Andrew O'Hehir

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For 1,456 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Andrew O'Hehir's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 A Separation
Lowest review score: 0 The Human Centipede II (Full Sequence)
Score distribution:
1456 movie reviews
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Is this an "indie" film with a deliberately messed-up chronology and an ambitious narrative you'll appreciate even more the second time through? Yes. Is this a deliberately trashy horror-comedy with a few decent jolts and several big laughs, best viewed with a gang of friends and a consciousness-altering agent of your choosing, parasitical or not? That too.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Oblivion is a technical triumph rather than a philosophical breakthrough, demonstrating how beautifully digital effects can be blended with real people and real sets, demonstrating that neither Tom Cruise nor the 1970s will ever die, and announcing the unexpected arrival of a major science-fiction director.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Talky but fascinating period drama.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is one of those moving, tragic and triumphant secret histories of American culture where the biggest surprise is that no one’s told it before.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Taken on its own terms The Wolverine is the cleanest, least pretentious and most satisfying superhero movie of the summer.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It’s a crisp and often hilarious female-centric social satire loaded with delicious talent from the TV-comedy pool.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    On first viewing, I conclude that Enough Said is irresistible, and demands a second (and third) viewing right away.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    There’s a hint of Terrence Malick (or David Lowery, of “Ain’t Them Bodies Saints”) in the often-gorgeous photography of Ryan Samul, and a hint of Shakespearean grandeur in Sage’s portrayal of a dignified and honorable American father infused with an ideology of madness. I’m pretty sure I’ve never seen an exploitation film played so effectively as human tragedy.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    One of the strangest and least summarizable motion pictures ever made: tragic and hilarious, tightly constructed and miscellaneous.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    The influence of early Alfred Hitchcock is all over this movie, translated in unusual and original fashion.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It’s a work of chilly wit and bleak metaphor, an artifice that invites the kind of analytical response where we pull on our chins and discuss how other people, more naive than we, will receive it.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    As Margaret Brown’s quietly devastating documentary The Great Invisible makes clear, the oil companies and the resource-guzzling, planet-poisoning economy they drive are too big to fail, and our entire consumerist culture of ever-cheaper goods and 24/7 convenience is bigger still.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    I enjoyed this movie more thoroughly, and more liberated from frustration and ambivalence, than anything Godard has made in at least 20 years. It provided me with an interpretive frame that may even lead me back to another crack at “Notre Musique” (2004) and “For Ever Mozart” (1996) and most of all the extraordinary 1988-1998 video documentary series “Histoire(s) du cinéma.”
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    '71
    It’s a riveting, man-on-the-run genre movie, almost a combination of “Black Hawk Down” and “After Hours,” rather than an allegory or a historical treatise.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Love it, hate it or tolerate it with reluctance, Buzzard has a ruthless clarity of vision, and breaks new ground in pushing character-based comedy right to the edge of profound discomfort.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    There’s an honesty and ferocity to Heaven Knows What, a refusal to flinch from depicting the marginalized and despised underbelly of a caste-divided city.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    It’s entirely ludicrous but highly enjoyable.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Riveting jigsaw-puzzle documentary.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    My personal view is that Quentin Tarantino is now permanently high on his own supply, but you could just as well say that he has succeeded in reinventing the art film. Is it worth it to put yourself through the brutal and incoherent three-hour ordeal of The Hateful Eight for its moments of brilliance and its ultimate catharsis? Jesus, don’t look at me.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A canny, ingeniously crafted guilty pleasure.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Although Instinct is strictly a Hollywood formula picture, it's such an efficiently executed one, built around two such outstanding actors, that for the most part you won't mind.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A movie where style and craft are fatally confused with substance, and where almost no effort is made to make the characters seem like believable people.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    As is typical with Egoyan, the structure is complicated and the layers of cinematic technique and texture are even more so.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A subtle and often surprising study of the relationship between damaged adult siblings, full of mordant humor and dramatic invention.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The charm and the shoddiness of Haiku Tunnel stem from the same source. It's basically a San Francisco underground theater production that somehow escaped onto the movie screen without losing any of its eccentric, insular qualities.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    I was laughing myself sick over Saving Silverman, a sublimely idiotic farce in the "There's Something About Mary" tradition.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    There's plenty to like here, especially for connoisseurs of the action genre, and there's also plenty to make you wonder whether Besson and co-writer Robert Mark Kamen scribbled their screenplay on a batch of Marseilles cocktail napkins and then lost one or two.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    What makes me respect The Man Who Wasn't There despite myself is the sense that the Coens want it to be about something that can't be described or defined.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's thrilling to see something this profane, mythic and, most of all, not bored with life, love and the possibilities of cinema.