For 100 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 54% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 39% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Andy Webster's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 Valentino's Ghost
Lowest review score: 0 A Haunted House 2
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 36 out of 100
  2. Negative: 16 out of 100
100 movie reviews
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Andy Webster
    You may not agree with every observation in Michael Singh’s documentary Valentino’s Ghost. But this engrossing examination of American perceptions of Arabs and the Arab world gets you thinking.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Andy Webster
    A record of a man’s tormented youth, his broad artistic impulses and the price he paid for following them.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 90 Andy Webster
    This film — the second from the Soskas, and shot in their hometown, Vancouver, British Columbia — combines gore, quiet dread, feminist conviction and a visual classicism, often using a red palette, with impressive, unbelabored dexterity.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 90 Andy Webster
    The variety of physical perspectives lends a vivid you-are-there aspect to this record of the Zuccotti Park protest in New York in 2011.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Andy Webster
    The movie revels in multiple film stocks (with hairs or threads often on the camera lens) and self-conscious “Last Movie” flourishes (long intervals between credits, “scene missing” title cards, a version of “Me and Bobby McGee”) while maintaining its blithe humor.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    Like many tragic visionaries, Kirk Hanna lives on through his ideas long after his death.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    This winning movie — directed by Daniel Ribeiro, making his feature debut — dexterously weaves the social challenges of adolescence into a story of broader self-discovery.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    The luminaries in “21” pay deserving tribute to Mr. Linklater. Soon, perhaps, so will the Academy
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    Ms. Turner captures the intimacy of solemn, heartfelt moments, and salutes a man who honors their value.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    In its allegiance to detail, the film is too long and perhaps overstates its case in claiming that later generations have lost an understanding of common courage, as depicted by these two artists. Their work endures, and so does what they stood for.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    This candy-coated confection is so irresistible that you’re captivated by its sentiment even as you acknowledge its manipulations.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    The enchantment is irresistible in Judd Ehrlich’s documentary Magic Camp, a spry and revealing examination of Tannen’s Magic Camp.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    While Faults glances at the narcissism of cult leaders, its most penetrating investigation is into the root emptiness within disciples, the desperate hunger to relinquish personal initiative.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    A skilled portrait of a literary light shadowed by his public profile. The film, written and directed by Tom Bean and Luke Poling, tacitly suggests a reconsideration of its subject, who deserves it.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Predictably, the film culminates in a dance competition, irresistible to behold and leading to an ending just about too pat to believe.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Revelations unfold predictably, but the subplots cohere and the assured pacing offers a stark contrast with the often disjointed tempos of Mr. Perry’s mosaics.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Just keep your eyes on the old folks; they are where the heart — and the sweet soul music — of this movie lies.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Much of this movie is composed of survivors who give harrowing accounts of their experiences, and their warnings about rising ethnic hatred in Europe should not be ignored. But those seeking to learn in depth about, say, the dialects and traditions of the Roma should look elsewhere.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    While the director, Peter Askin, employs an all-too-customary suspense arsenal (vertiginous stairway perspectives, foreboding thunderstorms, ominous headlights), Mr. King’s script offers a wealth of behavioral details.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    It’s Arhoolie’s musicians — Big Mama Thornton, Flaco Jiménez, Michael Doucet of the Cajun band BeauSoleil and others — who are the true stars. I dare you not to tap your feet.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    No one is as intriguing as the thoughtful, soft-spoken Mr. Fanning, a onetime idealist thwarted by the piracy label and the dated assumptions of a calcified communications infrastructure.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Chavez (1927-1993), a founder of what became the United Farm Workers union, faced brutal odds, as this compelling documentary demonstrates.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    An enlightening documentary.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    There is nothing remotely salacious about Bitter Honey, an agonizing documentary examination of polygamy in Bali, Indonesia, from the U.C.L.A. anthropologist Robert Lemelson. There is only vivid evidence of a society that, despite limp efforts at discouraging domestic abuse, remains mired in ancient patriarchy, sanctioning polygamy and, implicitly, often attendant violence.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    It taps into something universal, and very precious, about loss, art and adolescent rebellion.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Mr. Holsten, was a maker of the winning 2012 documentary “OC87,” a study of obsessive-compulsive disorder. His gift for portraiture shows only further refinement here.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    What distinguishes Fonzy is its attention to Diego’s Galician roots. As his character discovers his offspring and his paternal instinct, Mr. Garcia gives the bedraggled but compassionate Diego an aspect slightly more emphatic than his screen forebears.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Mr. Liford (yet another emergent indie filmmaker from Texas) can clearly write a script, handle a camera and construct a mood. Wuss may be slight, but Mr. Liford’s sense of pitch is spot on.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Shah Rukh Khan’s seasoned authority is a steady anchor amid the frantic contrivances.