Andrew Schenker
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For 195 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 21% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 75% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.9 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Andrew Schenker's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 50
Highest review score: 100 Stray Dogs
Lowest review score: 0 Act of Valor
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 71 out of 195
  2. Negative: 62 out of 195
195 movie reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew Schenker
    Béla Tarr is the cinema's greatest crafter of total environments and in The Turin Horse, working in his most restricted physical setting since 1984's Almanac of Fall, he (along with co-director Ágnes Hranitzky) dials up one of his most vividly immersive milieus.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Andrew Schenker
    Tsai isn't making a social-problem film here, and his critique of patriarchal control is secondary to his portrait of unbearable psychic conditions.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Andrew Schenker
    Frederick Wiseman's At Berkeley isn't only a study of the contemporary American university, but, like all of the filmmaker's best documentaries, a wide-ranging inquiry into the larger institutions and contradictions that define life in the United States.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Andrew Schenker
    Order may be restored to the Circus, the "bad" elements weeded out, but in the jaundiced world the film has spent the last two hours so effectively delineating, the barriers between good and evil have been shown to be essentially meaningless.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Andrew Schenker
    A boldly conceived assemblage of diverse and seemingly random fictional materials, Athina Rachel Tsangari's Attenberg is concerned with nothing less than those hardy perennials: sex, death, and modernity. And coming of age a little too late.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Andrew Schenker
    A sense of anachronism is what provides the film with its melancholy heart.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Andrew Schenker
    In Joshua Oppenheimer's extraordinary The Act of Killing, film becomes the medium for a bold historical reckoning--and in more ways than one.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 88 Andrew Schenker
    Although the film remains continually fanciful, it always reminds us of the stakes in which precocious childhood rubs up against the possibility of a childhood denied altogether.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Andrew Schenker
    Nothing is forced in Ryan Gielen's deceptively simple story, with the pressures bubbling forth as naturally as the good cheer that defines so much of the film.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Andrew Schenker
    Jason Tippet and Elizabeth Mims refuse to use their subjects as test cases for any sort of larger thesis.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Andrew Schenker
    Not only sets up the writer's life as representative of the transitions of early modern Jewish life, but posits his oeuvre as an ongoing chronicle of the shift from a vibrant, unified Yiddish culture to a fractured world-in-exile.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 75 Andrew Schenker
    Shawn Levy's occasionally uproarious, warm-hearted comedy is about different generations educating each other, but it never seems rote.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Andrew Schenker
    Alejandro Landes's Porfirio is an ugly movie to watch, but it's not without purpose.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Andrew Schenker
    Thanks to Melanie Lynskey's performance, the movie feels like a believably worked-out, sympathetically presented study in thirtysomething uncertainty.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Andrew Schenker
    Shat makes Our Idiot Brother work is the endless appeal of watching Rudd's lovable idiot run roughshod over the sophisticated New York mini-universe while winning the confidence and admiration of everyone around him.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Andrew Schenker
    The mixture of different techniques and varied views results in a rich, multi-faceted look at one of America's most misguided policy initiatives.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Andrew Schenker
    The film successfully positions its point of view with the developing countries that suffer the most immediate consequences of global warming rather than the developed countries most responsible for climate change and from whose citizenry Jon Shenk's prospective audience is likely to be drawn.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Andrew Schenker
    Rachid Bouchareb casts his account of the horrifying aftermath of tragedy on an intimate scale, allowing the halting words and frightened faces of his two leads to tell us as much as we need to know about the uncertainties of those faced with tracking down their lost loved ones.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Andrew Schenker
    What emerges is a portrait of a fully committed band that could never quite make it and of the rock n' roll project as something between a (very serious) hobby and a full-time career.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Andrew Schenker
    The film unfolds in unhurried dramatic terms that come to take on an almost fatalistic force.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Andrew Schenker
    The director's clear-minded approach allows her subject's more challenging aesthetic-political mix to shine through, even if it's at the inevitable expense of her own filmmaking proclivities.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Andrew Schenker
    It gives a true sense of how the forces of a hypocritically religious country has burdened countless young women with a lifetime of misplaced guilt.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Andrew Schenker
    Proves how invigorating genre filmmaking can be in the hands of a savvy, perpetually inventive director.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Andrew Schenker
    The film proves that neither gross-out gags nor pseudo-sophisticated Woody Allenisms are necessary to make a smart, funny comedy.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Andrew Schenker
    There's no coddling the audience in Vibeke Løkkeberg's verité heave of disgust as the full consequences on the Palestinian people of Operation Cast Lead are made sickeningly clear.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 75 Andrew Schenker
    Lynn Shelton crafts a film of astonishingly sustained mood, tying its beguiling atmosphere to the mental states of her characters.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Andrew Schenker
    James Marsh carries forward the mood and menace of the opening into the balance of the work, perfectly matching his aesthetic strategies to the story's shifting moral terrain.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Andrew Schenker
    It not only makes for riveting cinematic drama (all the more impressive given that it relies so heavily on recounted words rather than illustrated actions), but for first-rate muckraking.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Andrew Schenker
    A study of the this former mining region in both its de-industralized present and its past state as an active coalfield, The Miners' Hymns arranges its two parts as a set of binary oppositions.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Andrew Schenker
    A slick, entertaining offering, playing at times like a tarted up "E! True Hollywood Story."