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Spike Lee's explosive, near-masterpiece media satire balances between brilliance and incoherence.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A haunting and terrifying film. It's also a film of wonderful spaces and silences.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A deviously engineered parasite that'll crawl under your skin and live in your nervous system for a while if you give it half a chance.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    No serious film fan could stomach the cheap gags and farting contests in this goofball tribute. I laughed myself stupid anyway.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Outsiders will find this schtick-laden, mildly exciting adventure yarn an inoffensive triviality, while fans will savor one more encounter with Picard, Riker, Data, Worf and the gang, replete with all the well-worn character tics and platitudinous parables about the contemporary world they expect.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's undoubtedly a canny and clever twist on the standard zombie-attack yarn, but anybody who's making grand claims for 28 Days Later simply hasn't seen enough horror movies.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    May frustrate as many viewers as it delights (if not more) and it is almost relentlessly depressing, but it's also a principled, sharply realistic film that captures a highly convincing vision of Middle America.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It may bore you to death or blow your mind -- and it's long and convoluted enough to do both -- but it holds nothing back.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Pedestrian but appealing.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Noé isn't a kid (he'll turn 40 this year) but he's still young as a filmmaker; he may yet learn to control his desire to sear the audience's eyes out with a red-hot poker before he's even started telling a story.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Uprooted from their home soil, González Iñárritu and screenwriter Guillermo Arriaga can't quite manage to make this gloomy, improbable stew of romance, film noir and pseudo-metaphysical speculation hang together.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Veers unpredictably between wrenching psychodrama and "Spinal Tap"-style mockumentary.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Something of a gigantic goof, perpetrated by Penn and Herzog -- and the goofees included much of the entertainment media, people in the film business, the Scottish authorities and (I think) even some of the film's cast.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Not among the most memorable works in this genre, but its deliberate lack of artifice and its stitched-together quality possess an undeniable power.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a charming, low-key entry in the burgeoning tradition of travelog indies -- by which I mean feature films that take you to some godforsaken outback you're unlikely to visit personally.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a classic gal-pal movie, perfect for daughters, sisters, moms and the guys whose asses they kick.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Despite his reliance on visual cliché, Trajkov mines a rich vein of morbid Slavic comedy, and his young characters have an appetite for adventure that's thoroughly unfake.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Has a lot of integrity, both in visual and conceptual terms, and seamlessly blends entertainment and education.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Despite all that South American sunshine, this lean and brilliantly constructed thriller is a dark realm of secrets and lies, illuminated by TV lighting and the glitter of John Leguizamo's eyes. Those in search of life-affirming family entertainment might want to stick with Ingmar Bergman.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A scared-straight after-school special, but actually good.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    An engaging, well-made docu that admirably captures the singular importance of its subject.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    But if the storytelling is murky, the filmmaking is stunning and, more important, the passion for this city -- its people and landscape -- is pure.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The film's strange blend of tragedy and surreal gore, à la Dario Argento and Lucio Fulci, is surprisingly effective. For the right person, and you know who you are, this one's a must-see.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The problem with Seitzman's script is how predictable almost all of it feels.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A charming comedy with a philosophical undercurrent that provides a fascinating glimpse of Jerusalem's ultra-Orthodox Jews, who live in a realm almost literally sealed off from outsiders. But the most remarkable thing about the film is that it exists at all.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    As sad stories go, this is a happy one.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Paradise Now isn't a comfortable viewing experience, but it isn't meant to be. Inevitably, people's reactions to this subject matter -- and this filmmaker's handling of it -- are all over the map. All I can say is that I found it a tremendously compelling existential thriller that kept me up late the night I saw it, and it has resonated in my brain ever since.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a strange and murky movie, at times a frustrating one, but I also found it profoundly moving in a way no regular thriller ever is.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The story of how La Sierra moves from a seemingly pointless war to an unexpected peace is a thrilling one, although the impact of seeing what becomes of these three kids is devastating.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Sloppy but cheerful documentary.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A delightfully off-kilter love story. I don't want to oversell this winsome little movie, but if you want a bittersweet but cheerful pick-me-up on a cold winter evening, it's just the ticket.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    To state the obvious, Manderlay is often patently offensive in its racial politics, and it surely isn't for everyone. It is, however, very funny, very dark and very skillfully played.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Deschanel is great, with her feral eyes and Joey Ramone shag haircut, and Ferrell is fantastic. This one's worth the effort to find.