For 222 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 53% higher than the average critic
  • 9% same as the average critic
  • 38% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.6 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Andy Webster's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 58
Highest review score: 100 A Sinner in Mecca
Lowest review score: 0 A Haunted House 2
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 93 out of 222
  2. Negative: 29 out of 222
222 movie reviews
    • 68 Metascore
    • 100 Andy Webster
    Mr. Sharma has created a swirling, fascinating travelogue and a stirring celebration of devotion.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Andy Webster
    You may not agree with every observation in Michael Singh’s documentary Valentino’s Ghost. But this engrossing examination of American perceptions of Arabs and the Arab world gets you thinking.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 90 Andy Webster
    It takes Sean Ellis’s World War II thriller Anthropoid a while to build steam, but once it does, hang on.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 90 Andy Webster
    A richly satisfying poison-pen letter to the music industry.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 90 Andy Webster
    [A] fascinating and assured documentary.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Andy Webster
    Breezy, intelligent, diffuse but uncluttered, Fredrik Gertten’s documentary Bikes vs Cars could be called a tale of congestion-plagued cities.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Andy Webster
    A record of a man’s tormented youth, his broad artistic impulses and the price he paid for following them.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 90 Andy Webster
    This film — the second from the Soskas, and shot in their hometown, Vancouver, British Columbia — combines gore, quiet dread, feminist conviction and a visual classicism, often using a red palette, with impressive, unbelabored dexterity.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Andy Webster
    The ideas in this densely packed but enlightening film can be challenging, but must be heard.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 90 Andy Webster
    The variety of physical perspectives lends a vivid you-are-there aspect to this record of the Zuccotti Park protest in New York in 2011.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Andy Webster
    Trapped is not a balanced analysis of the abortion debate; it makes its sympathies clear. But it is a powerful and persuasive rendering of a corner of women’s health care under siege.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Andy Webster
    [A] fascinating documentary.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Andy Webster
    Quiet, graceful, stately and infused with slow tension, Dana Rotberg’s White Lies unfolds with inexorable weight.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 90 Andy Webster
    This is a movie that drops quotations from Faulkner and Einstein, but it rarely feels pedantic or platitudinous, thanks to the breezy, assured delivery of Mr. Khan.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 Andy Webster
    The movie revels in multiple film stocks (with hairs or threads often on the camera lens) and self-conscious “Last Movie” flourishes (long intervals between credits, “scene missing” title cards, a version of “Me and Bobby McGee”) while maintaining its blithe humor.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 90 Andy Webster
    German Kral’s documentary Our Last Tango is a combination of things, all fascinating.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 Andy Webster
    Many of the passages in this gentle film may be universal, but the love here is extraordinary.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    Ms. Kendrick — whether playing daffy, amorous, insightful or indignant — carries the movie. And her surprising shades of grit don’t hurt, either.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    One notion underlying Shalini Kantayya’s winning documentary, Catching the Sun, is that solar power is not only a cleaner alternative to fossil fuels but can also effectively curtail unemployment.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    A re-creation of the night, with an actress playing the screaming victim while Mr. Genovese observes, is harrowing.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    Like many tragic visionaries, Kirk Hanna lives on through his ideas long after his death.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    This winning movie — directed by Daniel Ribeiro, making his feature debut — dexterously weaves the social challenges of adolescence into a story of broader self-discovery.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    The luminaries in “21” pay deserving tribute to Mr. Linklater. Soon, perhaps, so will the Academy
