For 1,272 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ann Hornaday's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 American Movie
Lowest review score: 0 Tammy
Score distribution:
1,272 movie reviews
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Ann Hornaday
    Gets viewers inside these tense, emotional and occasionally terrifying events with immediacy and, given the confusion of the time, remarkable clarity.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    In many ways Fish Tank joins "An Education" and "Precious" as an acute, empathic portrait of a girl growing up, but more than those films Arnold leaves viewers with a feeling of unsettled ambiguity.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Audiard delivers on and exceeds the promise he evinced in that earlier film, drawing viewers into the densely layered, ruthless ecology of a French prison and, against all odds, making them not mind staying there awhile.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    The Cider House Rules is about many things -- chance, passivity, free will and self-invention -- but ultimately it comes back to Larch, who emerges as a toweringly noble figure even in his weakest moments.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 64 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    The movie's best moments belong to Bill Murray,
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Absorbing, artfully executed.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    The kind of movie that gives mainstream Hollywood star vehicles a good name.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 87 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Hard to take in its particulars.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    McTeer delivers a messily cheerful performance as a woman who thinks nothing of brushing her teeth with beer.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Taymor conjures images that are as indelible as they are wordlessly articulate.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    (Penn)'s is a lovely, soulful performance in a movie that manages to imbue tragedy with just the right grace note of insouciance -- a movie worthy of Woody Allen himself.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    It gets under your skin and into your head, and you don't want it to leave.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    A grand, sweeping nostalgia trip that evokes the sickness of an era even as it tries to find its essential humanity.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Dense, ironic and thoroughly engrossing caper melodrama.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Well worth the wait.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    The movie is, to borrow Rob's phrase, unassailably cool.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    The conventional and the cliche are slam-dunked in favor of a fresh, authentic take on passion, ambition and coming of age.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Accomplishes a delicate balancing act, that of entertaining the audience with the thrills and adventure of the Andrea Gail's final journey.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    The only thing missing from this rich production is an emotional charge, which Highsmith could create on the page but which Minghella doesn't quite capture on screen.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Inception is that rare film that can be enjoyed on superficial and progressively deeper levels, a feat that uncannily mimics the mind-bending journey its protagonist takes.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Manages to be both engrossing history and astonishingly germane to present-day political debates.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Holofcener has accrued a rabid, loyal following for her singular brand of observant wit and aching tenderness. Both pour forth in abundance in Please Give, a wry, wistful portrait of contemporary urban manners.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Equal parts playful, sophisticated and engrossing, The Adjustment Bureau is like the first songbird of spring, signaling that the winter of our collective brain-freeze is over and it's safe to go back to the multiplex.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    It's as soothing and pure as the sweetest water from the deepest well.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Emerges as the summer's first true must-see film, required viewing for everyone, but especially audiences in Washington.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    If you think you've absorbed all you could about subprime mortgages, credit default swaps and the arcana of elaborate derivatives, think again. Inside Job traces the history of the crisis and its implications with exceptional lucidity, rigor and righteous indignation.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Although Ralston's act of desperation is admittedly difficult to watch, viewers who might avoid the film out of squeamishness would be depriving themselves of one of the year's most exhilarating cinematic experiences.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    A near-masterpiece of a film set in the hothouse world of New York ballet.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    It's the kind of absorbing, attractive, unfailingly tasteful enterprise that a critic can recommend without caveat.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    If you think "Rocky" and "Raging Bull" define the alpha and omega of boxing movies, think again. David O. Russell's The Fighter proves there's still punch in the genre, especially when a filmmaker tells a familiar story in a brand-new way.