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    What makes Boynton's film stand out amid the current crop of political documentaries is its rigorous reportorial fairness, and its refusal to simplify material in order to score facile ideological points.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Duck Season is something quite different, capable of gratifying film snobs and regular viewers alike.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A modest but agreeable, and often very funny, movie.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Gitai's experimental technique in Free Zone is dizzying, sometimes thrilling.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It will change your understanding of the Vietnam era, even if you were alive then.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Shifting his focus away from white kids seems to have done Clark good, because Wassup Rockers is the least sensationalistic, and hence the least moralistic, of his films. It's an enjoyable if haphazard picaresque.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    As long as Klapisch keeps his characters pinballing each other from one Euro-capital to the next, Russian Dolls remains fun and charming, without ever seeming remotely serious or meaningful.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    While Keating's agenda is clearly hostile, and Giuliani's political committee is eagerly trying to do counter-propaganda, this isn't a campaign of character assassination or innuendo, but rather a dutifully constructed biographical film about a tremendously skilled prosecutor and politician.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    While it would be accurate to call the film a comedy, the Duplasses are trying to wrestle something closer to Chekhov than to farce out of the lives of these semi-likable, highly recognizable people.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Autumn is actually pretty damn good. It's a defiantly odd work, a movie-movie set more in the crime-film Paris of Jean-Pierre Melville or Jacques Becker or early Godard than in the real 21st century city.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a small film, but it moved me and made me angry. Both reactions, in this context, are worthwhile.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Despite the lurid content, this is a beautifully made film that reaches for moral seriousness and resists facile judgments.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a sensitive, slow-moving 19th century samurai drama that will appeal to that tiny cadre of filmgoers who savor the classic Japanese films of Mizoguchi and Inagaki.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    By the end of Who Killed the Electric Car? you'll be worked into a lather one way or another. Paine crams in more theories, ideas and arguments than the movie can easily hold, but that's OK with me.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Much of the picture is exciting and terrifying.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Been Rich All My Life is something like the "Ballets Russes" of tap dancing. I'm delighted to report that the similarities include the fact that the Belles are transmitting their improvisatory "rhythm tap" style to generations of younger dancers.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Candela Peña is sensational in the leading role, and the film is big-hearted, poetic, sweet, sad and romantic.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The simplicity and profundity of that faith, and the unquestionable nobility of Judge's death, are well captured here.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Juliette Lewis makes Aurora Borealis into a funnier, richer, more powerful film than it has any reason to be.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    I hate to criticize anybody for artistic ambition, but the problem with Babel isn't that it's a bad movie. It's a good movie, or, more accurately, it's several pieces of good movie, chopped up in service of a pretentious, portentous and slightly silly artistic vision.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Contrary to what you may read elsewhere, Climates is not a masterpiece, a word that gets pompously thrown around a lot at pictures few paying customers actually want to see. It is, rather, a meticulous study of a crumbling relationship, marked by many luminous small moments and a startling interruption of violent eroticism.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    I still have unanswered moral questions about the film -- unanswered because unanswerable, I suspect -- but it's a beautiful, wrenching, horrifying work of cinema, unlike anything I have ever seen or will see again.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    With its intelligence, compassion, human terror and sheer loveliness, Candy is a winner despite the well-worn path it treads.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Not many documentaries about poverty in the developing world are so hopeful; you can't help wondering what Brabbée's camera will find among the Bachara in another decade.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Home of the Brave isn't exactly a subtle or a delicate picture -- it's an old-fashioned Hollywood movie, at least in tone, that's being released like an indie -- but it has some terrific acting and comes straight from the heart.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A memorable and outrageous movie, but one more likely to be remembered as a massive folly than a whopping success.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The universe of The Dead Girl is an almost uniformly dreary one, whose women are all either dowdy or whorish.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Abduction sheds light onto one of the strangest episodes in recent Asian history, but the murk that hangs over North Korea is still too deep for much light to penetrate.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is an important film. It's amazing that it exists, and the events it recounts are still more amazing. Everybody should see it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Avenue Montaigne, is a delicious French pastry, tart and sweet, steeped in Parisian glamour.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    I won't argue for the cinematic virtues of this film; they don't exist. But as a pseudo-documentary portrait of real life behind the explosive headlines, it's absorbing.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    An irresistible fable of reconciliation and forgiveness.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A luminous picture, beautifully made, loaded with symbolism and mystical-religious imagery, about an artist's self-destructive quest for an unreachable grail. It's also a deliberately prurient spectacle designed to be arousing and troubling -- most viewers, I imagine, will have both reactions at various times (and maybe at the same time).
