For 1,368 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ann Hornaday's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Amy
Lowest review score: 0 End of Days
Score distribution:
1,368 movie reviews
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    As vivid as many scenes are, there are just as many that seem taken directly out of the Cute Irish Movie notebook.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    Might provide a much-needed fix for Mac's most ardent fans, but they'll have to wait for a star vehicle that fully exploits the range of his comic gifts.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    Even within what often looks like a self-indulgent exercise in humiliation, pain and gratuitous gore, there is no denying the moments of genuine and powerful feeling in The Passion of the Christ -- some of which, by the way, evoke Jesus's most profound teachings of Jewish principles.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    Volckman and Miance are undoubtedly superb draftsmen; what they need is a writer of comparable skill.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    Within this structurally baggy weepie, at least two perfectly good movies fight to break free, one a provocative legal thriller, the other a melodrama.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    At the movie's thoroughly expected conclusion, a visual joke has a bedraggled cat licking at the icing on a wedding cake, but it's really Melanie who gets to have it and eat it, too.
    • Washington Post
    • 40 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    He has a knack for creating vivid characters even in the briefest of vignettes in his live act, many of which are taken from his life, growing up poor in Greenbelt.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    No matter how much fun it is to watch -- and for hard-core movie fans, it is often enormous fun -- there's a certain relief when it stops and we're popped back out to our banal, one-track lives.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    There's too much slow-mo and too many music cues, but there's a low-key buzz to Wahlberg's scenes with Greg Kinnear.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    McDormand is the best thing about Laurel Canyon. She's also the most unfortunate victim of a film that seems unable or unwilling to give even its most intriguing and compulsively watchable character her due.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    Most revelatory here is Malli, who defies the stereotype of submission and subservience and emerges as a woman of self-possession and substance. (The earthily beautiful Bat-Sheva Rand infuses the character with a generous dollop of her own zaftig sensuality.)
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    Make no mistake: The War Tapes is not an overtly political film. It appears to grind no partisan ax nor score either red or blue points. Whether viewers support the war or not -- or find themselves somewhere in the mushy middle -- this documentary won't fit comfortably into the pigeonholes of their preconceptions.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    The dour, downbeat story eventually spirals into grisly Grand Guignol and contrivance. Still, Gordon-Levitt is superb, and Jeff Daniels delivers a wry and wily performance as Pratt's blind roommate.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    Manages to be a diverting and funny character study, at least most of the time.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    Unfortunately, for all its good music and admirable vocal impersonations, Walk the Line slides -- very, very slowly -- downhill.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    Fellowes has brought intelligence and control to the eternally vexing question of whether the right thing is always the good thing.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    What might have been a fascinating, intimate portrait turns into something much less compelling when Clark tries to impose a sex-and-action-packed narrative on the proceedings.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    If Loggerheads sometimes feels too forced, it features some unforgettable performances, especially by Hunt, an accomplished comedienne who makes an impressive debut as a dramatic lead here.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    For all its contrivances, Breaking and Entering has its finger on the pulse of contemporary London life and possesses its share of fleeting delights, chief among them the sublime Robin Wright Penn as Law's live-in girlfriend.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    With a slick visual style similar to "Monster House", Open Season trots out tropes that recent animated classics have done with more wit and smarts.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    Will probably appeal most to hard-core fans of Japanese animation and its wide-eyed style, both visual and philosophical.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    The film's unforgettable stars are the beauty academy's students, women who have survived tribal warfare, Soviet invasion, Muslim tyranny, American bombs, patriarchal families and even Western good intentions with extraordinary grace and fortitude.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    This is a carefully conceived, thoughtfully orchestrated effort in taste and restraint that ultimately is too restrained and tasteful.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    An uneven, sophomoric and only fitfully funny omnibus of skits, The Ten is one of those silly-on-purpose ensemble exercises that must have been wildly fun to make.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    Often funny (just listen to Becky fulminate against Harry Potter), but it's also a scary.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    Unfolds as a series of meticulous tableaux vivants, but like those parlor pastimes, it lacks physical verve and a compelling emotional charge.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    On the Outs has its rewards, especially in the mesmerizing performance of Marte.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    Say this for Confetti: It's a crowd-pleaser. If, that is, the crowd is composed of people who have never seen a movie by Christopher Guest or a TV show starring Ricky Gervais.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    Will probably appeal only to the most committed of Leigh fans.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    The sexual frankness is refreshing. As Suzette and Lavinia banter, their dialogue often suggests how "Sex and the City" might sound 20 years hence.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    Some viewers will miss the warmth and boisterous family dynamics of its predecessors.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    It's a warm, if pallid, romantic comedy that may not do much more to burnish Lopez's reputation, but will certainly not bruise it.