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Andrew Schenker
    Tsui Hark's film is the veteran director's chance to let his imagination run riot in the context of a high-budget, 3D IMAX production.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 75 Andrew Schenker
    Everado González isn't above capturing some striking landscape shots, seemingly for the shear desolate prettiness of it, but they always double as a reminder of the very real plight facing the subjects.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Andrew Schenker
    The film, lensed in appealing candy-striped colors, has so much fun exploding stereotypes and radiates with such infectious comic gusto and genuine good nature, that it would be almost churlish to resist its charms.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew Schenker
    The film never lingers too long on any one thing, instead functioning as a survey in which several fascinating cultural moments are vividly evoked, but then left insufficiently probed.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    Much of the film's final act is given to alienated walking, which too often plays as an abstract study of triangular arrangements in which non-speaking figures move across a barren terrain.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    With the film, Melissa McCarthy definitively cements her status as a legitimate comic talent, leaving her co-star stumbling behind in her wake.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    Even as an "18 months later" epilogue ensures us that everything's hunky dory, this is one surprisingly grim celebration of a group Rapaport obviously loves.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    Dreams of a Life succeeds in making its point about the unkowability of the people in our lives, but there isn't quite enough substance here to fully sustain the film.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    Given the film's early promise, it's unfortunate how it turns into a largely reductive Freudian character piece in which the main character has to come to terms with his old man.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    One Day conveys a real sense of the poignancy of individual lives unfolding over time, but the film's ultimate embrace of conventionality ultimately undercuts the not inconsiderable accomplishments the project had worked so hard to achieve.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    The title of Susan Froemke's documentary is both an expression of aspiration and a statement of achievement.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    Oliver Laxe goes full-on meta by casting himself in the role of a visiting moviemaker who travels to Morocco to shoot footage with disadvantaged children living in a shelter.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    As in Tizza Covi and Rainer Frimmel's 2009 film, La Pivellina, modesty is the key to The Shine of Day, and sometimes to the detriment of audience involvement and focus.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    It too often feels like just one more aesthetically uninspired documentary that gives way in the end to a special round of pleading for its specific cause.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    It's occasionally too icily removed, but it compensates through its perpetual concern with understanding its characters and their untenable situations.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    This decision to avoid treating the dinosaurs as surrogate people for easy identification is both the film's boldest move and the source of much of its problems.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    The slightly dour tone is the perfect backdrop for the director to skillfully weave together his varied narrative strands in a surprisingly entertaining medley.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    A little too deliberately balanced in its depiction of its three leads, but it largely makes up the difference with its informed grounding in the economic and social terrain of contemporary France.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    This is one vampire film whose sexless, generic ending betrays a promise of revisionist complexity.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    The surest sign that a filmmaker recognizes the insularity of his or her project is the presence of perfunctory attempts to hint at a wider political context.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    Expressionistic rather than analytical, Passione, John Turturro's cinematic ode to the music of Naples, Italy, unfolds as a compendium of tuneful performances bracketed with the barest of contextualization.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    As far as films about couples dealing with the female partner losing her mind go, Still Mine is pretty pedestrian.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    Chockfull of ideas in a way that's both scattershot and more than a little exciting.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    Nothing here is wrong, but beyond pointing out that sexually charged teenage girls are likely to be misunderstood in an oppressive small town, there's nothing that's especially insightful here either.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    Even as it takes pleasure in imagining the wheeling and dealing that politicos make when no one is looking, it never offers as much insight into the process by which a president is made as its premise would seem to promise.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    The movie's understanding of how the group taps into people's deep need to believe ensures that the film remains not only fair-minded, but sensitive to the tortured emotions of its conflicted central characters.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    The film works best when it focuses viewer attention most acutely on the story, deflecting it away from the director's manipulations.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    Mozart's Sister is too often just one more rehashing of the "Aw, didn't women have it tough then" thematic that never forces the viewer to acknowledge that maybe they haven't got it as great as we'd like to think today.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    The astonishing footage of apes in their natural environment is made perfectly accessible and then nearly undone by a narration track that plays to the audience's basest desires for gag-inducing cuteness.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    If this oddly delineated narrative often falls between two stools, then the replacement of brightly bombastic opera battles with dimly lit, more conventional action sequences is a similarly unwelcome development.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    The film contains far more passion and a tad more complexity than the dominant and typically more staid model of middlebrow costume drama.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    Nanni Moretti's latest is a mixed bag that too often settles for easy, superficial laughs.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    A nose-to-the-ground crime thriller that also doubles as a wide-ranging portrait of official corruption in the Philippines, On the Job has little trouble delivering the genre goods.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    What Puiu seems to be suggesting is that the complexities of human behavior and relationships are beyond the power of the law to comprehend, but are they also beyond the power of the cinema?
