For 1,529 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ann Hornaday's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 American Beauty
Lowest review score: 0 The DUFF
Score distribution:
1529 movie reviews
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Prove(s) once again how ingenious, artful and flat-out entertaining animation can be.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Taut, unsettling, haunting and powerful.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Captain Phillips is such an impressive dramatic achievement that it comes as a shock when it gets even better, during a devastating final scene in which Hanks single-handedly dismantles Hollywood notions of macho heroism in one shattering, virtually wordless sequence.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Inherent Vice unfolds so organically, so gracefully and with such humanistic grace notes that even at its most preposterous, viewers will find themselves nodding along, sharing the buzz the filmmaker has so skillfully created.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    An exhilarating, often mind-blowing history of surfing.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    In providing audiences a chance to bear witness to unspeakable suffering as well as dazzling defiance and human dignity, Sissako has created a film that’s a privilege to watch.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Captain Fantastic leaves viewers with the cheering, deeply affecting image of a dad whose superpowers lie in simply doing the best that he can.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    You know you're in the hands of a superbly gifted filmmaker when he can pull off a talking dog.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Thanks to Cuarón’s prodigious gifts, Gravity succeeds simultaneously as a simple classic shipwreck narrative (albeit at zero-gravity), and as an utterly breathtaking restoration of size and occasion to the movies themselves.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Only someone with intimate knowledge of the Midwest’s singular cadences, social codes and confounding emotional stew (er, covered hot dish) of aggression and politesse could pull off something as masterful, meaningful and poetic as Nebraska.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    The narrative is lean, the supporting performances are solid, and, perhaps most crucially, the emotional tone of the piece is spot-on.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Up
    The result is a soaring, touching, funny and altogether buoyant movie that lives up to its title in spirit and in form.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    The power of the film is cumulative, as the filmmaker spins a mesmerizing morality tale from the dross of daily life. In his skillful hands, the ordinary turns out to be anything but.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    A mesmerizing cinematic journey that is often as arduous and spare as the lives of its hard-bitten protagonists.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    When viewers are ultimately released from The Hurt Locker's exhilarating vice grip, they'll find themselves shaken, energized and, more than likely, eager to see it again.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    In this vibrant, lyrical, graphic, sobering and finally soaring testament to aesthetic and political expression, Noujaim consistently provides light where once there was heat.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    A smart, alert, supremely entertaining movie.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    The real star in La La Land is the movie itself, which pulses and glows like a living thing in its own right, as if the MGM musicals of the “Singin’ in the Rain” era had a love child with the more abstract confections of Jacques Demy, creating a new kind of knowing, self-aware genre that rewards the audience with all the indulgences they crave...while commenting on them from the sidelines.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Qualifies as the most painful, poetic and improbably beautiful film of the year.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    This audacious hybrid of cinematic styles is pure entertainment.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    The title represents size and power, speed and hubris -- the very things the ship has come to stand for and the things that Cameron has restored to the cinema with grand, generous style.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Ambitious, affecting, unwieldy and haunting, it's an eccentric, densely atmospheric, morally hyper-aware masterpiece that refuses to follow the strictures of conventional cinematic structure, instead leading the audience on a circuitous journey down the myriad rabbit holes that comprise modern-day Manhattan.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    A pitch-perfect movie that threads a microscopically tiny needle between high comedy and devastating drama.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Feisty, funny, fizzy and deeply wise, Enough Said sparkles within and without, just like the rare gem that it is.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    With grace, discretion and supreme tact, Nicks sweeps viewers to a climactic montage that wordlessly honors the best ways we care for one another. The Waiting Room bears poetic witness to an overlooked fact: America's health care system may be broken, but its people are anything but.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    To watch Bad Education is to revel, along with Almodovar, in the power of cinema to take us on journeys of breathtaking mystery and dimension and beauty.
    • 96 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Intense, unflinching, bold in its simplicity and radical in its use of image, sound and staging, 12 Years a Slave in many ways is the defining epic so many have longed for to examine — if not cauterize — America’s primal wound.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    The Queen of Versailles turns out to be a portrait -- appalling, absorbing and improbably affecting -- of how, even within a system seemingly designed to ensure that the rich get richer, sometimes the rich get poorer.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    While Wright's self-conscious theatricality and dollhouse aesthetic conjure comparisons to Baz Luhrmann and Wes Anderson, he outstrips both those filmmakers in moral seriousness and maturity.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Ann Hornaday
    Magnificently acted, expertly crafted and unerringly sure of every treacherous step it takes, Leviathan is an indictment, but also an elegy, a film set among the monumental ruins of a culture, whether they’re the skeletal remains of boats, a whale’s bleached bones, a demolished building or a trail of lives that are either ruined or hopelessly resigned.

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