Andrew O'Hehir

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For 1,423 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 65% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 33% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Andrew O'Hehir's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 70
Highest review score: 100 Tangerine
Lowest review score: 0 The In Crowd
Score distribution:
1,423 movie reviews
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Occasionally thrilling, sometimes hilarious and mostly absolute claptrap. Think of it as a lot like drinking a fourth cup of holiday eggnog: Not really a good idea at all, but you might have fun.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Seeing these four actors launching Reza's zingers at each other at high speed is pretty much worth the price of admission all by itself, and one thing you always know about Polanski is that he won't waste your time.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Although I personally still find the rubber-faced, pseudo-human figures produced by this technique unsettling, the work done by Spielberg and Jackson's animation teams here is exquisite.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Maggie Thatcher contains multitudes; she is rife with contradictions you can barely glimpse in this modestly affecting movie.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    I left the theater oddly exhilarated - to see daylight again was so great! - and, odder still, eager to see it again (although perhaps not today). Tarr's films can be arduous, even wrenching, but they're not boring. Watching them is something like visiting the world's most fantastic art museum and taking an ice-cold shower, both at the same time.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    If you're willing to suspend not just disbelief but also all considerations of logic and intelligence and narrative coherence, it's also a rip-roaring, fun adventure, fatefully balanced between high camp and boyish seriousness at almost every second.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    People will either love Detachment or hate it, and either way it provides powerful testimony to the unrivaled passion and undiminished craft of director Kaye, whose notoriety in the film industry is matched by his near-total invisibility to the general public.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This yarn about an innocent-looking but desperately horny teenage girl might not have that much commercial upside, but its bittersweet, faintly depressed brand of Nordic humor is definitely enjoyable.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    An entertaining diversion, mostly because Rossellini and Hurt are a pair of seasoned and graceful pros who know how to work every line and every gesture, and it's great to see them playing characters who are exactly their age.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Laranas does cultivate a mood of distinctive menace and mystery, not to mention a convoluted and ambitious chronology.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Although the character of Aladeen seems awfully predictable by Baron Cohen standards, the movie itself veers from one hilarious, absurd and patently offensive setup to the next.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Rock of Ages is an effulgent celebration of fakeness. It isn't trying to be real; it's trying to be faker than any fake thing has ever been before.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Moms and girls everywhere deserve this movie, absolutely, and I hope they have a great time. But they also deserve much more, and much better.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    There's definitely some empty-calories, summer-movie fun to be found in this ludicrous genre mashup, most of it courtesy of maniacal Russian director Timur Bekmambetov, who stages hilarious, imaginative, almost free-form action sequences like nobody in the business.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Pretty good summer flick!
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Savages is enjoyable in a way that's almost but not quite intentional camp; it's like eating a dinner made by a 7-year-old, with cake for every course, interspersed with Jell-O, Pepperidge Farm goldfish and chocolate sprinkles.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Like a Theodore Dreiser novel for our time, infused with the vivid, vulgar spirit of reality TV. It often had the sold-out Eccles Center howling, but also has elements of profound tragedy and allegory.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Total Recall is a doggone good time, with a bunch of nifty technical and visual flourishes, competently managed plot twists and elegant, Wachowski-esque action choreography that eventually becomes deadening because there's just too much of it and it's dialed up too high.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A lean, clean killing machine that supplies some dark, late-summer thrills and chills and breathes new life into a seemingly extinct franchise.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lawless offers a compelling, gruesome and instructive time-travel exercise.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Moody and a little slow, with muted colors and a half-empty, alien-feeling suburban setting, Danish director Ole Bornedal's The Possession is a nifty end-of-summer gift for horror buffs.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    If it's too subtle (and too similar to several other low-key indie romcoms) to make a big splash, it's got lovely performances and really builds strength as it goes along.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The Sessions should be taken for what it is, a sweet but minor fictional parable about the strange possibilities of love. You may find it significant, moving and even profound, but it has a limited connection to the real world and the real life of Mark O'Brien.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    One of the great things about Scott Thurman's film - a low-budget but thoroughly watchable documentary, largely funded on Kickstarter – is that it helped me see the world from McLeroy's point of view, which I might previously have considered impossible.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's entirely sincere and genuinely not terrible. Burns knows the milieu of his suburbanized New York Irish-American characters at a bone-deep level (enough to induce powerful flashbacks in someone of my background), and the tone of regretful, tragicomic, low-key melodrama he strikes is just right.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It’s masterfully shot and edited, with a brooding soundtrack and a mysterious, dreamlike undertow – and, when all is revealed, it’s not even half as interesting as it seems to be.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Rubberneck immediately put me in mind of the classic slow burn of vintage thrillers like Fritz Lang’s “M” and Michael Powell’s “Peeping Tom,” although Karpovsky and co-writer Garth Donovan have cited all kinds of other things, from “Michael Clayton” to “Caché” to “Fatal Attraction.”
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Brandon Cronenberg clearly understands that he has to deal with the legacy of his last name, and Antiviral feels to me like a perverse act of exorcism, half tribute and half cleansing ritual.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Michael Bay sends a clear message to those of us who've been making fun of him: He's been in on the joke the whole time.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    For me the breakthrough in At Any Price comes from 59-year-old Dennis Quaid, cementing his character-actor renaissance with what may be the nastiest role of his career.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It’s an enormous relief to have a lightweight but non-insulting date movie to recommend in this arid season. This isn’t a movie that requires your full attention at every second – although when Dyrholm and Brosnan are on-screen, you won’t be able to look away – but it’s a nifty entertainment that’s always easy on the eyes and gains just a bit of dramatic weight as it moves forward.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    As far as bored and cynical, playing-out-the-string comic-book action sequels go – hey, Iron Man 3 is a pretty good one!
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    There’s absolutely nothing wrong with Star Trek Into Darkness – once you understand it as a generic comic-book-style summer flick faintly inspired by some half-forgotten boomer culture thing. (Here’s something to appreciate about Abrams: This is a classic PG-13 picture, with little or no sex or swearing, but one that never condescends.)
