For 1,466 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ann Hornaday's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Zero Dark Thirty
Lowest review score: 0 Tideland
Score distribution:
1466 movie reviews
    • 57 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    Some viewers will miss the warmth and boisterous family dynamics of its predecessors.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    It's a warm, if pallid, romantic comedy that may not do much more to burnish Lopez's reputation, but will certainly not bruise it.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    Jagged, unrelenting, claustrophobically intimate.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    Consistently absorbing -- thanks in large part to strong performances from the actors -- but not particularly rewarding.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    The movie goes off the rails only when the filmmaker inadvertently legitimizes the Protocols' loony philosophical heirs by interviewing a New York medical examiner and a widow about the remains of one of 9/11's Jewish victims.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    It doesn't open up much new territory, except to eschew much of the dark, frank sexuality that has characterized such recent sexual coming-of-age movies as "Mysterious Skin." Instead, Bardwell offers a cheerful, if sometimes strenuously earnest, take on a subject that seems overdue for a lighthearted touch.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    A movie that soars whenever Child is on the screen and sags when Powell shows up.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    The first two-thirds of Joyeux Noel are strangely inert, but the film ends with a moving and surprisingly sophisticated meditation on the definition of moral duty.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    The film is ultimately too self-regarding, too smug to be transcendent itself.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Ann Hornaday
    Admittedly, this is the stuff of lurid adolescent distraction, not great cinema. Jennifer's Body is strictly a niche item but provides a goofy, campy bookend to "Drag Me to Hell" on the B-movie shelf. Watch it, forget it, move on.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 58 Ann Hornaday
    As a tasteful take on a minor novel, Metroland is genteel enough, but it lacks the urgency and scope of a must-see movie. [07 May 1999]
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Pirouettes along a beguiling but treacherous line between horror and whimsy.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    With its shambling, felicitously contrived structure and Fellini-esque climax, it's some kind of Jungian slacker fable.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    At once daring and hackneyed, absorbing and off-putting, a triumph of one sort and, more lastingly, a failure of another.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    An unobjectionable if uninspired updating of a classic family story for the minivan generation.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Never lets viewers fully inside Erik and Paul's world, a reticence that isn't helped by the actors' fey, restrained-to-a-fault performances. That and a frustratingly episodic structure make what might have been a raw and inspiring portrait of commitment and boundaries a surprisingly uninvolving, arms-length enterprise. Keep the Lights On lets go just when it should be holding you tighter.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Trouble With the Curve presents viewers with a frustrating change-up: What promised to be a modest, refreshingly unforced little comedy turns out to be low energy to a fault.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Ferrell and Hart have a genial, easygoing chemistry and Get Hard manages to score more than a few good points about facile assumptions and toxic hypocrisy.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Dogs and the women who love them form the warm and gooey center of Darling Companion, Lawrence Kasdan's fitfully amusing comedy-drama.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Read like a long, anguished prayer, but on screen it looks an awful lot like blasphemy.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Whether the entire production comes off as classy or cloying depends entirely on the viewer's mood.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Both lead players are appealing and attractive enough to make an otherwise tepid movie at least un-excruciating.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Its arresting visual design aside, Cafe Society is upper-middle-late-period Allen, a modestly diverting ditty that will never go down as one of his greats. (But, as most can agree, Allen at his most middling is still better than many hacks at their best.)
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Let's get it out, loud and clear: Jerry Maguire is not a sports movie. It's a stealth chick movie, wrapped in a swaddling of jock stuff so that it gets through guy radar without setting off the missile defenses.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    For all of the virtuosity of Redmayne and Vikander’s performances, and for all its sensitivity and aesthetic appeal, The Danish Girl is content simply to present the ambiguities and contradictions of Lili and Gerda’s story, rather than delve into their gnarlier corners.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Magic Mike XXL tries mightily — if unsuccessfully — to match its predecessor’s stature as a camp classic, the epitome of trashy summer fun for the whole pansexual, polymorphously perverse, omni-libidinous family.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    High-grade cheese, the sort of highly pitched melodrama that in the 1950s would have been the stuff of a lurid, lavishly staged Douglas Sirk picture.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Partridge is such a fatuous, superficial figure that the trick is to make him palatable enough to sustain interest for more than an hour. The filmmakers meet with uneven success.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Ewing and Grady insert vignettes featuring a young actor playing Lear as a 9-year-old, wandering an empty theater and trying on his analog’s signature white hat. The conceit might have sounded artful on paper, but it doesn’t work on film.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    The most controversial thriller of the year turns out to be about as exciting as watching your parents play Sudoku.

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