Andrew Schenker
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For 194 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 21% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 75% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.7 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Andrew Schenker's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 50
Highest review score: 100 Stray Dogs
Lowest review score: 0 Act of Valor
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 70 out of 194
  2. Negative: 62 out of 194
194 movie reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Andrew Schenker
    The film never lingers too long on any one thing, instead functioning as a survey in which several fascinating cultural moments are vividly evoked, but then left insufficiently probed.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    Haney's movie is not great cinema, nor was meant to be, but as an introduction to one of the myriad dangers threatening our earth, it serves its cause well enough. And that, after all, is the whole point.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    Expressionistic rather than analytical, Passione, John Turturro's cinematic ode to the music of Naples, Italy, unfolds as a compendium of tuneful performances bracketed with the barest of contextualization.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    Chockfull of ideas in a way that's both scattershot and more than a little exciting.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    What Puiu seems to be suggesting is that the complexities of human behavior and relationships are beyond the power of the law to comprehend, but are they also beyond the power of the cinema?
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    Even as an "18 months later" epilogue ensures us that everything's hunky dory, this is one surprisingly grim celebration of a group Rapaport obviously loves.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    One Day conveys a real sense of the poignancy of individual lives unfolding over time, but the film's ultimate embrace of conventionality ultimately undercuts the not inconsiderable accomplishments the project had worked so hard to achieve.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    Mozart's Sister is too often just one more rehashing of the "Aw, didn't women have it tough then" thematic that never forces the viewer to acknowledge that maybe they haven't got it as great as we'd like to think today.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    If this oddly delineated narrative often falls between two stools, then the replacement of brightly bombastic opera battles with dimly lit, more conventional action sequences is a similarly unwelcome development.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    A not insignificant act of oral history, Gabor Kalman's There Was Onceā€¦ makes for considerably less compelling cinema whenever it turns its focus away from the talking-head testimony of the Holocaust survivors of Kalosca, Hungary.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    The film's inquiry into the artistic method remains somewhat at the superficial level, but the directors do a fine job of emphasizing both the circumstances that lead to the music's creation and the satisfying result of the irrepressible sounds.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    Oliver Laxe goes full-on meta by casting himself in the role of a visiting moviemaker who travels to Morocco to shoot footage with disadvantaged children living in a shelter.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    Even as it takes pleasure in imagining the wheeling and dealing that politicos make when no one is looking, it never offers as much insight into the process by which a president is made as its premise would seem to promise.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    The surest sign that a filmmaker recognizes the insularity of his or her project is the presence of perfunctory attempts to hint at a wider political context.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    As director Liza Johnson understands, simply being over there changes someone, no matter if anything unusually traumatic happened to the person.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    Nothing here is wrong, but beyond pointing out that sexually charged teenage girls are likely to be misunderstood in an oppressive small town, there's nothing that's especially insightful here either.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    Nanni Moretti's latest is a mixed bag that too often settles for easy, superficial laughs.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    This is one vampire film whose sexless, generic ending betrays a promise of revisionist complexity.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    The astonishing footage of apes in their natural environment is made perfectly accessible and then nearly undone by a narration track that plays to the audience's basest desires for gag-inducing cuteness.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    The film too often undercuts its goals by indulging its director's need for self-affirmation at the expense of the movie's far more compelling central subject.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    The title of Susan Froemke's documentary is both an expression of aspiration and a statement of achievement.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    Dreams of a Life succeeds in making its point about the unkowability of the people in our lives, but there isn't quite enough substance here to fully sustain the film.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    Much of the film's final act is given to alienated walking, which too often plays as an abstract study of triangular arrangements in which non-speaking figures move across a barren terrain.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    The film contains far more passion and a tad more complexity than the dominant and typically more staid model of middlebrow costume drama.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    Peter Ho-Sun Chan and Deonnie Yen Chan are too resourceful to let things remain dull for long.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    The slightly dour tone is the perfect backdrop for the director to skillfully weave together his varied narrative strands in a surprisingly entertaining medley.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    It too often feels like just one more aesthetically uninspired documentary that gives way in the end to a special round of pleading for its specific cause.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    The film works best when it focuses viewer attention most acutely on the story, deflecting it away from the director's manipulations.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    A little too deliberately balanced in its depiction of its three leads, but it largely makes up the difference with its informed grounding in the economic and social terrain of contemporary France.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Andrew Schenker
    With the film, Melissa McCarthy definitively cements her status as a legitimate comic talent, leaving her co-star stumbling behind in her wake.