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    Ms. Turner captures the intimacy of solemn, heartfelt moments, and salutes a man who honors their value.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    There are heroic adults here.... There is also deft editing, artful camerawork and effective music in abundance.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    Given [Ms. Cohn] confident hand behind the camera and gift for rich female characters, you hope to see more portraits from her in the future.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    In Antonio Banderas, Mr. Hudson has a winning de Sautuola of personal modesty, scientific integrity and paternal warmth.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    In its allegiance to detail, the film is too long and perhaps overstates its case in claiming that later generations have lost an understanding of common courage, as depicted by these two artists. Their work endures, and so does what they stood for.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    Fascinating.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    Ms. Shaye gives Insidious more than sufficient reason for a Chapter 4.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    Onni Tommila, Mr. Helander’s nephew, has an expressive face and marvelous understatement. And Mr. Jackson has never seemed so unblustery; his scenes with the younger actor have ease and humor.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    The American demand for drugs, which feeds the cartels, is mentioned, though regrettably not expanded upon. But as a rendering of Mexico’s agonized convulsions, Kingdom of Shadows is unforgettable.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    Besides a clever, blithely ribald script by Bradley Jackson, the movie benefits from a potent “Saturday Night Live”-empowered cast.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    It’s often said that the Irish, blessed with the gift of gab, can be splendid raconteurs. You’ll find generous evidence to that effect here. And a bit of poetry as well.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    Len and Company...never strains for profundity. Instead, it savors observational subtleties, especially in Mr. Ifans’s assured performance. For a baby-boomer-meets-millennial family drama, that’s plenty.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    This candy-coated confection is so irresistible that you’re captivated by its sentiment even as you acknowledge its manipulations.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    The enchantment is irresistible in Judd Ehrlich’s documentary Magic Camp, a spry and revealing examination of Tannen’s Magic Camp.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    It’s an eco-fable devoid of didactic overkill, delivered with energy, winking mischief, unobtrusive effects and a skilled cast.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    In marriage and parenthood, one size doesn’t fit all. Marcia’s words at the wedding about surmounting differences speak volumes about love’s adaptability.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    Impressive acting (especially from Mr. Suliman and Yael Abecassis as Yonatan’s mother) enhances this thoughtful drama, directed with a sure hand by Mr. Riklis, a film veteran.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    The film is remarkable, considering its minimal means and surprising lack of bloodshed, given the genre. Does it stay with you? A little.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    You don’t have to be a boxing fan to be awed by Claressa Shields, the first woman to win an Olympic gold medal in the sport. But if you are, you’ll still be knocked out.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    While Faults glances at the narcissism of cult leaders, its most penetrating investigation is into the root emptiness within disciples, the desperate hunger to relinquish personal initiative.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    The pleasures are modest but rewarding in Bob Nelson’s character study The Confirmation.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    Its principal merit is the quiet authority of Ms. Mumtaz, who combines a mother’s passionate concern with glimmers of an awakening consciousness.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    A skilled portrait of a literary light shadowed by his public profile. The film, written and directed by Tom Bean and Luke Poling, tacitly suggests a reconsideration of its subject, who deserves it.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    Rarely has a movie so humorously illustrated the meaning of “frenemy.”
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Andy Webster
    Their stories are compelling — and persuasive.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Mr. Piazza offers a persuasive portrait of decline, but it is the crumbling beauty and flailing hopes of Rose that resonate. Ms. Arquette comprehends the character inside and out, and her aim is true.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    The virtues of understatement and restraint are vividly apparent in Philippe Muyl’s The Nightingale.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    [A] brutally powerful documentary.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    The movie overreaches when trying to contextualize Knievel as a hero inspiring the country after Vietnam-Watergate disillusionment. He was simply an all-American self-promoter. But Being Evel largely nails his story.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Predictably, the film culminates in a dance competition, irresistible to behold and leading to an ending just about too pat to believe.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Revelations unfold predictably, but the subplots cohere and the assured pacing offers a stark contrast with the often disjointed tempos of Mr. Perry’s mosaics.