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Watching a movie about the late trash-TV pioneer turns out to be fascinating, even when his story is told as messily as it is here.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Homemade as it clearly is, and first-drafty as it often feels, Whedon’s Much Ado will reward repeat viewings, for the adroitly paced dialogue, the debauched humor of the extended party scenes and the offbeat visual jokes.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A genuinely exciting thrill ride that only occasionally feels bloated or painfully dumb.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    If anything, it’s overstuffed with imagination and ideas, and when it comes to Hollywood movies I very much prefer that to the default setting. See it with an open mind, and you may well be surprised.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Pusher begins as a fairly standard ’90s crime saga, almost an open imitation of Quentin Tarantino... But something happens on the way to the film’s haunting and ambiguous conclusion.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is definitely a formula movie, lovingly and even obsessively so, made by someone who obviously enjoyed “American Pie” and numerous other raunchy-sweet teen sex comedies of the ’90s, and wished they existed for girls.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    2 Guns is both enjoyable trash and a fascinating snapshot of Hollywood’s current mentality when it comes to the United States government.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    As a visual symphony, The Canyons is often masterful, and while it may be pornographic in places, it’s never campy. At the center of its cold, beautiful and half-dead world is the almost incandescent Lindsay Lohan, burning like a flawed diamond.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    If Elysium isn’t the post-millennial sci-fi masterpiece I was hoping for, it has tremendous resonance and is pretty doggone good for its category.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    We’re the Millers has just the right stupid, humane vulgarity for the dog days of August.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    [An] evenhanded and carefully crafted documentary.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Don’t get me wrong, I like trash just fine, and the twisty-loo, triple-abduction plot of Prisoners certainly kept me watching to the end. (You’ll figure out some of screenwriter Aaron Guzikowski’s plot twists, but not all of them.) It’s the imitation-David Fincher pretentiousness that gets on my nerves.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a sweet, lively and funny movie rather than a fully realized one, but it makes clear that Gordon-Levitt has a natural feeling for cinema and should do more of it.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    CBGB has more of the original prankish punk spirit than it even recognizes.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Straightforward, a bit literal-minded, very faithful to the book and largely compelling.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It’s a highly capable sequel that drinks long and deep from the established Marvel legendarium and brings back all the key players from Kenneth Branagh’s 2011 hit “Thor.”
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Philomena turns out to be a subtly told tale of tragedy and redemption, with much of the sentimental payoff you’re expecting but several intriguing plot twists along the way.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It’s a highly enjoyable picture.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lone Survivor has no politics in the sense that it presents a more or less factual story about Luttrell and his comrades trying to fight their way out against overwhelming odds, and tells the truth that most of them didn’t make it. But the visual symbolism and the iconography of this movie are not apolitical or ideologically neutral at all.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a performance of great subtlety, not a caustic caricature: Rat (Cusack) still believes in something, probably still in some Platonic ideal of poetic possibility.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Much as I enjoyed watching most of it, I was deeply grateful when it was over and feel no strong desire to see the inevitable “Raid 3.”
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    There’s so much delusion and so much delight in Noah that I have trouble distinguishing one from the other, or determining whether its most outlandish flourishes qualify as mistakes or as strokes of genius.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It needs to seem cool enough that we want to watch it despite its obvious silliness, and viewed through that prism of canny analysis, the craftsmanship of “Winter Soldier” is first rate.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Donald Rumsfeld, then, is almost the perfect foil or adversary to Morris, and part of the absurd magic of Morris’ extended interviews with Rumsfeld is that they almost never feel adversarial.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It’s shot through with sadness and beauty, with dry humor, with the certainty that even things meant to last forever actually don’t.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Honestly, one can only wish that Hollywood made movies for non-teenagers and non-comics fans with this much care and reverence. Are superhero movies dying? Well sure, but you and I and the planet may die first.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    I basically really enjoyed this movie, even while lamenting that I was enjoying it under mendacious premises and that there was something fundamentally cynical about its elegiac, retrospective tone.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    While the whole thing feels weirdly miscalculated to me, A Million Ways to Die in the West tweaks the formula just enough, delivers a few laughs and keeps the guest stars coming.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Whatever its flaws, Maleficent is a family-friendly Disney adventure that offers a relaunched and thoroughly delightful Angelina Jolie.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    If you can tolerate watching it once, it will burrow into your brain and never get out again; your only recourse will be dragging your friends into the nightmare and seeing it again.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    After the fundamental problem of Coherence has become clear, or clear-ish – there’s another dinner party, at that other house, that looks an awful lot like this one – the movie becomes slightly too much like an unfolding mathematical puzzle, although an ingenious one that reaches a chilling conclusion.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    There are a number of terrific production numbers in Lucy, basically violent action scenes that border on slapstick, and as long as we agree in advance that the “science” in this movie goes beyond pseudo into total B.S., I believe you will leave satisfied.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Winterbottom's adaptation of the novel is spellbinding cinema, with all the atmosphere, technical excellence and expert pacing the British director is known for.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It’s a high-spirited, swashbuckling lark driven by cartoonish special effects and an ingenious double-layered nostalgia that allows it to become a virtual mixtape of ‘70s hits that predate its intended audience: “Hooked on a Feeling,” “The Piña Colada Song,” “Fooled Around and Fell in Love,” etc.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is not one of those Eisenhower-Little Rock moments where you get to feel warm and fuzzy about the power of the state being on the right side of history.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    With the genial pairing of Jennifer Aniston as a rich guy’s trophy wife and John Hawkes as a low-rent criminal at the center of a colorful cast and a pitch-perfect rendering of caste-divided Detroit, Life of Crime is a bittersweet end-of-summer surprise.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Can I tell you exactly what happens in Memphis, or what it’s “about”? Absolutely not. But it worked its magic on me, and its meaning is something I take on faith.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A subtle, underplayed psychological drama with terrific work by all three actors.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Amalric and cinematographer Christophe Beaucarne structure much of The Blue Room around Julien’s bewildered and increasingly disheveled face, as he tries (and fails) to understand the people around him.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    So this is the greatest Shyamalan movie ever made by someone else, or maybe it’s Christopher Nolan’s best impression of what a Shyamalan movie ought to be like. No doubt that sounds like a backhanded compliment, but I don’t entirely mean it that way.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Any thriller from first-time directors that starts out with a couple of teenagers in a Texas diner talking about legendary pulp novelist Jim Thompson has a super-steep hill to climb. Here’s what I can say for Bad Turn Worse... It may not make it all the way up that steep slope, but the effort is pretty doggone entertaining.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This could have been a story of immense heroism, tragic sacrifice and agonizing historical irony, and it hints in that direction, in its stiff-upper-lip fashion, before retreating into a vain search for a happy ending and an effort to turn itself into “The King’s Speech.”