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a messy, colorful big-screen entertainment that veers from sober period piece to outrageous melodrama, which is to say it's a Verhoeven movie.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Year of the Dog is an enjoyable, patchy, rambling affair, a series of bittersweet comic sketches strung together with thin wire.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    I wish one-tenth of the films I saw were made with this much craft and integrity, this much intuitive understanding of where to put the camera, how much of the story to explain in words (not much) and how much to trust his outstanding cast to carry the film with their voices, faces and bodies.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Zoo
    Quiet, sensitive, resolutely unsensational documentary about virtually the most sensational subject you can imagine.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a lovely, measured and deeply earnest work. It balances a realistic view of first century Palestine against a sincere consideration of how an ordinary man might learn he is divine.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Formally, Klores film is a standard-issue documentary, combining period footage with talking-head interviews. But his talking heads are a hoot -- leathery, leisure-suited, foul-mouthed, larger-than-life characters, straight out of the Bronx by way of Palm Beach -- and their story is a Gothic yarn of obsession, crime and forgiveness.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    If Thalbach's fiery performance is the heart of Strike, her costar is the vast and impressive Gdansk shipyard itself.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    On one level, this is an altogether obvious lesson about market capitalism.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Jolly good fun.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    If a film can be both lush and cold, both erotic and cautious, that film is Lady Chatterley. It's a picture to honor and appreciate, not necessarily to love.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A moving and profoundly upsetting portrait of life near the bottom of the global power pyramid.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Gerardo Naranjo's deliriously trashy Drama/Mex may not do much to burnish the international prestige of Mexican cinema, but it's an entertaining blend of obvious influences, from softcore cable-TV porn to Tarantino to "Less Than Zero" and "Leaving Las Vegas."
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Terrifically acted, reassuringly formulaic, and moderately amusing.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Delpy's writing is sharply observed and often hilarious, and her own performance as the perennially enraged Marion -- whom she says was inspired by Robert De Niro's Jake LaMotta in "Raging Bull" -- is one of her most memorable.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Utterly delightful.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    There's a vivid comedy to this family's emotional state of siege, an easy confidence to Honoré's camerawork, and plenty of beautiful bodies.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Primo Levi's Journey is a profound meditation on the unevenness of history, reminding us -- as Faulkner once remarked -- that the past not only isn't dead, it isn't really past at all.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    An oddly graceful combination of fairy tale and romantic comedy, set in a forgotten corner of the world.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Hu, a Chinese-American immigrant who made a mid-career switch from business to filmmaking, approaches these characters with genuine passion and compassion, and her evident talent shines through the timeworn material. Acting by all three principals is tremendous.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Simply too bright and pleasant to become a huge hit, but it's a confident little genre film with near-classic charm.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lynn Hershman hasn't reached much of an audience, which makes the modest national rollout of her fascinating Strange Culture a noteworthy event.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    I'm still not quite sure why it's so compelling. I think this movie's appeal is overdetermined, as we used to say in sophomore Marxist-theory class, meaning that it derives from so many sources you can't keep track of them all.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Sleuth is well acted, and directed by Branagh with chilly, distant ingenuity. It has a certain edge and daring, or more to the point it pretends to.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    An intriguing blend of mainstream audience-pleaser and a more subtle, even intellectual agenda.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Charles Nelson Reilly is still alive, dammit, and boy does he have a story to tell.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    If it arrives in final form as (still) a total mess, it's such a passionate and ambitious mess -- overcrowded with extraordinary images, incomprehensible ideas, literary and pop-cultural references and colliding subplots -- that it transcends its adolescent awkwardness and approaches being magnificent.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    While excellent in many technical respects, is a muted, pretty, anesthetic concoction that's never fully satisfying.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The Orphanage is a careful, elegant work that looks a little rough around the edges; it was shot largely with natural light and employs minimal special effects.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Dry, wry, difficult-to-capture comedy.