whole it's a wonderful and hilarious phenomenon, most of it is executed to Dadaist perfection.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    The whole thing is handsomely mounted, with plenty of Goya paintings and supposed observations about the ironies of history and the cyclical nature of life, etc. Forman's always been a huckster, but I never thought I'd see him waste this many good actors on a movie this bad.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's almost really cool, without quite being really cool.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    For deeply steeped Marvel Comics aficionados it will probably be fairly satisfying, and there’s no reason on earth why anyone else should even bother.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A canny, ingeniously crafted guilty pleasure.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    The movie never fails to be crisply written and cannily delivered, but it's way too steeped in TV-culture inside jokes for its own good, and August's attempts to suffuse the whole thing with ontological or theological meaning are ultimately pretty dumb.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A compelling and unpretentious indie built around two wonderfully layered performances and straightforward storytelling. Give it a listen.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    My Blueberry Nights may not quite be what fans of either Jones or Wong Kar-wai -- directing his first film in English -- are expecting. It's a late-night, lovelorn mood piece in a minor key, not complicated or convoluted, finally more confection than substance.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    What we’re left with is a teen-oriented action flick with an A-minus cast, a mixture of “Transformers”-style robot battles and cops-and-robbers showdown that never feels all that exciting or cutting-edge, bracketed by some intriguing and half-successful moments of social commentary.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The charm and the shoddiness of Haiku Tunnel stem from the same source. It's basically a San Francisco underground theater production that somehow escaped onto the movie screen without losing any of its eccentric, insular qualities.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    If you want a movie that eviscerates “The Hunger” and eats its bloody insides while daring you to look away, here it is.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's exactly the sort of movie that Hollywood specializes in, the kind which seems on paper as if it ought to be entertaining, but winds up a massive and chaotic drag.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    An oddly listless and downbeat affair, setting these two beloved eccentrics adrift in a road movie that's rarely funny enough to connect as absurdist comedy and rarely compelling enough to work as recession-era male-bonding melodrama.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    If you're willing to suspend not just disbelief but also all considerations of logic and intelligence and narrative coherence, it's also a rip-roaring, fun adventure, fatefully balanced between high camp and boyish seriousness at almost every second.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Even with its abundant flaws and its willingness to embarrass itself this strange and extraordinary film never lost me and never let me go; it wrapped me in a dreamlike rapture and then in a sense of profound and nearly universal personal tragedy.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's one of the year's signature film experiences.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    If anything, Think Like a Man, the awkward but intermittently amusing black-centric ensemble film built out of comedian Steve Harvey's self-help bestseller "Act Like a Lady, Think Like a Man" deserves a gold star for its generous portrayals of Caucasians.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Gitai's experimental technique in Free Zone is dizzying, sometimes thrilling.

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