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A rousing old-fashioned yarn with numerous exciting set-pieces and an uncomplicated hero you root for all the way through. It’s entertaining throughout and made with a high level of technical skill. If made 40 years ago, it would have been a leading Oscar contender and a huge hit, whereas today it’s a bit “meh” in both categories
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It’s all just a little more boring than it ought to be.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a sweet-tempered and small movie that’s not remotely trying to be hip.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Amira & Sam came along and swept me off my feet, like Fabio riding a stallion. It largely works thanks to Starr and Shihabi, a pair of likable and restrained actors who build slowly from tangible discomfort toward an unexpected passionate chemistry.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The 21st-century combo of screwball comedy and half-baked thriller in Wild Canaries isn’t exactly like anything you’ve seen before, and it offers an unpredictable ride that’s kind of fun, or at least sporadically simulates fun.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    A delicate and affecting drama with grace notes of mystery and redemption.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It’s clearly a directorial accomplishment to assemble this level of acting talent in one movie and come away with something so – well, “bad” is not sufficient to capture the idiot glory of this motion picture.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Another way of reading a movie like this is that it channels our ancient hatred of nature while recognizing that it’s essentially nostalgic, and that the occasional hungry ursine cannot compete with the animal we really have reason to fear.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    I enjoyed Age of Ultron more than its predecessor, despite the fact that it’s almost exactly the same thing. This was probably a result of adjusting my expectations: I wasn’t sitting there waiting for Whedon to revolutionize the genre, or to turn an overdetermined comic-book movie into a Noel Coward comedy. He delivers a clean and capable entertainment, with a handful of distinctive flourishes stuck to the margins.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The wonder of Tomorrowland – and with all its flaws and its hidebound Disney formula, it really is wonderful – is that Bird’s tale of nostalgia for the lost future manages to recapture some of that original, optimistic meaning without losing sight of the newer and darker one.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Spy
    McCarthy has much more to discover about herself as an actor and an avatar and a cultural signifier, and I hope she doesn’t get trapped by one role, one genre or one franchise. But her campaign of conquest is going well.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    The great strength and great weakness of the Yes Men, not to put too fine a point on it, is that they’re a couple of dorks. Their props, costumes and supporting materials are invariably crude – but they are sincere and unafraid, or at least unafraid enough to brazen it out.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It’s a lovely film that requires a little patience and a friendly disposition, and may be too low-impact to thrive amid a summer of grotesquely overengineered sequels.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It takes discipline in this age of bloat to bring your movie in under 80 minutes, closing credits included, and still make the audience feel we’ve been taken on a genuine journey with these people, a few big laughs and jagged left turns included.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    In its better, non-jizz-related moments, Ted 2 is a loosey-goosey stoner road trip with an irrelevant, appealing blend of innocence and sweetness: John and Sam doing a “Walk Like an Egyptian” dance number in the law library, for no particular reason, or the “Law & Order” theme-song lyrics, a bit of brilliant standup material stuck in the middle of a movie.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    This isn’t a perfect movie, but it might be the perfect summer movie for 2015.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    If the ambiguity of these stories may frustrate some viewers – we long to be clearly told which of these people are good, if any, and which bad – that is the ambiguity of the world, the ambiguity addressed by Heineman’s Michoacán friend with the bandana and the AK-47.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    Let’s give Allen full credit, by the way, for casting Posey as this wounded, sexy and emotionally rich middle-aged woman, a character enormously more interesting than Jill.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    In its own strange way, the tiny, mysterious and occasionally terrifying indie film Felt captures the confusion of this moment in gender relations, and especially the confusion around the term “rape culture.”