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    An achingly sweet, shambling creation that takes its time and wanders through slow-moving sight gags and odd supporting performances (like Mia Farrow's, as a dithery, lonely woman who is among the store's only customers) and ends up with a marvelously warm community-melding scene out of maybe 1924, with a bunch of people standing around on the street watching a black-and-white silent film.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Largely improvised, cast with ex-Marines and Iraqi refugees and shot in Jordan. It might just be the movie this war has been waiting for.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Director Michel Hazanavicius captures the jet-age atmosphere, form-fitting wardrobes, jazz-ethnic soundtrack and bouffant hairdos of JFK/de Gaulle-era espionage films in perfect detail, but it's Dujardin's performance as the suave, confident and utterly clueless Hubert Bonisseur de la Bath (to Francophones, a name that drips with phony aristocratic pretension) that gives "OSS 117" its edge.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's enough to make you forgive a great deal of this film's dumbness and appreciate it as meaningless, goodhearted and mostly non-obnoxious entertainment.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    These people can behave well or poorly, but they were already bugs on the windshield of life before their unhappy collision.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Investigative journalist Donal MacIntyre's film is fairly standard British TV product, closer to a glorified "60 Minutes" segment then to cinematic art. But never mind -- its subject is, as he might say, feckin' amazing.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Beneath its movie star clowning, its awful-but-relatable heroine and its lightweight gags, Burn After Reading poses an implicit challenge to its viewers: Can you figure out why this comedy isn't very funny? Could that be because its central proposition is that the people in the theater are just as stupid, just as gullible, just as eager to be deceived as the people on the screen?
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    May not be entirely original or entirely successful, but it's definitely fun to watch.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A dark, sweet and sophisticated confection.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Nights and Weekends knocked me out when I saw it last March at the South by Southwest festival in Austin, Texas; I wrote at the time that it offered exactly the "prickly, flawed, urgent SXSW experience I'd been waiting for."
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Thrumming with anguish and erotic vitality, Eden paints a heartbreaking portrait of a newly affluent country (freed from dour priests, whiskey-soaked revolutionaries and shawl-clad women) afflicted with emotional growing pains.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's highly enjoyable even if (like me) you're not much of a Potterphile.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Che
    I was never bored, in four hours-plus. Whether or not it ends up becoming a great film (or films), this is miles and miles beyond anything I thought Soderbergh could create from this material.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's amazingly beautiful and it tests your patience; both things are par for the course with Reygadas, After that, you've either surrendered to his idiosyncratic sense of rhythm, or you're out of there.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    By conducting her conversations in public spaces, and removing her interlocutors from desks and offices and book-lined studies and other appurtenances of intellectual authority, Taylor introduces a degree of playfulness and unpredictability that becomes the movie's M.O.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lymelife offers charm and humor through its young central characters and pathos through its remarkable supporting cast, without pulling punches on its overall atmosphere of autumnal darkness and anomie.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Told in lean, tense cinematic gestures, Jerichow also captures a social portrait of newly multicultural Germany, at least as it extends into the country's forgotten rural interior.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A surprisingly refreshing experience, especially in a season of infernal cinematic busyness.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Mackenzie delivers that story as a blend of sex comedy, dark satire, and morality tale that recalls various aspects of "Shampoo" and "Less Than Zero" and "The Graduate," but has a couple of nifty surprises and a poisonous sting in its tail that's all its own.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is no art film, but Edel and Eichinger supply an action-packed, reasonably coherent account of youthful rock 'n' roll idealism run amok, and how it produced the craziest phenomenon of the crazy European far left.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Captures the awful intimacy and the grimy, second-rate quality of the Northern Ireland conflict in resonant fashion.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Pretty damned irresistible. What begins as a winning workout in a highly familiar genre -- the white-ethnic, big-city family comedy -- gradually gains both screwball momentum and emotional power, and delivers an unexpected punch by the time it reaches its climactic pileup of characters and revelations.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    At its best the film is blissfully, anarchically funny, and director Steve Pink keeps the pace crackling.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Sarin and Sonam also lift the veil on potentially explosive divisions within the Tibetan exile community, which is torn between spiritual and cultural loyalty to the Dalai Lama and a widespread longing for true independence. (The filmmakers clearly belong to the pro-independence camp.)
