For 1,574 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 48% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 50% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ann Hornaday's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Lady Bird
Lowest review score: 0 Tideland
Score distribution:
1574 movie reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Although Ralston's act of desperation is admittedly difficult to watch, viewers who might avoid the film out of squeamishness would be depriving themselves of one of the year's most exhilarating cinematic experiences.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    In a word, Hell or High Water is terrific.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Taymor conjures images that are as indelible as they are wordlessly articulate.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Holofcener has accrued a rabid, loyal following for her singular brand of observant wit and aching tenderness. Both pour forth in abundance in Please Give, a wry, wistful portrait of contemporary urban manners.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Sully is a classy, enormously satisfying ode to simple competence. To paraphrase the title character, it’s just a movie doing its job. And amen to that.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Manages to be both engrossing history and astonishingly germane to present-day political debates.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    The Cider House Rules is about many things -- chance, passivity, free will and self-invention -- but ultimately it comes back to Larch, who emerges as a toweringly noble figure even in his weakest moments.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    The through-line of Chi-Raq is a sense of crisis that Lee refuses to reduce to binary causes, but interprets in terms of history, economics and psychology, as well as the personal, political and spiritual.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    James White gets up close and personal in often discomfiting ways, but it’s never exploitative or glib. It hits the highs, and the rock bottoms, and all the damnable stuff in between.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    What’s being marketed as a sober, straightforward sci-fi drama (the words “Bring him home” superimposed on an unsmiling Matt Damon inside a space helmet) is instead a smart, exhilarating, often disarmingly funny return to classic adventures of yore.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Absorbing, artfully executed.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Inception is that rare film that can be enjoyed on superficial and progressively deeper levels, a feat that uncannily mimics the mind-bending journey its protagonist takes.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    The kind of movie that gives mainstream Hollywood star vehicles a good name.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 68 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    In Myers’s capable hands, and with a powerful, vanity-free performance by Monaghan, Fort Bliss joins “Coming Home” and “The Best Years of Our Lives” as a movie deeply in sync, not just with the military characters it depicts, but also with the civilian world that awaits them with such confoundingly mixed messages.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    For every misgiving The Eagle Huntress invites, it offers inspiration in equal measure, taking the audience on a beautiful, thrilling journey to a part of the world that is still largely inaccessible. And it introduces them to a young woman who gives bravery a bracing, unforgettable face.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    A compelling, complex, confounding film.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Mud
    This is where a filmmaker’s taste and reflexive sense of balance makes all the difference. Southern culture may be on the skids in Mud, but Nichols’s sensitive portrayal is gratifyingly on the level.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    The only thing missing from this rich production is an emotional charge, which Highsmith could create on the page but which Minghella doesn't quite capture on screen.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Absorbing, inspiring and terrifically entertaining, Undefeated earns its title: It's a winner all the way.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    The Artist is anything but mute, with a lush orchestral score and a little sonic wink at the the end; fewer movies this year reward listening - and watching - so lavishly.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    There’s no doubt that Audiard has invested a story of grief, dispossession and desire with immediate, almost tactile, urgency. Like the best fiction, it takes the most incomprehensible stories of our time and makes them hauntingly, inescapably clear.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Emerges as the summer's first true must-see film, required viewing for everyone, but especially audiences in Washington.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Accomplishes a delicate balancing act, that of entertaining the audience with the thrills and adventure of the Andrea Gail's final journey.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Brad’s Status contains moments of delicate humor.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    A near-masterpiece of a film set in the hothouse world of New York ballet.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    A grand, sweeping nostalgia trip that evokes the sickness of an era even as it tries to find its essential humanity.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 88 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    It's the kind of absorbing, attractive, unfailingly tasteful enterprise that a critic can recommend without caveat.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Iris serves as a spirited, often dazzling primer in how to fight the dying of the light and feel fabulous while doing it.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    A Bigger Splash manages to infuse even the most straightforward questions with vicariously alluring ambiguity.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 88 Ann Hornaday
    Audiard delivers on and exceeds the promise he evinced in that earlier film, drawing viewers into the densely layered, ruthless ecology of a French prison and, against all odds, making them not mind staying there awhile.

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