For 1,334 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.3 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ann Hornaday's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 Seymour: An Introduction
Lowest review score: 0 Whatever Works
Score distribution:
1,334 movie reviews
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Ann Hornaday
    For all the pain and loss that The Kite Runner depicts, it is still a film of exhilarating, redemptive humanity, conveying an enduring sense of hope.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Ann Hornaday
    Blessedly free of the self-righteous histrionics and sentimentality that so often cheapen powerful personal stories.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Ann Hornaday
    Given the current heightened tenor of religious rhetoric and paranoia, it may well wind up pushing brand-new buttons today. To quote Michael Palin quoting Jesus, "There's just no pleasing some people."
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Ann Hornaday
    It's a gentle, surprising little movie whose rewards lie in what its characters don't say as much as in what they do.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Ann Hornaday
    Nearly every scene rings with its own ragged truth, which becomes increasingly painful as Dan's addiction becomes more unmanageable and as he refuses to confront the untenable politics of his own behavior.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Ann Hornaday
    Beautifully shot and edited with swift efficiency, Black Gold joins a cadre of recent films that shine a welcome light on how the stuff we buy gets to us and, more to the point, how the price of that stuff often has little to do with its real cost.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 80 Ann Hornaday
    Along with such colleagues as Abbas Kiarostami and Moshen Makhmalbaf, Panahi has perfected the art of realist filmmaking,
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Ann Hornaday
    Tells Yuri's story with the same bravado and stylishness as Scorsese at his finest, with bigger-than-life characters and situations splashing across the screen in breathtaking scale.
    • Washington Post
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Ann Hornaday
    If the setting is claustrophobic, it's also bracingly beautiful, a contradiction that is every bit in keeping with Sokurov's preference for ambiguity over clarity.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Ann Hornaday
    Imbued with a greater degree of psychological darkness than before.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Ann Hornaday
    Like all the Dardennes' films, L'Enfant is a vivid, Dickensian report from the most dispossessed precincts of society. But the film concludes on an optimistic note, at least for the Dardennes. It's still the worst of times, the filmmakers seem to suggest, but we're still capable of humanity, if not hope.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Ann Hornaday
    Engaging entertainment and a great work of art.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Ann Hornaday
    A crafty, swift, subtly stylish thriller.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Ann Hornaday
    With one foot planted in the world of comic book fantasy and the other firmly stuck in the grim realities of high school, this is one of those rare family films that truly work for the whole family, even if Mom and Pop might find themselves needing earplugs during some exceedingly long and loud passages.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Ann Hornaday
    The Cortez family flies into action with the same testy family dynamics, silly humor and cool gadgetry that animated the first Spy Kids.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Ann Hornaday
    Jarmusch manages to imbue banality with surprising beauty and humor.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Ann Hornaday
    It testifies to art's vitality and endurance, despite its marketers' -- and sometimes even its makers' -- efforts to the contrary.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Ann Hornaday
    A bummer, but one that manages to stick to its depraved convictions until the strange and bitter end.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Ann Hornaday
    This is an exceptionally assured debut, and Montiel exhibits rare care with editing and sound design. His real forte, though, is casting, to which a brief scene featuring Downey and the incandescent Rosario Dawson powerfully attests.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Ann Hornaday
    Ravishing, often entrancing paean to a pastime that has hooked more than its share of hard-core addicts.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Ann Hornaday
    Thanks to Rock's running monologue, combining scathing humor with trenchant observations, the film manages to be side-splitting even while making its most poignant points.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Ann Hornaday
    Somersault faces the difficulty of representing a girl's unspoken desires and anxieties, a challenge Shortland rises to with terrific skill and aplomb.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Ann Hornaday
    Lee has created that rarity in filmmaking: a movie we need, right now.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Ann Hornaday
    An engrossing piece of social history, a lively, astonishingly well-documented excavation of that period.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Ann Hornaday
    Smith makes it look easy, but underneath the physical high jinks and slick veneer of I, Robot lies a performance of real discipline and intelligence.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    That Detropia won't be just another well-reported urban obituary is clear from the film's arresting opening moments.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    May not achieve the transcendent heights of "Neil Young: Heart of Gold," but it has its own pleasures.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Even at its most troubling, Cyrus is powered by a deep vein of humanism, one that offers hope to even the weirdest among us.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Elmo graciously shares the stage with a cast of players who will not only delight youngsters but will come as sweet relief to grown-ups.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Like Marilyn Monroe and Judy Holliday before him, Tatum is sublime at playing dumb (as a dim pretty boy, he seems to be channeling Brad Pitt in "Burn After Reading"), just as Hill shrewdly deploys his body mass for maximum physical comedy (even slimmed down, with an Oscar nomination under that tightened belt, he carries himself with a fat man's comically elephantine grace).

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