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Karski & the Lords of Humanity is fascinating, but Mr. Lanzmann’s efforts tower over it.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Just keep your eyes on the old folks; they are where the heart — and the sweet soul music — of this movie lies.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    The Vessel is a modest, but not maudlin, parable of hope about mustering the strength to vigorously plunge again into life’s uncertainties after a devastating loss.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Much of this movie is composed of survivors who give harrowing accounts of their experiences, and their warnings about rising ethnic hatred in Europe should not be ignored. But those seeking to learn in depth about, say, the dialects and traditions of the Roma should look elsewhere.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    While the director, Peter Askin, employs an all-too-customary suspense arsenal (vertiginous stairway perspectives, foreboding thunderstorms, ominous headlights), Mr. King’s script offers a wealth of behavioral details.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    It’s Arhoolie’s musicians — Big Mama Thornton, Flaco Jiménez, Michael Doucet of the Cajun band BeauSoleil and others — who are the true stars. I dare you not to tap your feet.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    If there’s one rewarding thing about many Hong Kong action directors, it’s that they rarely dawdle in getting to what fight fans have come for: bracing shootouts and high-impact fisticuffs and footwork.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    No one is as intriguing as the thoughtful, soft-spoken Mr. Fanning, a onetime idealist thwarted by the piracy label and the dated assumptions of a calcified communications infrastructure.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    The filmmakers, largely forgoing a soundtrack, skillfully manipulate stillness, silence and anomie to unsettling effect.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Chavez (1927-1993), a founder of what became the United Farm Workers union, faced brutal odds, as this compelling documentary demonstrates.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Mr. Diez, a former effects specialist, skillfully blends viscous textures with cheesy digital flourishes. The screenwriter, Adam Aresty, also earns points for the dialogue’s blithe hit-or-miss humor. But it’s Tilman Hahn’s sound design, with its unsettling buzz, that will burrow most unforgettably into your memory.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Effective topical entertainment, we are reminded, rarely comes without creative conflict.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    An enlightening documentary.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    [A] deft and comprehensive documentary.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    There is nothing remotely salacious about Bitter Honey, an agonizing documentary examination of polygamy in Bali, Indonesia, from the U.C.L.A. anthropologist Robert Lemelson. There is only vivid evidence of a society that, despite limp efforts at discouraging domestic abuse, remains mired in ancient patriarchy, sanctioning polygamy and, implicitly, often attendant violence.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    It taps into something universal, and very precious, about loss, art and adolescent rebellion.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Despite her script’s omissions...Ms. DuVall juggles the emotional dynamics with fluid editing and light comic touches. The skilled cast members must flesh out their characters, and the unselfconscious Ms. Lynskey, who invites the audience’s mockery and ends up with its sympathy, is the revelation.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Zhou Shen and Liu Lu’s bleak farce Mr. Donkey, adapted from their play, has a sentimental streak, and, as farce can, a tendency to overheat. But beneath its mild staginess and intermittent mania lies a cynical, piercing parable about China’s past and perhaps its present.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Mickey Keating’s horror outing Darling manages to conjure an effectively unsettling miasma.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Mr. Holsten, was a maker of the winning 2012 documentary “OC87,” a study of obsessive-compulsive disorder. His gift for portraiture shows only further refinement here.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Despite an implausible ending devoid of consequence, “Don’t Worry Baby” benefits from tidy editing, cinematography and, most of all, the presence of the seasoned Mr. McDonald and Ms. Balsam. Their nuanced authority — and the vibrant Manhattan backdrop — make the trip worthwhile.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    What distinguishes Fonzy is its attention to Diego’s Galician roots. As his character discovers his offspring and his paternal instinct, Mr. Garcia gives the bedraggled but compassionate Diego an aspect slightly more emphatic than his screen forebears.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Mr. Liford (yet another emergent indie filmmaker from Texas) can clearly write a script, handle a camera and construct a mood. Wuss may be slight, but Mr. Liford’s sense of pitch is spot on.