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    It’s a diverting ride, played out against spectacular locations, that repackages a whole bunch of familiar elements and attitudes: A little latter-day Bond, a little Jason Bourne, a little John le Carré, a little 1950s Hitchcock.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew O'Hehir
    What emerges in the end actually is surprisingly consistent and coherent, if you pay close attention to the most important passages of Kirk’s self-serving narrative and steer through all the denials and reversals and irrelevant tangents.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The second movie by "Being John Malkovich" writer Charlie Kaufman is even weirder than his first.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a parlor trick, but it's a hell of a good one.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Isn't much more than a student film made by a talented amateur who's in over his head. Burns has a decent eye and a breezy sense of pace, and he'll make better movies if he remembers where he came from.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    For the most part it's a blast.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It may be a haphazard mess, but it's actually pretty funny.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    I wanted to take these two characters somewhere else and make a real movie about them...But Vaughn provides so many spooky, hilarious, unhinged moments, you won't mind sitting through it.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    An engrossing, gem-hard little popcorn-cruncher.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    An endless battle scene in search of a movie. It's every bit as harrowing -- and also every bit as pointless and misguided -- as the botched military mission it depicts.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A chaste, lively and mildly goofy romance to dispel the winter blahs.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    As utterly disastrous movies go, this one's really got something.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It might be nice if Ghosts of Mars had more to offer than snappy repartee and shameless gore, or if it could borrow a little narrative tension from its Alien Chain Saw forebears.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Never quite establishes its own identity, and when you remember it in two years it's likely to be that movie you saw that you kind of liked with that girl in it, what's her name, from TV.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This version of the Potter saga is fun and harmless rather than memorable or imaginative. That's certainly no crime.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    OK, so Valentine is, like, this new serial-killer movie that totally blows. But kind of in a good way. Like, it's funny.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The resulting film directed by Scott Hicks is afflicted by terminal nostalgic drift. You come out of the theater with nothing more specific than half-pleasant memories of baseball gloves, Ferris wheels and vintage automobiles. I've had naps that were more exciting.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It remains a puzzling dream, vivid in detail and overly obvious in symbolism, fueled by half-digested lumps of malice and wonder.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    There's nothing unconventional or daring about On_Line, but considering how cheap it undoubtedly was to make, the acting, writing and direction all stand up pretty well; this is more intelligent and better structured than at least half the Hollywood movies I see.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The funny thing about all this is that a half-hour into Underworld I couldn't wait for it to be over. When it really was over, I couldn't wait for the next installment. Go figure.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The 76-year-old Zeffirelli will make many more movies, but Tea With Mussolini has the unmistakable feeling of a personal testament. Its sunny disposition and modest wit are well-suited to the genial temper of this born entertainer.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A fever dream about an aging, grasping, neurotic artist who brings his disastrous personal life, thinly veiled, into his work and ends up as a grotesque caricature of himself, alienating everyone who ever loved him.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Wag the Dog is such a crisply delivered political satire, so packed full of wickedly amusing details and expertly modulated performances and with its heart so obviously in the right place that I really, truly wish I could tell you it was also a good movie.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    In its quest to create "wholesome" entertainment, the movie industry is furiously turning back the clock four decades or so, to the days when men were men, girls were cute but knew their place and pencil-necked Poindexters stayed out of your damn face.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    An elegant but muddled affair, worth seeing despite (and maybe because of) its own split personality.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Après Vous offers nice sound design and an unfussy presentation of middle-class Paris. It comes and goes with no unpleasant aftertaste.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    5x2
    In the end I respected 5x2 more than I loved it. As we move backward in time, the distance between audience and characters inevitably widens -- we know what's going to happen and they don't -- and I found the effect a little astringent.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Yes
    For the most part Yes buzzes with visual life and imagination.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A lovely, faintly sinister travelogue.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It has, at times, a loopy, edgy humor and moments of genuinely affecting pathos. But somehow the combination doesn't add up to anything.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is an ambling, relaxed talking-head docu in the grand European style.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The kind of little indie you'll either hate or find impossible to resist. I fall into the latter camp, but can appreciate opposing views.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Reygadas is an undeniably important artist hewing his own path, but who is also self-consciously playing to the tastes of a tiny elite audience that craves obscurantism, confrontation and heavy-handed symbolism. Still, I really want you to see this. Then I'll have somebody to talk about it with.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This film is an inevitable product of our age, and enjoyable, right up to whatever your ickiness threshold is.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    At the risk of retreating into Waffle House aesthetic relativism, I think the unsettling power of Michael Winterbottom and Mat Whitecross' film stems from its contradictions.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    For me, the meticulous style, the fascination with ritualized (and ludicrous) violence and the film-geek self-referentiality all seem like markers of a film made by a young man, for other young men. If I were 23, and full to the brim with dark-hearted existentialism, I might love it too.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A cryptic and unsettling film.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Greenwald isn't capable of the magisterial, mournful manner of, say, Eugene Jarecki's "Why We Fight," but the two films would make a natural double bill.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The Last Kiss is more a capable-craftsman film than a work of genuine dramatic insight, but here and there it opens a window onto the terror and wonder of grown-up life, one its characters don't especially want to look through.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Many years in the making, Freida Lee Mock's documentary Wrestling With Angels paints an intimate and detailed portrait of playwright Tony Kushner, in the years since he became the most important living American dramatist. It's hard to avoid the conclusion that this is something of a booby prize.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Absolute Wilson changed my views of Wilson as a person tremendously, and at least gave me some useful context for his art.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    If Christensen's conventional plot is somewhat at odds with her downbeat realism, the idea that these characters are willing to fight like cats and dogs, and destroy each other and themselves, to avoid confronting their intense attraction to each other is totally convincing.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's essentially a mishmash of random ingredients, not very systematically presented and skewed to flatter its audience's presumed enlightenment.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    An alternately charming and frustrating comic entertainment.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    I think the movie is so restrained, and holds back so much on conventional plot and characterization, that its emotional impact is severely blunted. Nolte is excellent, I suppose, but we've seen this damaged-American-dude shtick from him before.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A tantalizing and beautiful picture made with tremendous integrity, and anchored by two marvelous performances, Isabel Coixet's The Secret Life of Words still, somehow, doesn't quite work.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Even as Sylvester Stallone's long goodbye to the heroic underdog who made him famous descends from pathos into silliness, and from fairy tale into hallucination, you can't help liking the big galoot.