For 1,562 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ann Hornaday's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Nowhere to Hide
Lowest review score: 0 Whatever Works
Score distribution:
1562 movie reviews
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    A brilliant piece of filmic writing, one that bursts with fierce urgency, not just for the long-unresolved history it seeks to confront, but also in its attempt to understand what is happening here, right now.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Monsieur Lazhar resembles a clear, clean glass of water: transparent, utterly devoid of gratuitous flavorings or frou-frou, and all the more bracing and essential for it.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Oropelled by memorable performances by mostly unknown actors. The most famous of the ensemble, Hanna Schygulla, delivers a by turns serene and shattering performance as a mother struggling with loss, conscience and the first glimmers of unexpected connection. She's only one essential and unforgettable part of a flawless whole.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    As a film that dares to honor small moments and the life they add up to, Boyhood isn’t just a masterpiece. It’s a miracle.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Rarely has love at any age been depicted so honestly on screen. For such a fully realized portrait to be created by a 28-year-old first-time director is even more remarkable.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Detroit is an audacious, nervy work of art, but it also commemorates history, memorializes the dead and invites reflection on the part of the living. In scale, scope and the space it offers for a long-awaited moral reckoning, it’s nothing less than monumental.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    A thoroughly absorbing, even transfixing, journey to a future that may already be upon us.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 95 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    It’s possible to watch Carol simply for its velvety beauty, but chances are that, by that stunning final moment, filmgoers will realize with a start that they care far more about the problems of these two people than they might have realized.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Goodbye Solo is visually simple and stunning, especially the haunting nightscapes of Solo's perambulations. But more important, Goodbye Solo is driven by deep feeling and sensitivity. Don't miss it.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    In spirit, and sheer joie de vivre, it's everything the movie business should aspire to. Win Win exemplifies movies the way they oughtta be.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Both grimly naturalistic and infused with classical values at their most thoughtfully composed, Land of Mine is epic but deeply intimate; elegant but tough.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    A shattering vérité portrait of the disintegration of Iraqi society in the period immediately following the withdrawal of U.S. troops from that country, this urgent, of-the-moment film doesn’t explain the ensuing chaos as much as plunge viewers into it firsthand, offering a terrifying, ultimately moving portrait of the effects of war, both physical and psychic.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Propelled by an ingenious script by Aaron Sorkin, given vibrance and buoyancy by director Danny Boyle, Steve Jobs is a galvanizing viewing experience.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Seymour: An Introduction gives viewers a soaring, sublime and enduringly meaningful glimpse of a man who is undoubtedly the real thing.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    A riotous, rapturous explosion of sound and color, Black Orpheus is less about Orpheus's doomed love for Eurydice than about Camus's love for cinema at its most gestural and kinetic.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    This soulful, unabashedly lyrical film is best enjoyed by sinking into it like a sweet, sad dream. When you wake up, a mythical place and time will have disappeared forever. But you’ll know that attention — briefly, beautifully — has been paid.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    In addition to being a study in great acting, this is a study in great directing.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    There are several reasons to see Selma — for its virtuosity and scale, scope and sheer beauty. But then there are its lessons, which have to do with history, but also today: Selma invites viewers to heed its story, meditate on its implications and allow those images once again to change our hearts and minds.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Morgen plunges viewers completely into the anarchic, exhilarating, finally ambiguous world of 1968 America; his final stroke of genius is his choice of music, which includes a breathtaking use of Eminem's "Mosh."
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Through it all, Spall is equally enigmatic and transfixing: With his guttural croaks and barks, his Turner is often difficult to understand, but, thanks to Spall’s amazing physical performance and Leigh’s sensitive, information-laden direction, he’s never incomprehensible.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Museum Hours is every bit as masterfully conceived and executed as the art works that serve as the film’s lively cast of supporting characters.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Superbly shot and accompanied by an alternately angular and lyrical score by Mica Levi, Jackie would have been an exceptionally smart, intriguing movie as an astutely conceived, well-crafted meditation on political mythmaking. In Larraín and Portman’s hands, it becomes something deeper and more emotionally potent.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Amour is a must-see film that not everyone must see, at least right now.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    McQueen has taken the raw materials of filmmaking and committed an act of great art.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    The bravura gestures work gorgeously in Birdman, as does the humor, which playfully balances the film’s most mystical, contemplative ideas with a steady stream of inside jokes and well-calibrated shifts in tone and dynamics.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Hypnotically absorbing film.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Even at its most daft and infectiously ditzy, Mistress America is a sharp, aware and surpassingly kind portrait of the agony and ecstasy of becoming yourself.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    You know a filmmaker is in supreme command of her medium when what she creates feels less like a movie than a candid glimpse of ongoing lives that will continue to play out long after the lights have come on.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Coppola brilliantly conjures the young queen's insular world, in which she was both isolated and claustrophobically scrutinized.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Vallée, working with a lean, lively script by Craig Borten and Melisa Wallack, neatly avoids excess, letting Woodroof’s terrific yarn stand on its own and getting out of the way of his extraordinary actors, who channel the story without condescension or manipulative cheats.

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