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    A Lego Brickumentary might be a resounding cheer for a brand, but it’s an eye-opener, too.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Shah Rukh Khan’s seasoned authority is a steady anchor amid the frantic contrivances.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Thanks to his editor, Domingo González, Mr. de la Iglesia skillfully keeps these many balls in the air, a palpable affection for his players seeping through.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Toward the end, Mr. Farr employs familiar cinematic sleights of hand, but with a finely calibrated touch.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    “As I AM” rockets through its subject’s life, teeming with testimonials from the superstar producer-D.J.s Mark Ronson and Paul Oakenfold, among many others. And then it ends, leaving you spent. And wistful.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    As Salinger, the formidable Chris Cooper has a brief but masterly turn, sympathetically rendering the writer as a curmudgeon defending his literary offspring.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    With strong assists from the cinematographer Zachary Galler and her ex-husband, the composer Sondre Lerche, Ms. Fastvold, previously a director of music videos, has painted a resonant tableau of dysfunction.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    The movie, directed by Jaume Collet-Serra, who directed Mr. Neeson in the efficient airborne thriller “Non-Stop,” has two saving graces: a tight script and terrific acting.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Mr. Romero, manifesting a self-effacing demeanor and sensible humanity, is a most agreeable raconteur.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    The story may be slight, but the performances and ambience resonate.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Since we can’t all attend Burning Man, we can be thankful for “Spark,” which is probably the next best thing.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    [A] short but bluntly powerful documentary.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Iron Moon has a slowly mounting, but lingering, impact.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    Ms. Hammer’s gauzier sequences notwithstanding, the film’s most commanding image is the housekeeper’s description of the ruthless monasticism Bishop maintained and the compulsive writing she practiced in her studio. Amid excesses and entanglements, that concentration ensured her place in literary history.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    In her pursuit, Shivani pistol-whips perps, performs a flying tackle on a criminal astride a motorcycle, shoots an assassin at point-blank range and stabs an assailant through the hand. Her final confrontation with Walt is a sweaty aria of hand-to-hand martial arts combat.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Andy Webster
    This movie makes you appreciate anew the one-on-one social dimension lost in the music industry’s headlong switch to digital downloads.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    It’s not the derivative scares and rudimentary effects that keep this low-budget effort percolating but the improvisational energy of Mr. Santos and Mr. Villarreal, whose ease, chemistry and humor never flag.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    The diagrammatic script, by Jarret Kerr, has wit but could sometimes use more nuance. But there are tasty performances.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    At length, the cheerleading...becomes a mildly taxing torrent. And Mr. Struzan, while an agreeable presence, is not an especially engrossing speaker. But then there is his artwork, an essential aid to the movies — and often their superior.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    Best of all, Mr. Law doesn’t skimp on wide-screen compositions; this is one movie designed for the theater, not the couch.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    Exuberant, busy and sometimes funny, DreamWorks Animation’s Trolls is determined to amuse.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    [A] crisp if feather-light documentary.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    As directed by Henry Barrial, there is solid ensemble acting, particularly by Mr. Bonilla, who dependably anchors a movie that is almost too busy.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    The script, by Ms. Stephens and Joel Viertel, though lurching at times into overstatement, is enhanced with worthy if fleeting performances from John Cho and Christopher McDonald as Sam’s colleagues. Ray Winstone, as a journalist, effectively melds sleaze and compassion.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    This record of Washington State’s battle over Initiative 502, which legalized possession of small amounts of recreational marijuana in 2012, is predictably loaded with rancor. The battle isn’t over whether pot should be legalized, but to what extent.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    [A] tidy and ingratiating documentary ode to high-end mixologists.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    At 137 minutes, the film overstays its welcome with multiple concluding flourishes (and exceeds the sentiment threshold).