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A quiet, unglamorous film that sneaks up on you slowly. I found it had a lovely, peculiar emotional resonance by the time it was over, but it's likely to appeal more to documentary buffs and obsessive Gondry fans than ordinary moviegoers.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Offers a mesmerizing, behind-the-music glimpse at a crucial and bizarre moment in rock history, and maybe in American cultural history, period.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Despite its abundant flaws and historical howlers and generally dimwitted tone, Robin Hood is a surprisingly enjoyable work of popcorn cinema, if you're willing to take it on its own terms.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    One of the better multiplex options of this legendarily dismal summer.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    There's way too much plot here getting in the way of the story, which makes it tough for Alfredson and cinematographer Peter Mokrosinski to focus on the series' strongest elements. Of course it's the character of Lisbeth that has made these books and movies into a worldwide phenomenon.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a mixed bag with plenty of gags that fall flat, not a comic masterpiece. But it's got tremendous zing, a sense of mischief and a big heart, more than enough to mark it as a delicious shot of caffeinated ice cream, and the summer season's funniest comedy.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Even as this film unravels into incoherent, self-justifying moral instruction, it never becomes boring to watch.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Highly entertaining, from minute to minute, and its semi-mythical portrayal of Torontonian life is entirely charming. If you can stand massive doses of cute and clever, it's a fine use for your summer-movie dollar (whether or not that dollar has a funny old lady on it).
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    RED
    All those guys are a blast, and the dark-hearted idiocy of Red is mostly quite enjoyable.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    When it's all over and you don't have to spend any more time smoking pot with Karl and Bill in their horrid little house, you may feel the elation of tragic catharsis. Then again, you may feel as if you just drank a bottle of drain opener; the difference between those states is subtle.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The seventh and last volume in J.K. Rowling's series of best-selling fantasy novels has been split in half for Hollywood purposes, making this long, dour, impressive and handsome motion picture the penultimate chapter, largely designed to build up the heavy-duty suspense before the climax is delivered next year.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a brash, lightweight backstage comedy that looks lovely, doesn't insult its audience and uses its stars, both young and old, to terrific effect.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A ponderous but mesmerizing tick-tock thriller.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It honestly shouldn't work at all, yet somehow on the strength of good humor and sex appeal ends up being one of the most enjoyable mainstream films of the season.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    In essence, the movie is an ungainly but irresistible romantic-triangle comedy built around Rudd, Reese Witherspoon and Owen Wilson, with Nicholson rambling around its periphery like a demonic bear, part comic relief and part distraction.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Nearly as enjoyable as the original. Its not-so-secret weapon is the poised, calm performance of Yen, who somehow manages to play Ip as both character and archetype.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Often hilarious, although I found it so amped-up and overly broad that I was exhausted before the movie was over.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Hanna is almost a terrific movie, or a partly terrific one, but all its giddy, improvised wonder resolves into nothing more than a ruthless, symmetrical story about a murderous monster.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Fast Five is a fantasy that in no way resembles real life; ordinary morality doesn't apply, and the audience knows that as well as the filmmakers do.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Branagh's completely at home in this kind of inflated family drama, of course, and the three guys yell, sulk and brood in their ridiculous costumes to fine effect.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Marshall delivers old-fashioned swashbuckling action-movie thrills more than computer-engineered grotesquerie.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    At its best when it feels specific to its setting; Erik Wilson's often lovely cinematography captures the distinctive, watery light and raw weather of the Welsh seacoast in winter, and Hawkins, as always, captures a character who is completely specific in terms of class, place and period.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    There's no story beyond the utterly formulaic and not the slightest semblance of realism, but your kids will enjoy it if they're young enough and pretty easy to please.

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