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    The film too often undercuts its goals by indulging its director's need for self-affirmation at the expense of the movie's far more compelling central subject.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    A not insignificant act of oral history, Gabor Kalman's There Was Once… makes for considerably less compelling cinema whenever it turns its focus away from the talking-head testimony of the Holocaust survivors of Kalosca, Hungary.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    As director Liza Johnson understands, simply being over there changes someone, no matter if anything unusually traumatic happened to the person.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    Peter Ho-Sun Chan and Deonnie Yen Chan are too resourceful to let things remain dull for long.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    Haney's movie is not great cinema, nor was meant to be, but as an introduction to one of the myriad dangers threatening our earth, it serves its cause well enough. And that, after all, is the whole point.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    The film's inquiry into the artistic method remains somewhat at the superficial level, but the directors do a fine job of emphasizing both the circumstances that lead to the music's creation and the satisfying result of the irrepressible sounds.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    In its refusal to bring an easy understanding to its main character's behavior, it comes dangerously close to presenting her as a willing perpetrator in her own victimhood.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The film is far too indulgent with its lead character to do more than hint at the ways that one form of male egotism can morph into another.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The movie aims for an admirable balance, but fatally upsets that equilibrium in its hurried resolutions.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    This schizophrenic conception of Gosling's character is indicative of the film's largely dichotomous view of romantic relationships.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    What saves the film from being simply a schematic mother-daughter reconciliation drama is both the reluctance and prickliness that Catherine Keener brings to her character.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Boy
    Less concerned with rendering the specifics of its setting (a small Maori town on the New Zealand coast) than in calling on bouts of whimsy and superficial cultural signifiers to approximate the headspace of its central characters.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The Rum Diary, Bruce Robinson's amorphous hodgepodge of a film, wants to be many things: period recreation, social commentary, morality play, romance, an insider look at the newspaper game.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The film wisely avoids giving its material a large-scale epic quality it can't sustain, but it also results in a project that lacks the complexity to register as more than a handsome little sketch.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Jason Moore's film is more or less successful in inverse proportion to the degree that it plays its material by the book.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Joseph Cedar's Footnote is a sour, rather unpleasant affair that hinges on acts of Jews behaving badly.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The relationship between the two leads neither deteriorates nor seriously improves and last-minute romantic developments don't so much as give shape to the narrative as play as perfunctory gestures of closure.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The film rarely takes us past its rather obvious conclusions about the potential bestial nature of kids and how that may translate to the larger battlefields.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The first four of the film's 1980s-set episodes are shorter in length and more anecdotal in nature than the last two and deal primarily with the pageantry and inflexible customs behind the regime with a perspective at once amused and bemused.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The film is less corporate parable than intricately crafted revenge drama whose intensively detailed plotting can't hide the fact that the whole thing seems like a lot of work for a glaringly modest payoff.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Offers up little more than a tired morality play about the dangers of power, rehashing stale insights about the narcissism of the documentary impulse.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    This twist-heavy World War II drama would play as an absurdist comedy if the director wasn't so dead set on excluding just about any trace of humor from his self-serious project.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Allen Hughes may suggest an air of pretty menace, but he does little to make the sequence work as a legible genre scene.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Much of the film's attempted laughs come from the comedy-of-discomfort school, with an endless array of situations that milk awkwardness to a degree that makes these scenes far more unpleasant than humorous to watch.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    It's all very tastefully handled by Ben Sombogaart, shot in plenty of staid compositions whose denuded color scheme suggests a historical remove, but it rarely generates any heat, even during a pair of graphic, but not particularly erotic sex scenes.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Steve Coogan and Rob Brydon's shtick - a relentless verbal sparring comprised of dueling impressions, poetry recitations, absurdist riffing, and comic one-upmanship - works best in small doses.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    To drive home the pathos of Nim's mistreatment, James Marsh frequently makes questionable use of the creature's apparent similarity to human beings, trading complex analysis for easy sentiment.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Walks a fine line between empathetic treatment of its characters and voyeuristic freakshow gazing.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Battle for Brooklyn brings up larger quandaries about urban development which it doesn't begin to address.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Ralph Fiennes's film feels not so much rooted in the past as it is mired in conventions about how to portray that past.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    For all the revelations about the way the rich operate, there's little juicy pleasure to be had in the proceedings.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Joan aside, the film goes down easy enough.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Essentially the film aims to trade in the awkwardness of teen sexuality, but too often settles for the gross-out gag instead.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The film scores all of its thematic points early, commenting intriguingly, if ultimately rather obviously, on the demands of Japanese patriarchy.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Suffers from both an odd, ineffective structure and a low-key tone that jars uncomfortably with the subject matter and makes the film's stakes seem unnecessary low.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Of the film's three principals, it's only teenage Michael--more than ably embodied by screen newcomer Harmony Santana--that writer-director Rashaad Ernesto Green seems to have much of a feel for.

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