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    Meet the Patels is a tidy, easygoing documentary in which peripheral players prove more intriguing than its central focus.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    To its benefit, it has rich roles for, and splendid performances by, its three principal actresses. To its detriment, their characters are each in their own way pining for the same man, whose simple actions in life seem undeserving of their considerable exertions after his demise.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    [A] slight exercise, which, for all its modesty, generates a measure of dread.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    The Japanese have a term for a certain type of character in manga (comic books) and anime: bishonen — pubescent in appearance, devoid of facial hair, sensitive, unthreatening. That would be Mr. Espinosa.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    Anne Hathaway made a splash in Disney’s “The Princess Diaries,” and the rangy Ms. Kapoor (who descends from a Bollywood dynasty) shares some of her early incandescence, along with a Julia Roberts-like smile.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    This film nimbly straddles biography and “Trek” valentine (Adam is a longtime television director), but also recounts the fraught if ultimately devoted ties between Adam and Leonard.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    Mr. Peng has charisma, though his moves are less convincing than those of an earlier Fei.... But “Legend” does offer the hefty authority of Mr. Hung, who at 64 can still — almost — hit, kick and do wire work with the best of them.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    Mr. Hosoda is skilled with fight scenes, and his settings — the pastel-hued Jutengai and the drab Shibuya, evoked at times with surveillance-camera perspectives and crowd-paranoia angles — are impressive. But the characterizations and conflicts here are strictly generic
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    The pieces don’t entirely cohere, but Ms. Smith has a promising sensibility.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    Mr. Irons handily hits the emotional beats, as does Mr. Patel.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    The ending to this fable misses the opportunity for broader metaphorical resonance, but getting there has its own unnerving rewards.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    Almost every image in this movie — from webcams, websites and laptop cameras — appears on a monitor. Scenes pulse with the Internet’s speed and sprawl, aided by clever editing that pops. The effect is insular, off-putting and disconcertingly familiar.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    Narrative depth may be in short supply, but the energy, invention and humor are bracing.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    Mr. Gilady, a documentarian making his fiction feature debut as a writer and director, over-stacks the deck with this belabored if artfully shot story.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    The movie benefits greatly from Mr. Amoedo’s largely steady direction and the uniform acting skills of its Chilean cast (performing in English).
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    The film may leave you hungry for deeper insight into some its most renowned purveyors.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    Mr. Chi, making his feature debut with Tentacle 8, lavishes attention on his characters at the expense of the through line binding them.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    The actors are uniformly impressive, and Mr. Wheatley’s longtime cinematographer, Laurie Rose, shooting in black and white, combines stunning pastoral compositions with bursts of graphic violence punctuated by blazing flintlocks.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    A savvy exercise in inspirational feel-good cinema lightly seasoned with grit.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    The director, Joey Kuhn, making his feature debut from his own script, has created fairly credible and sympathetic characters, despite the 1-percenter milieu.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    Mr. Payet, who is one of the film’s directors and screenwriters, is a comedy star in France, and this movie is facile with its comic rhythms and dramatic flow.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    There’s much sympathy but little tension in P J Raval’s new documentary.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Andy Webster
    Mr. Wirthensohn, who has known Mr. Reay since both were models, sees Mr. Reay’s life as a metaphor for the vanishing middle class. But Mr. Reay merely comes across as an aging casualty of Manhattan fashion, vainly chasing his fortune in a fickle industry that prizes youth.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    The Boy, despite remarkable performances and gorgeous imagery, does not sufficiently flesh out its subject.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    This isn’t activism; it’s by-the-numbers suspense.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    Only You is served very well by Ms. Tang (a star of Ang Lee’s “Lust, Caution”). Whether playing elated, sorrowful, coy or petulant, she consistently provides the spark the movie could use more of.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    [A] competent but slight thriller.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    Though rich in period detail, the movie grows tiresome with solemn, protracted soap-operatic encounters laden with glowering stares and tearful outbursts.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    This frenetic movie has moments of wit, and Ms. Feiffer, a seasoned screen and Broadway performer, has range, stamina and charisma.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    The movie may suffer from a surfeit of excesses, but it does have arresting, if overwrought, things to say about domestic abuse in India.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    Having painted Victor as a transgressive offender, Mr. Senese backpedals furiously with a coda asserting the potential rewards of genetic manipulation. It isn’t convincing.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    Mr. Hough, a “Dancing With the Stars” champion, impresses with his footwork and sufficiently fulfills his romantic-lead duties. BoA is cute and appealingly impudent, but a bit more remote. On the floor, however, their chemistry ignites.