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Zbanic is such an acute observer of women's lives in their intimate details, and constructs such fine scenes, that I think this might be the best film to emerge from the aftermath of the Balkan conflict.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A bit pedantic, but thorough and interesting throughout, a must for history buffs.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a tepidly amusing film that will offend no one, including those it claims to skewer.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Offers an intriguing, and profoundly frustrating, view of the New York underground hero whose 1962 erotic fantasy "Flaming Creatures" paved the way for Andy Warhol, John Waters, the "queer cinema" explosion and pretty much anybody who's ever made a movie starring his friends in weird Salvation Army outfits.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Fundamentally, it's a well-executed formula movie, perfect for first-date couples or miscellaneous group outings.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A handsome and well-acted film -- if you like that bitten-off, half-Hemingway style -- but also a grim, emotionally strangled one with a strong sadistic current, no genuinely likable characters and almost no humor.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A sunny, cheerful, thoroughly artificial concoction, going nowhere with no particular speed. Still, better than your average airplane movie.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a perfectly cheerful time at the movies, without any hint of drama or surprise.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Despite its schizophrenic nature and often disagreeable characteristics, Broken English has flashes of something. You might say it has an integrity of purpose, if not of execution.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Whatever we may make of van Gogh's life and death, Buscemi's talky, stagey Interview -- the first of three van Gogh adaptations planned by American actor-directors -- doesn't make much of a case for him as an important or original artist.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The film's intimacy never feels fake, it's sporadically and unpredictably funny (I didn't exactly enjoy the cacophonous trumpet duet of the "1812 Overture," but I won't soon forget it), and the nonprofessional cast is surprisingly good.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lee Harvey Oswald's guilt or innocence or accomplices are not the point of the film; Stone is more interested in the fact that much about the Kennedy murder is now so shrouded in myth and mystification as to be permanently unknowable, and that that fact alone has gnawed away at the self-confidence of middle-class white America ever since.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is going to be a notorious film that young audiences will be daring themselves to see, but it's actually funnier, darker and more troubling before it turns into a carnival of repeated dismemberment.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Brian De Palma's Redacted doesn't quite work as a movie. But it works as SOMETHING.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    About midway through Denzel Washington's new film The Great Debaters comes a raw and terrifying scene that exemplifies why the movie's worth seeing, despite its hackneyed and awkward story.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    If Paranoid Park is mainly an accumulation of the signs and symbols and images inside Van Sant's own head, that's artistically legitimate. When he makes a feeble effort to connect Alex's plight to the Iraq war and the cultural climate of Bush-era America, I just don't buy it.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Beckinsale tackles the downscale role manfully, but Rockwell is nearly unrecognizable as the pudgy, suicidally depressed, chronically inept Glenn, who's acting out a half-convincing portrayal of himself as a born-again Christian.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    21
    Spacey's engaging for a while in one of his patented double-edged, sharky roles.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's literally difficult to believe that the person who made this picturesque, clueless, oddly misanthropic picture also made "Annie Hall" and "Crimes and Misdemeanors."
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Arguably, A Girl Cut in Two is more fun around the edges, as an assemblage of bizarre supporting characters and throwaway comic bits, than it is down the middle, as a classic French morality tale.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This third-act redemption raises Towelhead several notches, but it still ends up feeling like a well-acted and well-intentioned after-school special, a long way from the vividness and texture of Ball's television work.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    So subtle and subdued that it nearly undercuts itself. I'd describe it, in fact, as a film that doesn't quite work -- but the way it doesn't work is so distinctive and so interesting that it marks Jenkins as an exciting new face on the American indie scene.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Director and co-writer Jonathan Glatzer handles his talented cast well, and the movie is dark, droll and sentimental in roughly the correct proportions. Worth a look.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Shrink offers a roster of wonderfully eccentric characterizations, shoehorned into a dramatic structure that's just a little too formulaic.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    An agreeably chewy, pulpy work of old-fashioned crime cinema, a fair bit overcooked and overlong, but worth catching for its acting, its atmosphere and its action set-pieces.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    That whole meta-biographical aspect doesn't bug me much because everybody who's ever written or directed a romantic comedy is drawing on their own emotional experience; this one's just a little more obvious about it.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's an ambitious, uneven, surprisingly talky melodrama.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    I enjoyed it immensely, flat-footed dialogue and implausible situations and all. Which doesn't stop me from believing that in its totality Secretariat is a work of creepy, half-hilarious master-race propaganda almost worthy of Leni Riefenstahl, and all the more effective because it presents as a family-friendly yarn about a nice lady and her horse.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    If a movie can be both exciting and boring at the same time, that movie would be Unstoppable an adrenaline-infused runaway-train flick that perfectly distills director Tony Scott's talents and limitations.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lomborg has clearly been stung by the suggestion that he's a front man for know-nothingism, and Cool It is an agreeable and partly successful attempt to repair his image.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Entirely watchable and often pretty fun, in a mishmashed, patchy kind of way.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    If it's a nonsensical patchwork quilt, it's mostly a watchable one.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The pleasant surprise when you actually watch Insidious is that it turns out to be a moderately effective suburban-family creep show, majorly in debt to "Poltergeist" and "The Exorcist" and capturing at least a little of their spirit.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's almost really cool, without quite being really cool.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    My eyes never left the screen and my attention never wandered; in a restricted, technical sense of the term, Kidnapped is a masterpiece. But I make no claims for its moral value or for any cathartic or redemptive qualities.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    As to the question of whether Circumstance is actually a good film, or just one with an important story to tell, a high degree of difficulty and some hot all-girl action, I think the verdict is mixed.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a generically enjoyable action film with a bit of hardboiled based-on-a-true-story-ness about it, and since it's set in the '80s and feels like an '80s movie, it seems a lot like something you must have seen years ago.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Tower Heist is funny in the way of so many Hollywood comedies, meaning that individual scenes are often crisply written and played, but the whole doesn't add up to anything.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    To my taste, savvy Hollywood veteran Bill Condon debuts as director of the two-part "Twilight" conclusion in satisfying fashion, delivering a voluptuous if often inert spectacle that splits the difference between high camp and decadent romance.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    I simultaneously want to endorse its ambition and nerve and report that it's a very mixed bag.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Unlike most issue-oriented documentaries about the abundant idiocy of the human species and the imminent demise of our planet, Mark S. Hall's Sushi: The Global Catch offers foodies and sushi buffs a refreshing palate-cleanser before the parade of experts and the dire news reports.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    While the portrayal of Southern race relations in the '60s is less central here than in "The Help," it's also less labored and earnest, and one could argue that it's subtler, more intimate and more honest.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    LUV
    Both for good and for ill, LUV has a film-school feeling about it, and channels a legacy of fatalistic American crime cinema that includes "Mean Streets" and "Treasure of the Sierra Madre."
