Andrew O'Hehir
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For 1,346 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Andrew O'Hehir's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 69
Highest review score: 100 Thirst
Lowest review score: 0 The Human Centipede II (Full Sequence)
Score distribution:
1,346 movie reviews
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Stop Making Sense is so beautifully choreographed that in some ways it's more like theater than a rock show. [Review of re-release]
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Ida
    What makes Ida remarkable is how much Pawlikowski is able to accomplish in just 80 minutes, with a pair of mismatched female characters, a handful of wintry and desolate locations, the square-format cinematography of Ryszard Lenczewski and Lukasz Zal, and a soundtrack that combines modernism, Soviet-bloc pop music and a haunting performance of John Coltrane’s “Naima” that seems to capture all the emotional possibilities the characters cannot express.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    In the long and fraught history of Franco-American cultural relations, this movie is more than a peace offering; it's a loving, goofy, joyous French kiss.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Offers an exquisite tour of the twilight zone between high school and the so-called real world, as well as between bohemian subculture and the even stranger culture of America at large.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    What makes Tulpan remarkable are the extended unbroken scenes, both dramatic and comic.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    The first Holocaust movie that's actually about another Holocaust movie, and in some peculiar way it brings us closer to the terror and tragedy of the original event.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    It’s perhaps the first great love story of the 21st century that could belong only to this century.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Polley captures the brisk, cheerful fascism of nursing-home existence with merciless clarity; if you've visited a parent or grandparent in one of those places, you may want to laugh and cry in the same moment.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a fine example of British commercial filmmaking at its highest level of craftsmanship.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    It might well be the most important film you see this year, and the most important documentary of this young century.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Citizenfour is both an urgent tale torn from recent headlines and a compelling work of cinema, with all the paranoid density and abrupt changes of scenery of a John le Carré novel.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a warm, richly funny and highly enjoyable human story that takes an intriguing sideways glance at a crucial period in 20th-century history.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is one of Anderson’s funniest and most fanciful movies, but perversely enough it may also be his most serious, most tragic and most shadowed by history, with the frothy Ernst Lubitsch-style comedy shot through with an overwhelming sense of loss.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's simultaneously terrifying and hilarious, a full-on shotgun blast to the face of rediscovered 1970s weirdness, something like finding out that there's a classic Peckinpah film you've never seen, or that Wes Craven and Bernardo Bertolucci got drunk in Sydney one weekend and decided to make a movie together.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    One of the greatest films of recent years.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    This film never feels like copycat Americana to me. Its vision of the bleak, ruined, urban-cum-rural landscape of Naples and environs is distinctively European and postmodern, redolent of the spiritual and physical desolation Antonioni captured so memorably in "Red Desert."
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    A breakthrough movie after its own fashion, a mysterious existential thriller that's brilliantly acted and masterfully directed, without a second of wasted screen time.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    One of the greatest of all Holocaust films.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    So ends this enormously important, and enormously extended, chapter of pop culture, with a combination of bang and whimper.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Has a lot of integrity, both in visual and conceptual terms, and seamlessly blends entertainment and education.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    Herzog wants us to see a deluded nobility in this quest. Treadwell's flawed dreams were, in the end, all too human.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    A richly detailed and enjoyable American yarn.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    Visually spectacular, with wide-screen cinematography from Nobuyasu Kita, impressive, full-scale sets and special effects and exhausting, immersive action scenes, 13 Assassins is pretty nearly the samurai classic it sets out to become.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    Force Majeure is a prickly moral comedy for grown-ups, full of sharply observed moments, spectacular scenery and masterfully manipulated atmosphere. This is very much a work of 21st-century global culture, but also one that draws on the great cinematic tradition of northern Europe, with hints of Ingmar Bergman, Eric Rohmer and Michael Haneke.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    Whatever moment of inspiration caused Spielberg to cast her (Sally Field) as Mary Todd Lincoln, it was sheer genius, because this is a role that demands bigness.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a fascinating film, full of drama, intrigue, tragedy and righteous indignation, but maybe its greatest accomplishment is to make you feel the death of one young man -- a truly independent thinker who hewed his own way through the world, in the finest American tradition -- as a great loss.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    It’s a career-capping performance by Dern, who is so convincing as an addled, drunken, embittered and probably dying man that he doesn’t appear to be acting, but Forte is just as good playing a preoccupied, emotionally constricted man-child.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew O'Hehir
    The real star of the film is not a person but a city, the vertiginous, exciting, massively overcrowded "maximum city" of Mumbai. On one hand, this environment of Dickensian, almost hallucinatory contrasts between rich and poor, good and evil feels perfect for Danny Boyle.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew O'Hehir
    A work of loopy, original comic genius.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Andrew O'Hehir
    The Kids Are All Right ranks with the most compelling portraits of an American marriage, regardless of sexuality, in film history.

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