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    An intermittently diverting stew of low-budget effects and potty-mouth humor.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    Kabbalah Me, which distinguishes between “narrow consciousness” and “expanded consciousness,” merely walks the middle ground.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    The find here is Alexa Nisenson as Georgia, Rafe’s know-it-all little sister, who takes cars out for a spin. She is blessed with the best lines, comic and dramatic, and appears delightfully cognizant of the fact. If only the movie had more of her.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    Mr. Mercer’s character doesn’t attract sympathy comparable to that for Ms. Townsend’s (Ms. Lore’s Harper fares better), but there is no holding back on the worms, dermatologic nightmares, venereal-disease metaphors and hints of future sequels. Start stocking up now on the Pepto-Bismol.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    The directors, Dallas Hallam and Patrick Horvath, are fluent in the genre’s staples (creaky interiors, slamming doors, yada yada yada), lighting schemes and startling edits. And they draw decent work from their actors, who commit to the wispy, subtext-free material.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    The film’s director, Liz Tuccillo — a former writer for “Sex and the City,” an author of “He’s Just Not That Into You” and now developing a sitcom for Lauren Graham — is predictably facile with comic rhythms, though her dialogue tilts toward the glib, and her characterizations toward the familiar.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    A movie of modest means that nevertheless offers a fairly cohesive story and at least one standout performance. It may underplay an idea laden with potential, but at least that notion is present.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    Complete Unknown is a curious hybrid, teetering between a thriller and a romance only to land in a nebulous spot that is neither.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    For all its gloss, “Kundo” fails to resonate. You appreciate the execution, but the film is hindered by its lack of novelty and metaphorical weight.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    There’s solid acting in Childless, but mostly there are words — torrents of them.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    Despite Mr. Yen’s impressive physical virtuosity, his stoic, often humorless presence tends to neutralize the emotional temperature.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    Freedom does not remotely approach, say, “12 Years a Slave” in its production values or dramatic impact. But it does offer Mr. Gooding, whose weathered countenance is no longer the exuberantly cherubic face featured in “Jerry Maguire.” In its place is something more interesting: a quiet, rugged and arresting conviction.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    The Uruguayan director Federico Veiroj’s leisurely comedy-drama The Apostate has its charms, though the story (and its hero) could benefit from a tarter approach.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    Mr. Garlin has such a soft touch that at times the film feels feather-light, almost devoid of emotional traction.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    The longtime friends Mr. Guzmán and Mr. Garcia have an unforced chemistry. But the effective jokes land too rarely. You’ll be ready to leave when the trip is over.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    This tale of a yuppie couple (played by Ayushmann Khurrana and Sonam Kapoor) flirts with intriguing notions of recessionary struggle, though strained, contrived humor bogs it down.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    Ms. Burdge — all quicksilver emotion and exposed nerve endings — is an endlessly watchable focal point. Her character’s vulnerability, uncertainty and growing self-acceptance lend the movie a necessary gravity.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    There’s claustrophobia to burn in Steven C. Miller’s Submerged, a modest thriller offering glints of talent amid predictable plot threads.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    Desert Dancer explores fascinating aspects of present-day Iran but suffers mightily from simplistic and sentimental tendencies.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    “Sea of Monsters” is diverting enough...but it doesn’t begin to approach the biting adolescent tension of the Harry Potter movies.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    A lively closing dance sequence, after an earnest, underwhelming climax, pays affectionate tribute to Bollywood production numbers. But you won’t find Mr. Chan’s customary bloopers over the closing credits.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 50 Andy Webster
    Offers mild youthful rebellion and even milder youthful ardor.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    It is Ms. McAllister who is the brightest light amid the talky, often sentimental exchanges. She lends charm and conviction to a character who might otherwise have proved insufferable.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    Mr. Nakashima, it must be said, does have a knack for composition. But the torrential, if glossy, violence — he adores juxtaposing innocuous pop ditties with gruesome set pieces — grows tiresome.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    37
    It is a competent if sometimes heavy-handed affair, a mosaic of fictitious and underexplored characters who hear the assault but are too self-preoccupied to act.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    The Paranormal Activity movies have always been about carnival-ride sensations, the narrative through-line secondary. That’s fortunate, because those seeking closure to what continuity there has been will go home mostly disappointed.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    Ventura Pons’s stagy drama Virus of Fear tries to walk a thin line about its volatile subject — child sexual abuse — as it weighs a man’s possible innocence against a mob’s rage. But its attempts at ambiguity work against it.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    The trouble lies in Tyler Hisel’s script, which teems with wheezy conventions.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    Mr. D'Souza stumbles when interviewing George Obama, the president's half-brother, an activist who voluntarily lives amid squalor in Nairobi, Kenya. "Obama has not done anything to help you," Mr. D'Souza says. "He's taking care of me; I'm part of the world," George Obama replies.