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    In the end The Silence is more like an intriguing work of misdirection than a great crime film, but it has a dreamlike and disturbing undertow you won’t soon forget, and Odar is unquestionably a director to watch.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Haneke's new Funny Games has a current of bleak humor that comes through more clearly when you're not reading subtitles. It remains a horrifying, implacable mind-fuck, liable to be widely misunderstood and widely despised.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    I never stopped being interested in The Place Beyond the Pines, and never stopped rooting for Cianfrance to make the hubristic ambition of his immense tripartite scheme pay off, even as it evidently falls apart.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This piece of midsummer madness is undeniably silly and delusional, a dire political fable told as tongue-in-cheek pastiche.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Lee Daniels’ The Butler is big, brave, crude and contradictory, very bad in places and very good in others, and every American should see it.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    The singer Pink, also known as Alecia Moore, here plays Dede, one of the group’s only female members, and the connection between Dede and Neil, which at first stretches credibility to the breaking point, may be the best thing about “Thanks for Sharing.”
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Disney World, in this incoherent but often amazing work of American psychodrama, has a lot in common with the Overlook Hotel of “The Shining,” the Venice of “Death in Venice” and the booze-soaked Cuernavaca of “Under the Volcano.” It’s a zone of existential dread, the place where masculine dreams go to die, the place where the unburied ghosts of civilization rise up like Mouse-eared, three-fingered zombies and bite us in the ass.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Citizen Koch is kind of a mess. But it’s a mess well worth discovering for yourself.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    22 Jump Street is the good-natured, sloppily rendered pile of balderdash for that moment, a movie that’s immune to all criticism and not worth bothering to dislike.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    This film is never less than pleasant to spend time with, and that’s not a minor consideration when it comes to summer moviegoing.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Sometimes a story – a true story, a fictional one or a hybrid of the two – is sufficiently powerful and intriguing that it can break through the formula and packaging around it. Such is almost but not quite the case with The Theory of Everything.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Wild the movie has a curiously unsticky and unmemorable quality, as if it had melted along the journey, a Sierra Nevada snowball in the Mojave Desert. It has the same nearly invisible flaws as “Dallas Buyers Club,” Vallée’s last agreeable pop-anthropology fable of fall and redemption, but writ larger: It’s just that little bit prepackaged, it stands off from us a little too far. It wants us to feel, but not to feel anything dangerous.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Aided by witty and understated work from Baldwin and Stewart and the capable direction of Glatzer and Westmoreland, Moore does her utmost to pull Still Alice toward the realm of meaningful social drama. Let’s put it this way: It’s a way better movie than it ought to be, but not good enough to escape its pulpy, mendacious roots.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    If I had the power to turn back time and start the tortuous production process that led to the “Hobbit” trilogy over again, with a different director in charge and a completely different approach, I would do it. But that’s precisely the problem with the One Ring, right? Once you put it on you are changed, and those changes cannot be undone.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Some fragments of that Dostoevskian romance linger on here: Just enough so that Wyatt and Wahlberg nail the climactic scene, when Jim is literally playing for his life, and make it momentarily seem to mean something. But not quite enough that you’ll remember what that something might be the next day.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    There’s enough unfulfilled possibility in True Story to make it an intriguing introduction to this story of deception and self-deception, but the balance between true-crime cable soap and the darker, richer layers of Franco’s performance never quite adds up.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Ultimately I’m going to vote with my heart and say you should see it, largely for the brooding, physical performance of Tom Hardy, an actor still a shade too peculiar for Hollywood stardom, along with the ominous evocation of Stalin’s Russia on the cusp of change. But that recommendation comes with many asterisks, and in various respects Child 44 is a lost opportunity or, as they teach us to say in film-critic academy, an “interesting failure.”
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    Jurassic World unquestionably “delivers.” It feels like a hit; it offers a professionally crafted blend of blandness, predictability, watered-down cultural commentary and manufactured excitement.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew O'Hehir
    A discombobulated summer movie that’s kind of fun but doesn’t have nearly enough story to fill up two hours.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Perfectly acceptable entertainment in the Mouse Factory's most familiar vein.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    The best thing I can say about it is that the costumes and the hambone acting keep it from being a deadly bore.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's almost as lame-brained as any Hollywood blockbuster, if prettier and more pretentious.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Although his (Eastwood's) intentions are good, he simply isn't capable of the wry, wistful blend of humor and sadness this story desperately needs.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Bleach out the colors, backdate the wardrobes, insert Gary Cooper and Rosalind Russell and you've got one of Frank Capra's lesser films.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    You may find yourself spellbound or colossally irritated; it's a close call either way.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Does become more engaging as it lurches along, perhaps because you give up hoping that anything will really happen and settle into the Nicolas Roeg-meets-David Lynch-at-the-cast-party-for-"Taxi Driver" atmosphere of mid-'70s nothingness.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Such a feebleminded, good-natured comedy that it actually makes you laugh with that timeless gag of somebody pretending to cough while calling someone else a bad name.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Isn't the worst film in the world, but its vision of reality seems so stylized, so fake, that I came out of it wondering whether it has the slightest idea what it's talking about.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Once again, the filmmaker gets incredibly wobbly at the end of his story, and his resolution of both the alien incursion and of Graham's crisis of faith feels more like a cheap trick than the product of a genuine belief in anything at all.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Herman Boone was no doubt a terrific football coach, but the lessons to be drawn from his success in Alexandria are ambiguous, and Remember the Titans is too wrapped up in its weepy macho sentimentality to address them clearly.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Some viewers may find this movie sexist or misogynist simply based on its premise, but it's a mistake to take Greenaway's symbolic narratives too literally.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a sloppy, fun, late-'80s style Hong Kong action flick full of pogo-dancing zombies and voracious vampires who look vaguely like Siamese cats with spoiled cottage cheese cooked onto their faces.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's long. Long movies almost always mean the audience member has time to think, and in this context that's not a good thing.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Alone among the cast, Farrell seems to understand that this movie -- which is lazy and stoned, for all its loud music -- needed somebody to go ape-shit, to pretend to give a crap or at least to have fun.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's not merely that these subjects have already been satirized to the point of ultimate tedium; more importantly, Simone just isn't very funny.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Basically brings home the bacon for horror fans -- it offers decent special effects and a nice array of those moments where you shriek and jump and nearly pee your pants but it turns out to be Mom or the cat after all.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    But imagination and energy are often not enough. On balance, this is the dumbest of the entries in Hollywood's anti-consumerist new wave.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a highly enjoyable summer thrill ride with an action heroine who likes to be on top, literally and figuratively.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Add Christopher Walken, giving one of his patented demented performances as a Kurtz-esque mining tycoon deep in the Amazon jungle, along with some vague Hollywood politics about labor exploitation, and The Rundown is far too cheerful and good-hearted to be terrible.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Isn't a terrible movie, but it is a tremendous disappointment.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Thoroughly enjoyable, but not because it's any good.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    When you watch Greenwald's barrage of pirated Fox News footage -- his filmmaking techniques are clearly testing the outer limits of the "fair use" doctrine, and may yet land him in court -- it's an overwhelming experience well beyond the hoot-inducing moments.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    The satire doesn't go far enough.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    If a movie can be fascinating and tedious at the same time, Inside Deep Throat -- which more or less depicts the America I have just described -- is that movie.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    I'm always grateful to practice a little affirmative action on behalf of grade-C sleaze movies with a budget you could probably locate in your sofa cushions or your dryer, and Tim McCann's digital-video opus Nowhere Man is a fine example of the species.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    I feel prodigious emotion underneath the pretty, preserved features of The Ballad of Jack and Rose, channeled into a vehicle that's a half-successful imitation of "You Can Count on Me" or "In the Bedroom."
