Andrew Pulver
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For 36 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 36% higher than the average critic
  • 11% same as the average critic
  • 53% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Andrew Pulver's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Let's Get Lost
Lowest review score: 40 The Samaritan
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 13 out of 36
  2. Negative: 0 out of 36
36 movie reviews
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew Pulver
    It's not exactly a documentary, more a lovingly-filmed homage, but some candid interview material allows scraps of Baker's story to emerge.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    What results is an immensely detailed overview of Marley's life and times, from the hillside Jamaican shack where he grew up to the snowy Bavarian clinic where he spent his last weeks in a fruitless attempt to cure the cancer that killed him in 1981, aged 36.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    It's the successul synthesis of the two – action and emotion – that means this Spider-Man is as enjoyable as it is impressive: Webb's control of mood and texture is near faultless as his film switches from teenage sulks to exhilarating airborne pyrotechnics.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    Let's hope Klayman gets to make a sequel.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    Bujalski really has pulled off something extraordinary here.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    Black's performance is a revelation: foregoing his usual repertoire of jiggling, tics and head-waggling craziness, Black ensures Tiede is a satirical creation of considerable substance. Really impressive.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    People are unlikely to charge out of the cinema with quite the same level of glee as they did in 2009; but this is certainly an astute, exhilarating concoction.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    It's ambitious enough to aim at polished, intelligent character drama, and pulls it off successfully.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    Junger articulates a number of subtle and unexpected ideas about Hetherington's work, and about combat reporting in general.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    With this film, Anderson has built a thoroughly likable vision of a prewar Europe – no more real, perhaps, than the kind of Viennese light-operetta that sustained much of 1930s Hollywood – but a distinctive, attractive proposition all the same. It's a nimblefooted, witty piece, but one also imbued with a premonitory sadness at the coming conflagration.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    '71
    It's a film that holds you in a vice-like grip throughout; only wavering towards the end with a faintly preposterous climactic shootout.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    In its current state, Neighbors is filthy, nasty and a bit too sloppy. But it’ll scrub up lovely.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Pulver
    The way the allegory works out is not exactly subtle or unexpected, but is strangely moving, despite the gruesomeness that has gone before. All in all, a treat.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Pulver
    It's a slight, attractive tale: a childlike fable of a little girl and her preternaturally intelligent cat that swiftly devolves into a very old-school cops and robbers yarn.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Pulver
    All in all, this is a carefully modulated plea for tolerance and mutual understanding.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Pulver
    This fantastically depressing film ought to be shown in school assemblies, or wherever impressionable pre-teens gather to discuss their dreams of media stardom.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Pulver
    She's entertaining enough, and like most fashion documentaries, it's a mine of pop-cultural history, but the unswervingly generous assessment of her achievements and permanently arch vocal style become a little wearying.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Pulver
    Promised Land seems to lose its nerve a little politically: as it goes on, you realise it isn't about fracking at all, but a tract on machiavellian corporate behaviour and their employees' self-deception.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Pulver
    The whole film ends up feeling weighed down: though Man of Steel bounds from one epic setpiece to another, you're left with the nagging feeling that you just can't work out what the central twosome see in each other. And for Superman and Lois Lane, that's hardly ideal.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Pulver
    The sisters themselves reveal a little, mostly because of Serena's unguarded imperiousness; but as a study of sports supercelebrity it's a tad subdued.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Pulver
    Pacific Rim's wafer-thin psychodrama and plot-generator dialogue provides little for the human component to get their teeth into.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Pulver
    For Cash devotees who want a hitherto-hidden perspective on their man, though, this is invaluable viewing.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Pulver
    This Anchorman sequel knows who its fans are, and does its best to keep them happy. No one will be complaining.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Pulver
    A genial, lightweight farce, which largely approximates Hornby's distinctively bittersweet tone.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Andrew Pulver
    Impressive as much of his film is, however, Aronofsky never quite solves the main challenge of the semi-literal biblical adaptation: what is so economical, and beautifully expressed, on the page can become a heavy, lumbering beast when translated into conventional narrative.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Pulver
    Binoche rises above the lubricious material by giving a thoroughly detailed and committed performance as the journalist.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Pulver
    A clotted, knotted, twisty noir that is, unfortunately, short on the required atmosphere.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Pulver
    There's undoubtedly a good film to be made out of the scramble for oil in the Arabian desert in the 1920s – but this, for all its herculean efforts, is not it.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Pulver
    The furrowed-brow seriousness of X-Men is its least attractive quality, but that is the mood that dominates in this film. It's hard to see how anyone other than hardcore fans will find much to entertain them.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Pulver
    By itself, this would just be one of those workmanlike relationship films the French turn out by the yard; but all the Allen stuff throws its mediocrity into sharp relief.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Pulver
    Like the first one, it's played for laughs in-between bouts of mayhem; most of the gags are off-target, though Mirren's Nancy Mitfordesque assassin gets a pretty good kill ratio.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Pulver
    Filmed in what you might call the international hotel style, Tornatore's idiotic premise is entertaining if you don't inspect it too carefully, or look for anything beneath the portentousness.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Pulver
    This is basically a studied and serious film, but there's a feyness to its tone, and a lethargy to its pacing that make it difficult to warm to, even if the principal actors give it their all.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Pulver
    I'd never want to stand in the way of artists pushing things, but messing with Postman Pat is probably a step too far.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Pulver
    [A] blundering jackhammer of a film.