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    Mostly, Last Weekend is an elegiac ode to affluence.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    Despite its sense of mission, the film suffers from soapy excesses and narrative disjunctures.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    24 Exposures plays like an exercise. With a thin plot — the usual parade of possible killers — it falls to the actors to provide zing.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    [A] strained, overheated thriller.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    Sure, the new action workout Kickboxer: Vengeance — a reboot of a foot-fighting franchise from the 1980s and ’90s — follows a tiresome martial-arts movie formula. But amid the hoary conventions are agreeable inklings of an alternate sensibility.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    It’s all very solemn, convoluted and a bit bloody, but not engrossing, despite impressive cinematography by Jasmin Kuhn and Mr. dela Torre and the best efforts of a hard-working cast.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    It’s all high-end flash, but less romantic than wearying.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    A modest effort only fitfully attaining its aims.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    As with other staples of the screen-parody genre, the comic bull’s-eyes arrive only intermittently.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    If not for Mr. Jones, “Resurrection,” while competently edited, would be devoid of humor, an area where Mr. Statham has shown promise in the past.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    Its willful determination to be outré proves its undoing.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    Deficient even in most of its set pieces, In the Blood does Ms. Carano (and Caribbean tourism) few favors. Somebody, please give her a better script and director.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    Relationships unfold with a bright, glossy and antiseptic sentimentality in Park Hyun-gene’s Like for Likes, which brings abundant social media usage to shopworn rom-com contrivances.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    For all the healing here — the revived include a bird, an ailing uncle and a blind man — The Young Messiah performs no miracles.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    For all the movie’s flashy pyrotechnics and pulverizing techno-ish musical numbers, gleaning an emotional pulse can be challenging.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    The film is about exotic locations (including a volcano), garish humor (often at the expense of Mr. Chan or women), fisticuffs, stunts and frenetic visual bombast.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    For all its spectacle, The Fatal Encounter is wanting for profundity.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    Tai Chi Hero merely fills the eye, offering little that stays with you.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    The conventions are trundled out in Stanley J. Orzel’s cross-cultural romance, Lost for Words, but not the tension or the chemistry.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    [A] glossy, fawning valentine to conspicuous consumption.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    What Lotus Eaters can take pride in are Gareth Munden’s stunning black-and-white cinematography and Ms. Campbell-Hughes, a riveting visual subject suggesting miles of internal depth. She makes this wallow in callow company watchable.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    Although the subject is potent, the film, directed with a seemingly effortless commercial acumen, doesn’t burrow deeply.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    While this unrelentingly midtempo movie milks Brooklyn for its chic, it manages to denude it of its color.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    The script, by Mr. Dekker, spirals into a muddle of ambiguity, leaving only the imagery and the performances to save the movie. And try as they might, they cannot.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    The emotional dynamics in domestic violence, for the abuser and the abused, are often too disturbing and complex to be treated as superficially as The Living does.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    A “EuroTrip” with balance sheets, the slick, innocuous comedy Unfinished Business fails to seal the deal.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    Underlying this overlong and overheated enterprise is a surfeit of ambition. Maybe too much.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 Andy Webster
    The film rests on the attractive but opaque Ms. Thorne, who is not ready for such weight. Commendably, she stretches her acting muscles, but Hazel’s internal struggle remains elusive. Viewers need more to connect with.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    The biggest offender is the director, Imtiaz Ali, who, also again collaborating with Mr. Kapoor, actually celebrates two love affairs: Ved and Tara’s, and (given Ved’s universal adulation) Mr. Ali’s with his own self-aggrandizing vision of his calling.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    The actors, including Erin Boyes as another captive, try to infuse their characters with depth, and the cinematographer, Scott Winig, lends the proceedings a professional gloss, especially in nighttime scenes. But their efforts cannot lift the story beyond its thin, lurid premise.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    The Rambler...feels like a slender plot with additional scenes pasted on.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    Penélope Cruz is an Oscar-winning actress we don’t see often enough in prominent leading roles. So how disappointing to find her having to carry Julio Medem’s florid Ma Ma, a melodrama only glancing at profundity.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    [A] disposable comedy.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    The horror anthology has a long tradition, going at least as far back as the British classic “Dead of Night,” in 1945. The best offer surprise endings or a sense of humor. You won’t receive much of either here. Just vertigo and maybe a wicked case of induced attention deficit disorder.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    “He can move the mountains.” “I was blind but now I see.” Those lines are but drops in the torrent of clichés saturating Michael John Warren’s narcotizing documentary Hillsong — Let Hope Rise.