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    With strong assists from the cinematographer Zachary Galler and her ex-husband, the composer Sondre Lerche, Ms. Fastvold, previously a director of music videos, has painted a resonant tableau of dysfunction.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    The movie, directed by Jaume Collet-Serra, who directed Mr. Neeson in the efficient airborne thriller “Non-Stop,” has two saving graces: a tight script and terrific acting.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Mr. Romero, manifesting a self-effacing demeanor and sensible humanity, is a most agreeable raconteur.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    The story may be slight, but the performances and ambience resonate.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Since we can’t all attend Burning Man, we can be thankful for “Spark,” which is probably the next best thing.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    [A] short but bluntly powerful documentary.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    In her pursuit, Shivani pistol-whips perps, performs a flying tackle on a criminal astride a motorcycle, shoots an assassin at point-blank range and stabs an assailant through the hand. Her final confrontation with Walt is a sweaty aria of hand-to-hand martial arts combat.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    It’s not the derivative scares and rudimentary effects that keep this low-budget effort percolating but the improvisational energy of Mr. Santos and Mr. Villarreal, whose ease, chemistry and humor never flag.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    At length, the cheerleading...becomes a mildly taxing torrent. And Mr. Struzan, while an agreeable presence, is not an especially engrossing speaker. But then there is his artwork, an essential aid to the movies — and often their superior.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    Best of all, Mr. Law doesn’t skimp on wide-screen compositions; this is one movie designed for the theater, not the couch.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    This record of Washington State’s battle over Initiative 502, which legalized possession of small amounts of recreational marijuana in 2012, is predictably loaded with rancor. The battle isn’t over whether pot should be legalized, but to what extent.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    [A] tidy and ingratiating documentary ode to high-end mixologists.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    At 137 minutes, the film overstays its welcome with multiple concluding flourishes (and exceeds the sentiment threshold).
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    [A] slight exercise, which, for all its modesty, generates a measure of dread.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    Anne Hathaway made a splash in Disney’s “The Princess Diaries,” and the rangy Ms. Kapoor (who descends from a Bollywood dynasty) shares some of her early incandescence, along with a Julia Roberts-like smile.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    The ending to this fable misses the opportunity for broader metaphorical resonance, but getting there has its own unnerving rewards.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    Almost every image in this movie — from webcams, websites and laptop cameras — appears on a monitor. Scenes pulse with the Internet’s speed and sprawl, aided by clever editing that pops. The effect is insular, off-putting and disconcertingly familiar.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    Narrative depth may be in short supply, but the energy, invention and humor are bracing.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    The film may leave you hungry for deeper insight into some its most renowned purveyors.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    The actors are uniformly impressive, and Mr. Wheatley’s longtime cinematographer, Laurie Rose, shooting in black and white, combines stunning pastoral compositions with bursts of graphic violence punctuated by blazing flintlocks.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    Mr. Payet, who is one of the film’s directors and screenwriters, is a comedy star in France, and this movie is facile with its comic rhythms and dramatic flow.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    There’s much sympathy but little tension in P J Raval’s new documentary.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    This isn’t activism; it’s by-the-numbers suspense.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    This frenetic movie has moments of wit, and Ms. Feiffer, a seasoned screen and Broadway performer, has range, stamina and charisma.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    Mr. Hough, a “Dancing With the Stars” champion, impresses with his footwork and sufficiently fulfills his romantic-lead duties. BoA is cute and appealingly impudent, but a bit more remote. On the floor, however, their chemistry ignites.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    An intermittently diverting stew of low-budget effects and potty-mouth humor.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    Kabbalah Me, which distinguishes between “narrow consciousness” and “expanded consciousness,” merely walks the middle ground.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    The directors, Dallas Hallam and Patrick Horvath, are fluent in the genre’s staples (creaky interiors, slamming doors, yada yada yada), lighting schemes and startling edits. And they draw decent work from their actors, who commit to the wispy, subtext-free material.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    The film’s director, Liz Tuccillo — a former writer for “Sex and the City,” an author of “He’s Just Not That Into You” and now developing a sitcom for Lauren Graham — is predictably facile with comic rhythms, though her dialogue tilts toward the glib, and her characterizations toward the familiar.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    A movie of modest means that nevertheless offers a fairly cohesive story and at least one standout performance. It may underplay an idea laden with potential, but at least that notion is present.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    For all its gloss, “Kundo” fails to resonate. You appreciate the execution, but the film is hindered by its lack of novelty and metaphorical weight.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    Mr. Garlin has such a soft touch that at times the film feels feather-light, almost devoid of emotional traction.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    This tale of a yuppie couple (played by Ayushmann Khurrana and Sonam Kapoor) flirts with intriguing notions of recessionary struggle, though strained, contrived humor bogs it down.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    Desert Dancer explores fascinating aspects of present-day Iran but suffers mightily from simplistic and sentimental tendencies.