For 1,347 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ann Hornaday's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Seymour: An Introduction
Lowest review score: 0 Splice
Score distribution:
1,347 movie reviews
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Ann Hornaday
    Jack Reacher is a wildly ill-advised miscalculation, with Cruise's virtually unstoppable appeal butting uncomfortably against Reacher's alternately cocky and downright crude cynicism.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 38 Ann Hornaday
    A strange little movie. Unsure whether it wants to be a quirky, sad-eyed indie pixie or a brassy, raunchy broad, it veers uneasily between the two, never quite settling into a comfortable or recognizable groove.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 38 Ann Hornaday
    Anne Fletcher's lifeless comedy about an overbearing mother and her exasperated adult son, has no flawlessly delivered punch lines. It doesn't even have a hangnail.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Ann Hornaday
    Conceived and directed by Madonna, W.E. is a gorgeous mess.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 38 Ann Hornaday
    To his (Snipes) credit, there are few other stars who could breathe a degree of credibility into a film like The Art of War.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Ann Hornaday
    Gerwig remains one of the most captivating new stars to hit the big screen, but she's still looking for a movie that deserves her.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 38 Ann Hornaday
    At some point the foul language, lascivious sight gags, references to sex toys, violence against animals and cruelty toward children simply ceases to be funny.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 57 Metascore
    • 38 Ann Hornaday
    It's a curio, ripe with dreamy atmospherics and intriguing mysteries, but little else.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 38 Ann Hornaday
    All of it makes for a rollicking, outsize tale of overweening ambition and palace intrigue, but J. Edgar instead plays it safe in a turgid, back-and-forth series of tableaux that look as if they were filmed from behind a scrim soaked in weak tea.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 38 Ann Hornaday
    Giamatti provides those small moments of triumph that Duets pretends to celebrate but instead stifles with its sense of superiority.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 37 Metascore
    • 38 Ann Hornaday
    Never makes the Jordans' tribulations feel like anything more than yuppie angst.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 38 Ann Hornaday
    As it is, the audience must content itself with baby poop, naughty words and the female anatomy at its pneumatic extreme, while Bateman and Reynolds's search for transcendence continues.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 37 Ann Hornaday
    It would be dishonest to claim it isn’t funny. The laughs may come in fits and starts, usually by way of sight gags and set pieces, but they do come. And then they go.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 37 Ann Hornaday
    Adore at its core is a bore, nothing more.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 37 Ann Hornaday
    The best thing about awkward moments, after all, is that they usually pass quickly. And, blessedly, just as swiftly forgotten.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 37 Ann Hornaday
    Don’t expect to see a great film, or even a very good one. Whether you discover a meaningful channel with which to continue your walk with the film’s protagonist, however, is strictly between you and your god.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 37 Ann Hornaday
    The film might take its name from poker subculture, but it lacks all the urgency, single-mindedness and swiftness that the title implies at its most literal. Runner Runner is a bummer. Bummer.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 37 Ann Hornaday
    Writer-director Rupert Goold, here making his feature debut, fails to capture the chemistry and tonal complexity necessary to make this grim, often grisly tale anything more than a tragically lurid anecdote.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 37 Ann Hornaday
    As is true with so much of Haggis’s work, Third Person suffers from an airless, too-neat lack of connection with organic life.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 37 Ann Hornaday
    Snyder tries to up the spectacle ante with ever more explosions, crashes, thermal blasts, topological realignments, gunfire and mano-a-mano fistfights. But the result is a punishing sense of diminishing returns and a genre that has finally reached the point of mayhem-induced exhaustion.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 37 Ann Hornaday
    Both assaultive and tiresome, A Good Day to Die Hard barely registers on the action movie Richter scale. It goes bang, it goes boom, and then it blessedly goes away.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 37 Ann Hornaday
    Safe Haven is one of those Valentine’s Day confections that satisfy your sweet tooth until you get to their weird, off-putting center. The problem with movies is that you can’t put them back in the box.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 37 Ann Hornaday
    Although Lee briefly engages in some fascinating ideas linking the vampire’s existence to cultural empowerment, preservation and survival, he squanders that potential in leaden soft-core cliches that usually wind up with him ogling the female form.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 37 Ann Hornaday
    This calculatingly adorable coming-of-age tale has its delights — chiefly in a modest, endearing lead performance from Anton Yelchin and an amusing two-handed turn by Glenn Close and Frank Langella as his parents — but feels more constructed than lived.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 37 Ann Hornaday
    The Zero Theorem doesn’t fully earn the elaborately conceived scaffolding on which its relatively tame ideas are hoisted.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 37 Ann Hornaday
    Even at its lamest and most entitled, this sequel will most likely please fans of the first installment, chiefly because Bateman, Sudeikis and Day are, admittedly, often very funny together.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 37 Ann Hornaday
    2 Guns feels like it’s all been done before, whether by John Woo, Michael Bay or any number of their CGI-happy clones.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 37 Ann Hornaday
    A movie that, despite its strenuous efforts to appear hardened and sexy and sleek, is unforgivably phony, talky and dull.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 37 Ann Hornaday
    Bullock and McCarthy and the chemistry they generate are far more compelling than the movie they’re in. Too often the sketches go on too long, and the coarse, abrasive tone quickly begins to feel repetitive and off-putting.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 37 Ann Hornaday
    White House Down never quite seems to decide what kind of movie it wants to be, although by firepower alone it qualifies as this summer’s most cartoonishly bombastic exercise in sensory overload (so far).

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