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    Jagged, unrelenting, claustrophobically intimate.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    Consistently absorbing -- thanks in large part to strong performances from the actors -- but not particularly rewarding.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    The movie goes off the rails only when the filmmaker inadvertently legitimizes the Protocols' loony philosophical heirs by interviewing a New York medical examiner and a widow about the remains of one of 9/11's Jewish victims.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    It doesn't open up much new territory, except to eschew much of the dark, frank sexuality that has characterized such recent sexual coming-of-age movies as "Mysterious Skin." Instead, Bardwell offers a cheerful, if sometimes strenuously earnest, take on a subject that seems overdue for a lighthearted touch.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    A movie that soars whenever Child is on the screen and sags when Powell shows up.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    The first two-thirds of Joyeux Noel are strangely inert, but the film ends with a moving and surprisingly sophisticated meditation on the definition of moral duty.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    The film is ultimately too self-regarding, too smug to be transcendent itself.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    Admittedly, this is the stuff of lurid adolescent distraction, not great cinema. Jennifer's Body is strictly a niche item but provides a goofy, campy bookend to "Drag Me to Hell" on the B-movie shelf. Watch it, forget it, move on.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Ann Hornaday
    As a tasteful take on a minor novel, Metroland is genteel enough, but it lacks the urgency and scope of a must-see movie. [07 May 1999]
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Pirouettes along a beguiling but treacherous line between horror and whimsy.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    With its shambling, felicitously contrived structure and Fellini-esque climax, it's some kind of Jungian slacker fable.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    At once daring and hackneyed, absorbing and off-putting, a triumph of one sort and, more lastingly, a failure of another.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    An unobjectionable if uninspired updating of a classic family story for the minivan generation.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Never lets viewers fully inside Erik and Paul's world, a reticence that isn't helped by the actors' fey, restrained-to-a-fault performances. That and a frustratingly episodic structure make what might have been a raw and inspiring portrait of commitment and boundaries a surprisingly uninvolving, arms-length enterprise. Keep the Lights On lets go just when it should be holding you tighter.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Trouble With the Curve presents viewers with a frustrating change-up: What promised to be a modest, refreshingly unforced little comedy turns out to be low energy to a fault.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Ferrell and Hart have a genial, easygoing chemistry and Get Hard manages to score more than a few good points about facile assumptions and toxic hypocrisy.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Dogs and the women who love them form the warm and gooey center of Darling Companion, Lawrence Kasdan's fitfully amusing comedy-drama.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Read like a long, anguished prayer, but on screen it looks an awful lot like blasphemy.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Whether the entire production comes off as classy or cloying depends entirely on the viewer's mood.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Both lead players are appealing and attractive enough to make an otherwise tepid movie at least un-excruciating.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Let's get it out, loud and clear: Jerry Maguire is not a sports movie. It's a stealth chick movie, wrapped in a swaddling of jock stuff so that it gets through guy radar without setting off the missile defenses.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Magic Mike XXL tries mightily — if unsuccessfully — to match its predecessor’s stature as a camp classic, the epitome of trashy summer fun for the whole pansexual, polymorphously perverse, omni-libidinous family.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    High-grade cheese, the sort of highly pitched melodrama that in the 1950s would have been the stuff of a lurid, lavishly staged Douglas Sirk picture.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Partridge is such a fatuous, superficial figure that the trick is to make him palatable enough to sustain interest for more than an hour. The filmmakers meet with uneven success.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    The most controversial thriller of the year turns out to be about as exciting as watching your parents play Sudoku.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    One of those cinematic curiosities that almost always fade quickly, but that will usually find a devoted cult audience once it hits that peculiar Elysian Field known as the aftermarket.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    There’s no doubt that Villeneuve can make a movie; he’s developed a strong cinematic voice. It’s tantalizing to imagine what he could do with a really fine story.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    It's all too zany and madcap and Woody Allen-redux to be remotely credible, but Ira & Abby turns out to be witty and winning, in large part because of its cast.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    For the uninitiated? Man, it's a bummer.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    A modestly funny, little bit dark, occasionally knowing, not entirely cynical comedy that, to the extent that it succeeds at all, does so thanks to James Marsden.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Like its own protagonists, Kick-Ass 2 can’t decide what it wants to be when it grows up: a vessel for unhinged vengeance and destruction or a meta-critique of those same impulses. In going for both, it winds up being neither.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    The net effect is one of frustration and will surely send Cohen compleatists back to their record collections for relief.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    With visions of "The Public Enemy," "Bonnie and Clyde" and even "The Assassination of Jesse James by the Coward Robert Ford" dancing in its head, the Prohibition-era drama Lawless winds up being equal to none of them -- even if it holds its own as a modestly respectable genre exercise.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Well, it's better than "The Phantom Menace."