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    “Sea of Monsters” is diverting enough...but it doesn’t begin to approach the biting adolescent tension of the Harry Potter movies.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    It is Ms. McAllister who is the brightest light amid the talky, often sentimental exchanges. She lends charm and conviction to a character who might otherwise have proved insufferable.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    Mr. D'Souza stumbles when interviewing George Obama, the president's half-brother, an activist who voluntarily lives amid squalor in Nairobi, Kenya. "Obama has not done anything to help you," Mr. D'Souza says. "He's taking care of me; I'm part of the world," George Obama replies.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    Mostly, Last Weekend is an elegiac ode to affluence.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    Despite its sense of mission, the film suffers from soapy excesses and narrative disjunctures.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    24 Exposures plays like an exercise. With a thin plot — the usual parade of possible killers — it falls to the actors to provide zing.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    It’s all very solemn, convoluted and a bit bloody, but not engrossing, despite impressive cinematography by Jasmin Kuhn and Mr. dela Torre and the best efforts of a hard-working cast.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    It’s all high-end flash, but less romantic than wearying.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    A modest effort only fitfully attaining its aims.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    Deficient even in most of its set pieces, In the Blood does Ms. Carano (and Caribbean tourism) few favors. Somebody, please give her a better script and director.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    The film is about exotic locations (including a volcano), garish humor (often at the expense of Mr. Chan or women), fisticuffs, stunts and frenetic visual bombast.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    For all its spectacle, The Fatal Encounter is wanting for profundity.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    Tai Chi Hero merely fills the eye, offering little that stays with you.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    The conventions are trundled out in Stanley J. Orzel’s cross-cultural romance, Lost for Words, but not the tension or the chemistry.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    [A] glossy, fawning valentine to conspicuous consumption.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    What Lotus Eaters can take pride in are Gareth Munden’s stunning black-and-white cinematography and Ms. Campbell-Hughes, a riveting visual subject suggesting miles of internal depth. She makes this wallow in callow company watchable.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    Although the subject is potent, the film, directed with a seemingly effortless commercial acumen, doesn’t burrow deeply.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    While this unrelentingly midtempo movie milks Brooklyn for its chic, it manages to denude it of its color.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    The emotional dynamics in domestic violence, for the abuser and the abused, are often too disturbing and complex to be treated as superficially as The Living does.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    A “EuroTrip” with balance sheets, the slick, innocuous comedy Unfinished Business fails to seal the deal.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    Underlying this overlong and overheated enterprise is a surfeit of ambition. Maybe too much.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    The Rambler...feels like a slender plot with additional scenes pasted on.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    [A] disposable comedy.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    The horror anthology has a long tradition, going at least as far back as the British classic “Dead of Night,” in 1945. The best offer surprise endings or a sense of humor. You won’t receive much of either here. Just vertigo and maybe a wicked case of induced attention deficit disorder.
    • 11 Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    Marlon Wayans’s satire “A Haunted House” got to “Paranormal” first, and for a much smaller budget delivered bigger laughs.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    Limp pacing and countless shots of Washington’s skyline plague the narrative. Ms. Smollett-Bell exudes an earthy appeal, but it’s the charismatic Mr. Jones who steals the picture. Given all the stifling preachiness, that’s to be expected.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    The film, financed by a Kickstarter campaign, looks polished enough. But its investors’ money might have been better spent elsewhere.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    This belabored comedy, directed by Benjamin Epps, has a slick visual veneer and some capable performances, especially by Ms. Rulin and Ms. King. But the script, by Matt K. Turner, is loaded with contradictions, its hollow flirtation with subversion amount to airplane pablum.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    Feels like a religious tract more than a movie.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    The sophomoric humor may be absent, but in its place is only a soufflé of whimsy, seasoned with soot, that fails to rise.
    • 12 Metascore
    • 20 Andy Webster
    The familiar special effects are not the most disappointing element here. It’s the squandering of the talented Ms. Heche, who is given top billing but almost nothing to do.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 20 Andy Webster
    An entwined triptych of sorts unified by invective, slurs and characters demanding that others shut up, Run It is a very patchy affair.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 20 Andy Webster
    A spare trifle carried largely by its leading actress.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 20 Andy Webster
    This is pap, plain and simple: scattered raunch-lite devoid of emotional resonance. At best, it sells itself on the spectacle of a TV show’s cast reunion — and even then it disappoints.
    • 13 Metascore
    • 20 Andy Webster
    You won’t find much offensive in Kevin James’s slick, innocuous vehicle Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2. You won’t find much prompting an emotional reaction in general, so familiar are the jokes and situations. If Mr. James’s character thinks of safety first, so does this movie, to its extreme detriment.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 10 Andy Webster
    The humor, when it isn’t overcooked, can be downright insulting or worse.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 0 Andy Webster
    Already the franchise displays a sputtering exhaustion.

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