    • 11 Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    Marlon Wayans’s satire “A Haunted House” got to “Paranormal” first, and for a much smaller budget delivered bigger laughs.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    Limp pacing and countless shots of Washington’s skyline plague the narrative. Ms. Smollett-Bell exudes an earthy appeal, but it’s the charismatic Mr. Jones who steals the picture. Given all the stifling preachiness, that’s to be expected.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    The film, financed by a Kickstarter campaign, looks polished enough. But its investors’ money might have been better spent elsewhere.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    It’s depressing to see Ms. Moretz — so spirited in “Clouds of Sils Maria” and the “Kick-Ass” movies — reduced to constant mooning at Mr. Roe.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    If you’re a boy between, say, 8 and 12 and wired to the hilt on Coca-Cola, the shrill, exhausting “Gold” might be for you. But only if.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    Bad Kids of Crestview Academy traffics in exploitation movie flourishes.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    This belabored comedy, directed by Benjamin Epps, has a slick visual veneer and some capable performances, especially by Ms. Rulin and Ms. King. But the script, by Matt K. Turner, is loaded with contradictions, its hollow flirtation with subversion amount to airplane pablum.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    Feels like a religious tract more than a movie.
    • 23 Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    The sophomoric humor may be absent, but in its place is only a soufflé of whimsy, seasoned with soot, that fails to rise.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    Disappointing plot twists ensue in a climactic brawl starved for snappier choreography and editing.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 30 Andy Webster
    Despite Mr. Ransone’s goofy charm, Sinister 2 can’t claim the same finesse, substituting pedestrian plotting and a more graphic gore for the original’s restraint.
    • 12 Metascore
    • 20 Andy Webster
    The familiar special effects are not the most disappointing element here. It’s the squandering of the talented Ms. Heche, who is given top billing but almost nothing to do.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 20 Andy Webster
    It has little story to tell and few ideas to offer. Just a great deal of product to sell.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 20 Andy Webster
    An entwined triptych of sorts unified by invective, slurs and characters demanding that others shut up, Run It is a very patchy affair.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 20 Andy Webster
    A spare trifle carried largely by its leading actress.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 20 Andy Webster
    Overabundant diffuse lighting and wide-angle perspectives only compound this horror movie’s deficiencies in plot and dialogue.
    • 14 Metascore
    • 20 Andy Webster
    The Offering, a muddled horror film, falls over itself incorporating as many genre elements as possible. The result is the cinematic equivalent of combining every paint color on a canvas: a murky mess.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 20 Andy Webster
    This is pap, plain and simple: scattered raunch-lite devoid of emotional resonance. At best, it sells itself on the spectacle of a TV show’s cast reunion — and even then it disappoints.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 20 Andy Webster
    A smorgasbord of empty calories, the Vin Diesel vehicle The Last Witch Hunter, for all its overstuffed visuals, leaves you hungry. But not for more.
    • 13 Metascore
    • 20 Andy Webster
    You won’t find much offensive in Kevin James’s slick, innocuous vehicle Paul Blart: Mall Cop 2. You won’t find much prompting an emotional reaction in general, so familiar are the jokes and situations. If Mr. James’s character thinks of safety first, so does this movie, to its extreme detriment.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 10 Andy Webster
    The humor, when it isn’t overcooked, can be downright insulting or worse.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 0 Andy Webster
    Already the franchise displays a sputtering exhaustion.

Top Trailers