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Little more than a sleek, stylish stunt.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Go For Sisters is worth the time if only to witness the terrific chemistry between Hamilton and Ross, the latter of whom delivers a break-through performance as a woman of uncommon, almost regal, composure, even as she struggles to stay on the righteous path.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    In a textbook example of the have-it-both-ways ethos of self-loathing narcissism, Carell has succeeded in creating a character of old-fashioned decency in a movie that otherwise flouts it at every turn.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Try as it might to entertain serious notions of manhood, evil and original sin, Prisoners works most effectively as Hollywood hypocrisy at its most sleek, efficient and meretricious. It’s stylish, high-minded hokum.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Even Mary Tyler Moore's sunny but vulnerable Mary Richards or Tina Fey's Liz Lemon seem more fleshily real than Becky.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Siegel's depiction of the film's supporting characters too often borders on caricature. By the movie's strained, overheated climax, it's clear that Siegel, in his directing debut, is less interested in his protagonist as a character capable of transformation than as a human petri dish of futility and pathology.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Garca brings his finely calibrated sense of drama to the subject of adoption, which he handles with characteristic restraint and insight -- at least until the film's maudlin, too-pat finale. That sharp melodramatic turn is a shame, because so much of what has gone before in Mother and Child is of real quality.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Tends toward the broadest possible takes on slapstick, sophomoric sexuality and post-"Hangover" raunch.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    With its contrived setups, preposterous coincidences and calculated sentimentalism, Crazy, Stupid, Love seems beamed from the same alternate reality as "Larry Crowne." We might enjoy the ride while we're on it, but it will seem like a visit to another planet once we're home.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Like a gel cap in a sip of orange juice, the psycho-pharmacological thriller Side Effects goes down easily, even if its long-term impact turns out to be barely dis­cern­ible.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Exhibits the weaknesses and the strengths of what has become a nearly foolproof formula for keeping viewers engaged.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Dans Paris will delight aficionados familiar with its myriad references, and there's no denying the appeal of Duris and Garrel. But once the source of the boys' primal wound is revealed, the whole enterprise comes to feel as mechanical as the Bon Marche window display that serves as one of the film's plot points.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    An emotional thriller that is by turns contrived and impassioned.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    There're some low New York laughs in Swingers and some nice clothes if you like bad taste, but on the whole, I'd rather be in Philadelphia. At least they know how to make a sandwich in that town!
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    The movie has been made with consummate carelessness but with occasional moments of knowing humor.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Celeste and Jesse Forever engages in Bridget Jones-like comedy of mortification, sending its heroine down a path of self-discovery that ultimately seems more cruel than revelatory.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Creation is fatally weakened by an excess of pathos; in a Darwinian universe, it would be quickly swallowed up by a leaner, fitter movie.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    A movie sure to reward the filmmaker's most die-hard fans, while doing little to quiet critics who found his work self-conscious to the point of insufferability.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    With Anonymous, director Roland Emmerich gives us "Shakespeare in Luck." Make that "Dumb Luck": In this alternately entertaining and wildly ham-handed speculative romp.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Surprisingly formulaic. So many scenes seem lifted from a 1950s melodrama, from Blake and Francis' repentent mother (Leslie Ann Warren) to the film's tearjerker of a final scene.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Closed Circuit is intriguing, even mildly diverting. That might have been fine for another film at another time, but in light of the here and now, this one should have been more.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    The weakest link here is Heard, who possesses the icy cool of Kim Novak but whose character never quite comes into fuller focus than as a hyper-sexualized object of desire.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    At once belabored and muddled movie, whose dreamy visual style and daring sexual material can't elide glaring inconsistencies in tone, plot and logic.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    If I had to sum up Tristan & Isolde for a term paper, I'd say it's like "Braveheart" without the face paint, "Shrek," except the Lord Farquaad character is a sweetheart, and "Freaks and Geeks" because James Franco is so hot, even in Orlando Bloom-y ringlets.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Possesses its share of modest laughs, many of them delivered by Ted Danson as Bridget's bemused husband. But director Callie Khouri (best known for writing "Thelma & Louise") doesn't bring the dash needed to make this a comic heist on a par with "Ocean's Eleven."
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Ping Pong Summer may not be an instant classic, but it knows its time and place. There’s a humble honor in that.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Baghead provides a diverting showcase for actors you may never have heard of but who deserve a shot at fame and fortune.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Somehow, the comic chemistry never seems to ignite in The Big Year.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    As a piece of filmed entertainment, The Fifth Estate shows why things like authorial point of view and visual sensibility are so essential in bringing such stories to life. Unlike its most obvious predecessor, “The Social Network,” this film doesn’t have much of either, and the weakness shows.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Branagh, who proved his action bona fides with “Thor,” does an inarguably competent job of choreographing a modestly intelligent espionage thriller, even if it’s impossible to identify anything new he’s bringing to an already groaning table.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    A generic, fitfully funny mainstream comedy that doesn’t nearly get the best from its name-brand players but doesn’t qualify as a desecration, either.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    A Letter to Momo is unquestionably lovely to look at, but viewers may not be able to shake the feeling that they’ve seen much of it before, and done better.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    A bit hard on the posterior, it is definitely easy on the eyes.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    If anything, it's worth watching as yet another example of Lynch's extraordinary collaboration with Dern. It may be overstating things to call her performance heroic, but it's nothing if not brave, as she dares to embody Lynch's most brutal impressions of Hollywood -- not as a dream factory, but as the place where dreams come to die.

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