    • 33 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    The good news is that Duchovny has an undeniable feel for this medium, and a fine rapport with actors.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    In addition to possessing the most confusing title of the year, Canadian filmmaker Michael Dowse's high-energy dance-club saga It's All Gone Pete Tong arrives in an elaborate package of spoof and deception that should win the admiration of any practical-joke connoisseur.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Amid the infoglut that surrounds us, Gibney's film feels too much like more noise. Is it telling the most important business story of our lifetimes, or is it just another fantastical yarn, crammed into the schedule after Scott and Laci Peterson, but before Charlemagne and the ancient Peruvian astronauts?
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's pretentious highbrow trash, but as far as that goes it works pretty well.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Setting such larger aesthetic questions aside, there isn't much to dislike about The Longest Yard, at least once you've gotten used to the pervasive fear of homosexuality that seems to ooze from the film's pores.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Horror fans should see this, at least in geeky admiration for what it pulls off, but in the long run it's no more than a crisp footnote to genre history.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Wild Side is sometimes maddening to watch, but will haunt you for days afterward.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    As enjoyable as Close is, Heights as a whole is a mannered simulation that only occasionally and accidentally feels like real New York life.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a meticulous nest of interlocking elements, not at all haphazard. But in its unrelieved bleakness and singularity of vision, it supplies very little in the way of conventional movieness.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    If the resulting film doesn't work equally well at all levels, Wood (who starred in "Thirteen") gives an astonishing performance that pushes it most of the way there.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is one of those movies destined to be watched by family groups who can't agree on what to see: You'll all get a few chuckles, and then it's home for dessert.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Isn't exactly bad and isn't exactly good. It's raw in some places and overcooked in others.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    I'd have no problem with the element of rampant, half-wacky speculation at the outer edges of physics in these movies if they came labeled as such.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Of course, the very existence of someone like Willmott -- a black university professor who can make an angry, ruthless satire about American racism with impunity -- suggests that we're still a long way from living in the CSA.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Perhaps understandably, these artifacts of a vastly different ideological and economic era -- have become kitsch objects, the focus of a half-horrified nostalgia, in the midst of the feverish Chinese boom.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's kind of a mess. An agreeable, even lovable mess, but still a mess.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Mediocre raunchy comedy.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    The hectic, sprawling Fanfan la Tulipe eventually feels like too much -- too many goofy asides, too much Comédie Française hambone acting, too much gallantry and villainy, too much forced good cheer.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    For me, Franken is funniest at his least guarded and his most incorrect, and as he inches toward becoming a politician himself, we get less and less of that.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    A trashy thriller of the kind that used to make up the second half of double bills in crumbling downtown theaters, circa 1977.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a glimpse into a world most secular, metropolitan liberals never see, and it's likely to induce howls of both terror and hilarity from big-city audiences.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    I suspect this guy can make a good movie if he learns the right lessons; he's made about half of one here. But the praise heaped upon A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints is way too much, way too soon.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's a compact and symmetrical picture with all its plot points in the right places, but I never found it convincing in the slightest.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    A winsome, charming and irresistibly romantic picture, and also a profoundly self-involved one that has nothing whatever to do with Iraq or war or much of anything else besides the butterfly-like spirit of Roberto Benigni. But I guess that combination makes it a great holiday selection choice for certain disheveled, liberal family groups. Mine, for instance.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    An uneven but impressively ambitious picture.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Puccini for Beginners may divide individual audience members. It divided me; rarely have I seen a film simultaneously so good and so bad.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It might be too slow and morbid for American viewers without an existing interest in the subject.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Whole New Thing comes unglued toward the end, spiraling into melodrama without ever escaping its whiny, indie-rock soundtrack.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    I found the interlocking bitterness of Ayckbourn's play irritating and overly neat, and these people don't seem to belong to Paris or London or anywhere else, at least not anytime in the last 20 years.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    So stylized and slow-moving (even at a spare 75 minutes) that you may have trouble adapting to its hypnotic rhythms -- but if you can, there are sumptuous visual rewards to be found, plus the faintest emotional uptick right at the end.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Evening feels like one of those devil's-candy productions that aim to bring artistry to a large audience, specifically a large audience of adult women who don't often go to the movies. Even considering it in that light, I found it miscalculated and overcooked.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    The whole thing is handsomely mounted, with plenty of Goya paintings and supposed observations about the ironies of history and the cyclical nature of life, etc. Forman's always been a huckster, but I never thought I'd see him waste this many good actors on a movie this bad.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    The movie never fails to be crisply written and cannily delivered, but it's way too steeped in TV-culture inside jokes for its own good, and August's attempts to suffuse the whole thing with ontological or theological meaning are ultimately pretty dumb.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    The evident strengths and laudable intentions of Before the Devil Knows You're Dead (and even the appeal of Marisa Tomei in her undies) are overwhelmed by an implausible plot verging on unintentional comedy and a panoply of Noo Yawk dirt-bag supporting characters who might've seemed awkward on a 1993 episode of "NYPD Blue."
