For 1,466 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ann Hornaday's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Carol
Lowest review score: 0 Undiscovered
Score distribution:
1466 movie reviews
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    The weakest link here is Heard, who possesses the icy cool of Kim Novak but whose character never quite comes into fuller focus than as a hyper-sexualized object of desire.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    At once belabored and muddled movie, whose dreamy visual style and daring sexual material can't elide glaring inconsistencies in tone, plot and logic.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    If I had to sum up Tristan & Isolde for a term paper, I'd say it's like "Braveheart" without the face paint, "Shrek," except the Lord Farquaad character is a sweetheart, and "Freaks and Geeks" because James Franco is so hot, even in Orlando Bloom-y ringlets.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Possesses its share of modest laughs, many of them delivered by Ted Danson as Bridget's bemused husband. But director Callie Khouri (best known for writing "Thelma & Louise") doesn't bring the dash needed to make this a comic heist on a par with "Ocean's Eleven."
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Ping Pong Summer may not be an instant classic, but it knows its time and place. There’s a humble honor in that.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Baghead provides a diverting showcase for actors you may never have heard of but who deserve a shot at fame and fortune.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Somehow, the comic chemistry never seems to ignite in The Big Year.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    As a piece of filmed entertainment, The Fifth Estate shows why things like authorial point of view and visual sensibility are so essential in bringing such stories to life. Unlike its most obvious predecessor, “The Social Network,” this film doesn’t have much of either, and the weakness shows.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Branagh, who proved his action bona fides with “Thor,” does an inarguably competent job of choreographing a modestly intelligent espionage thriller, even if it’s impossible to identify anything new he’s bringing to an already groaning table.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    A generic, fitfully funny mainstream comedy that doesn’t nearly get the best from its name-brand players but doesn’t qualify as a desecration, either.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    A Letter to Momo is unquestionably lovely to look at, but viewers may not be able to shake the feeling that they’ve seen much of it before, and done better.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    A bit hard on the posterior, it is definitely easy on the eyes.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    If anything, it's worth watching as yet another example of Lynch's extraordinary collaboration with Dern. It may be overstating things to call her performance heroic, but it's nothing if not brave, as she dares to embody Lynch's most brutal impressions of Hollywood -- not as a dream factory, but as the place where dreams come to die.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    That none of the protagonists earns the audience's sympathy is more likely a failure of the real-life characters rather than the actors, who deliver fine performances -- especially Rhys, who seems to be channeling Richard Burton channeling Dylan Thomas at his most manipulatively loutish.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Rather than taking viewers on a twisty, provocative journey through a mazelike meditation on appearance and reality, The Illusionist finally just sits there, looking like a very well-produced pilot for PBS's "Mystery!" series. It's a sophisticated snooze.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Aquamarine is better than nothing for its woefully underserved audience.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Often seems less like a fully realized film than an illustrated story, its paragraphs reduced to neatly contrived set pieces.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Filmgoers haven't seen a family this neurotically enmeshed since the last Diane Keaton movie.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    It succeeds only fitfully. Toggling between Stark's impish goatee and Iron Man's full-metal body condom, and amid so many generic fireballs, kill shots and earsplitting thumps, bumps and crunches, the film finally collapses under its own weight.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    A frantic, occasionally funny, finally enervating bricolage of special effects, explosive set pieces, sardonic one--liners and notional human emotions, this branch of the Marvel franchise tree feels brittle and over--extended enough to snap off entirely.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Even with all this talent and earnestness, though, Nowhere Boy still feels indulgent, slight and almost instantly forgettable.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    It’s difficult to believe a word of Labor Day, but then again you don’t have to in order to luxuriate in Winslet and Brolin’s bubbling, steaming chemistry.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Funny? Scary? Entirely logical? It all depends on your point of view, of course, and "What's the Matter With Kansas?" isn't likely to move viewers one way or another.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Say this about Stone: When it's good, it's very good. And this twisty, atmospheric drama is at its best when Edward Norton takes center screen as the title character.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Has its modest charms.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    This is a movie guaranteed to please crowds, if only because it insists on their affection so strenuously.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    If Broken English occasionally falls prey to a bit too much self-conscious lethargy, it's still a welcome chance to see Posey at her flighty, edgy best.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    For real sparks keep a look out for Jared Harris in a supporting role that injects a mildly diverting note of corporate intrigue into an otherwise unsurprising procedural.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Like Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton before him, Helms plays a lamb trotting hopefully through the abattoir, blessedly unaware of the blades hanging just above his head.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Ann Hornaday
    Owen Wilson phones it in with Drillbit Taylor, a by-the-numbers teen comedy.

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