Andrew Schenker
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For 195 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 21% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 75% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Andrew Schenker's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 50
Highest review score: 100 The Turin Horse
Lowest review score: 0 Act of Valor
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 71 out of 195
  2. Negative: 62 out of 195
195 movie reviews
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The film scores all of its thematic points early, commenting intriguingly, if ultimately rather obviously, on the demands of Japanese patriarchy.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Ralph Fiennes's film feels not so much rooted in the past as it is mired in conventions about how to portray that past.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The film smartly avoids the sort of cynical hijinks that characterize the majority of Vegas-set flicks, though it can't come up with anything more compelling to place in its stead.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    The modern-day sections with Mariel Hemingway, while detailing the redemptive promise of the title, too often come across as either indulgent time-filler or overflow with PSA-level superficiality.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Andrew Schenker
    Alternating between self-consciously offbeat comedy and existential J-horror, It's Me, It's Me never quite satisfies in either mode.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Schenker
    Even as Deb comes to embrace the vibrancy of urban life, she's still prey to a blinkered suburban viewpoint which becomes inscribed in the film itself.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Schenker
    Enjoyment of Jeff Kaplan's film will vary given your capacity to simultaneously laugh and wink at the hijinks of two of the least palatable characters to share screen time in recent years.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Andrew Schenker
    When Diana's fixations begin to take over, Fidell seems ill-prepared to steer the film into strictly psychological territory, resulting in a project that loses its fraught sense of control at the same moment as its embattled protagonist.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Life lessons abound in Buck, most of them tied to endlessly reiterated comparisons between man and horse.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Sarah's Key becomes a musing ("meditation" would be too generous) on the importance of uncovering the past that fails to honestly contemplate why such an act is significant.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    For a film that had once made some pretense toward exposing such dangerously submissive attitudes toward Hollywood romance, Friends with Benefits's conclusion can't help but seem more than a wee bit disingenuous.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Of all the vaguely philosophical, calculatedly left-of-center dialogue that peppers Miranda July's The Future, no line is more telling than the writer/director/star's late-film declaration, in the guise of her character Sophie, that "I'm saying okay to nothing."
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Francesca Gregorini and Tatiana von Furstenberg's film is episodic, but the episodes don't achieve any kind of cumulative effect.
    • 6 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Played as broadly and as crudely as you please (in terms of acting, direction, "edgy" dialogue), Prince of Swine paints a grimly ugly portrait of male sexual violence and female submission.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Naturally, given the film's somewhat precious air of spiritualism, the parroted phrase that speaks most clearly to Lyman is a quotation from the book of Ecclesiastes that gives the film its title and gives Fiona a chance to offer a blithely optimistic interpretation of that most dour of Biblical books.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    The film is so careful to avoid the luridness that would seem inevitably to accompany an excavation of child kidnapping, forced labor, and rape, that the result is a plodding, overly tasteful procedural that holds up its hero as an incorruptible embodiment of goodness.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    What unfolds is a predictably anguished story of true love thwarted by material circumstances, or in the terms dictated by the film, rationality triumphing over romance.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Like most of the film's performances, Sisley's comes off as flat and impenetrable, the result both of a certain stoical conception of character and the dissipation of focus that arises from the movie's perceived need to encompass so much.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    When does intensity and commitment supersede historical understanding?
    • 82 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Nuri Bilge Ceylan has to be the least kinetic of working filmmakers - and not simply in the sense of static camerawork or lack of narrative momentum.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    The first half of the film is a virtual compendium of high-culture references, topical concerns addressed almost in passing, and narrative fracturing devices.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    A (relatively) tasteful and restrained approach to potentially lurid subject matter isn't necessarily any better than one that gives in freely to what might be seen as a filmmaker's baser impulses.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Gentler and less aesthetically assaultive than offerings like 0s & 1s and Catfish, but it's not necessarily any subtler or more enlightening.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Debbie Goodstein-Rosenfeld's film seems oddly anemic when it deals with anyone but Chazz Palminteri's Joe.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Far more concerned with indulging a slightly less glossy Slumdog Millionaire-like aesthetic than dealing with the frayed relationships of its characters.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    A predictable, drawn-out romantic comedy that happens to be set in the shadow of impending apocalypse.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    What's perhaps most off-putting about the movie isn't its increasingly stale humor, but the way it ultimately validates its characters' worst impulses.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Shifting between wacky situation comedy and somber familial drama, Why Stop Now? isn't invested enough in either mode to convincingly pull off its genre-hopping ambitions.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    While the heart of the movie is the at-times strained relationship between the two leads, it all unfolds rather by the numbers, dictated more by the expected arc of such things than the demands of the characters.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 38 Andrew Schenker
    Director Erik Canuel fails to deliver us from the inevitable hermeticism of the material.

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