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's the film's reassuring, almost hypnotic visual rhythms, along with its Hollywood-like narrative structure -- which is closer to "Drumline" or "Bring It On" than to most documentaries -- that make it bearable.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    The film has moments of goofy delight, some pseudo-David Lynch spookery and a couple of comic supporting turns.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    There's almost no such thing as an entertaining holiday trifle anymore -- the kind of casual, cheerful little picture that you might see on a whim and end up enjoying, even beyond the breadth of your modest expectations. The Perfect Holiday is an attempt, at least, to resurrect the idea of the trifle
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    If you liked "Rocky Balboa" you should be in good shape, since it's exactly the same movie, just aimed at a teeny-tiny-bit younger demographic and with an affectless leading man who avoids hambone acting by not acting at all.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    My Blueberry Nights may not quite be what fans of either Jones or Wong Kar-wai -- directing his first film in English -- are expecting. It's a late-night, lovelorn mood piece in a minor key, not complicated or convoluted, finally more confection than substance.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    I'm not big on those Pauline Kael-style encomiums to great actors in mediocre material, but that's exactly what we've got here. Stevenson is so incandescent -- so funny, so vulnerable, so awkwardly sexy.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's an exceptionally well-made example of the kind of delirious, semi-Gothic, overcooked melodrama filmmakers from the Boot have long specialized in.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Deliciously dumb, reasonably well-made.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Alternately winsome and irritating documentary.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    This isn't a boring movie or a dishonest one. But it's a relentlessly literal-minded one, light on vision and atmosphere, that moves through the history of the Germs with a checklist.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    A charming but silly love letter to a vanished era of urban bohemia?
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Van Damme's remarkable performance -- I say this in all seriousness -- comes pretty close to redeeming the picture's murky and overly complicated artistic intentions.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    A self-indulgent and icky film, but reasonably well made and undeniably addictive.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    This Friday the 13th is glossy, good-looking garbage, acted out by a cast of big-chested androids (male and female alike) and with the original series' rough edges smooved over. It's reasonably entertaining.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    High-style goofballing and globetrotting can get you pretty far, but maybe not as far as Johnson wants us to go.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    9
    Actually, the problem with wunderkind director Shane Acker's "stitchpunk" animated fantasy 9 isn't so much that it bears a sped-up, dumbed-down resemblance to "The Lord of the Rings," although it does. It's more that Acker's dark and whimsical creation, so clearly in the tradition of his mentor Tim Burton, is wondrous to behold but offers only an indifferent and generic mishmash of quest fantasy and post-apocalyptic science fiction when it comes to story.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Beyond that educational element and the delicate performances of Dancy and Byrne, I found Adam dramatically limp, predictable and in a curious way even retrograde.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Gandini makes it seem as if the nation of Dante and Fellini has been conquered by "Girls Gone Wild." As hyperbolic cases go, that's a pretty delicious one, but it's not quite true yet.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's too convoluted by half, and turns what ought to be an idiosyncratic, delightful folktale-film into a baffling personal psychodrama with a nasty sting in its tale. Still, Breillat wouldn't be Breillat if she made movies that were easy to like, or to get your head around.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Yes, yes, yes, Downey is blasé, intelligent and hilarious as Tony Stark -- what do you expect me to say? -- but I'm convinced that sticking with this character much longer won't be good for him.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Roy is like a meta-Cruise or a Cruise pastiche; even the disturbing, stalkerish aspects of his character seem as if they were constructed from tabloid stories about the actor's marriage, his religious affiliation, his sexual identity.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    An uneven but surprising movie, often outrageously funny and just as often completely flat.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    A very mixed bag. Despite some faint gestures in the direction of journalistic balance, it plays a lot like a two-hour infomercial for the Playboy publisher's historical importance, philosophical depth and personal greatness.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Taken on its own terms, it's a light, sweet, curiously enjoyable misfit romance, whose real star is not Aniston but her magnificently awkward Lothario, Jason Bateman.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    So some good acting and decent scares get entombed within too many dull postmodern iterations.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    I don't mean that this movie is strikingly good or strikingly bad, in cosmic terms -- it's a solid but totally forgettable entertainment, redeemed somewhat by Barrymore's loud, horsey laugh and some agreeably racy comic situations.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    A middling little movie that tries to trespass on Bergman-Renoir territory and simply isn't adroit enough to pull it off, and because in its weaker moments it's overheated and silly.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    A very mixed bag. It's an oddly dry fusion of documentary and narrative film that arguably doesn't quite click on either level.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Ultimately, though, it's a little schizo, like a depressed dude in a clown suit, or a Theodore Dreiser novel hopped up on not enough happy pills.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Paranormal Activity 2 suffers from the excessive expository blah-blah that's so common in horror-movie sequels.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    If Client 9 plays a lot like a murky, gripping political thriller, it lacks a fully satisfying ending -- or a fully satisfying hero.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Made in Dagenham offers girl power in a can, lightly seasoned with swinging London and topped with cute-clumsy Sally Hawkins charming us to pieces. But the real women of Dagenham deserve better, and so do their sisters in the audience.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    It's difficult to make this mediocre adaptation of perhaps the best-loved book in C.S. Lewis' Narnia series -- seem particularly interesting.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    This is a pale simulacrum of those high-style travel-porn thrillers of the '60s and '70s, which only serves to remind us that those aren't as easy to pull off as they look, and also that maybe they weren't so great in the first place.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew O'Hehir
    Her (Taymore) interpretations and interpolations range from brilliant to indifferent to extremely silly; as Taymor surely knows, there's nothing especially revolutionary in asking Helen Mirren to play the central role of Prospera.

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