For 1,560 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 47% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 51% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.8 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ann Hornaday's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Tadpole
Lowest review score: 0 Zoolander 2
Score distribution:
1560 movie reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    For fans of horror at its most sinister, The Witch is not to be missed. It casts a spell that lingers long after its most disquieting mists have cleared.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Eddie the Eagle leaves viewers buoyed by satisfactions unique to classic come-from-behind stories. Even when it’s as ungainly and cravenly audience-pleasing as its protagonist, it soars.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Like "After Tiller" a few years ago, Trapped is lucid and illuminating about the issue of abortion as a constitutional right. But in addition to being instructive, it brims with compassion, leaving viewers with haunting images of women we never even got to see in the first place.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    This is the rare military drama that conveys both the graphic physical effects of war and its lingering psychic cost.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    On one level, The Clan is an accomplished but not terribly original genre exercise — another story about amorality run amok, given an extra jolt from its real-life roots and heightened political context. What sets the film apart are the performances.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    As small and specific as it is, Everybody Wants Some!! feels improbably expansive, even universal.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Nichols establishes such a grounded sense of atmosphere and such superb control of mood and pacing, that the odd hiccup barely matters.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Despite its familiar, come-from-behind contours, the story brims with redemptive optimism that it comes by honestly, thanks to its extraordinary main character and the equally remarkable actor who plays him.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Warm, ingratiating, with a beat you can dance to, Sing Street is a feel-good movie that never demands to be liked. Instead it asks, politely and irresistibly.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Mournful, enigmatic and compulsively engrossing, Fireworks Wednesday gives viewers a chance to watch a master at work — before he was acknowledged as a master.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Crisply photographed, thoughtfully acted and often refreshingly amusing, “Civil War” injects doses of much-needed fun into a genre of filmmaking that’s become mired in dour pretentiousness, when it’s not ridiculing its own excesses in such meta-snark exercises as “Deadpool.”
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Maggie’s Plan exerts unmistakable charm, and once it hits its stride and the titular scheme kicks into gear, the movie takes on its own weird, giddy rhythms and really soars.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Clever, amiable and eager to please, Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping is the comedy equivalent of the pop-rap star it satirizes, a bit of stupid-smart silliness that offers plenty of pleasure in the moment, even if its amusements last about as long as a snow cone in the sun.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Genius may be a bit stodgy and safe, but it tells a story of beauty — as it plays out in an improbably fruitful friendship, and as it’s discovered within vast expanses of raw language by a craftsman who was arguably an artist in his own right.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    In deciding not to stray far from the first film in plot or tone, it makes for a pleasant, familiar, cheerfully unassuming fish-in-her-water tale.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    A documentary in which one of the most voyeuristic directors in American cinema delivers an engaging, if maddeningly unresolved, tutorial in film production and appreciation.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Even when it dispenses with realism altogether, Hunt for the Wilderpeople conveys important truths about the will and sheer endurance it takes to make a family.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Few will emerge from its story of intelligence tradecraft and egregious lapses in oversight without feeling seriously freaked out.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Sunny, slimy and profoundly silly, the new, lady-centric reboot of Ghostbusters immediately silences the backlash and bluster that’s preceded it.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Florence Foster Jenkins brims with love for its characters and forbearance for even their most blinkered self-deception.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Thoughtful, searching and wonderfully moving in its wistful final moments, Lo and Behold may not be Herzog’s most artistically ambitious film, but it’s an intriguing, even important one nonetheless.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Like the warm summer day it chronicles, Southside With You possesses a mellow, languorous vibe, an infectious easygoing charm that insinuates itself gently, then seductively, as the couple at its center experiences the stirrings of what might be true love.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Regardless of how they feel about the main character, most viewers are likely to leave the theater reminded of Stone’s instinctive brilliance as a filmmaker — his grasp of visual language not just to tell a story but to expose its essential emotional core.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    When disaster strikes, about an hour into the movie, we’re put in the uncomfortable position of admiring the fiery spectacle that Berg has created with sophisticated visual effects, cinematography and editing, while being aware that unspeakable real-life suffering has been packaged for mass entertainment. Berg does a good job of maintaining a thoughtful balance between those somewhat uneasy stances.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Right up to its somewhat perfunctory but sneakily satisfying conclusion, Aquarius makes a compelling case for looking up from our ubiquitous distractions to take in the world around us — the one that we live in and, whether we’re aware of it or not, lives in us.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Hacksaw Ridge winds up being a rousing piece of entertainment that also happens to be an affecting portrait of spiritual faith and simple human decency.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Muted, measured and meditative, Arrival brings taste and restraint to a genre in the midst of a mini golden age: It comes in peace.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Snarky and sensitive in just the right measure, what initially looks like a glib exercise in adolescent mortification has the nerve to dig a little deeper. And it winds up mining a little bit of wisdom and compassion in the process.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Suffused with wry humor, vulnerability and radiant warmth, Huppert’s performance captures that delicate period in life during which resignation morphs into graceful, even grateful, acceptance.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    If de Wit’s idea of story is sometimes gratingly simplistic and sentimental, there’s no denying its primal classicism, or the seductive pull of sound and image at their most pure and unfussy.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    The documentary I Am Jane Doe is the kind of film that lifts up a rock that’s been sitting in plain sight year after year, with only a heroic few bothering to see the slithering reality underneath.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    This is a movie squarely directed at adolescents in all their untamed desire, outsize emotion and near-bottomless self-obsession. The filmmakers have crafted a canny delivery system for their life lessons, by way of a movie that balances escapism, candor and ethics with admirable aplomb.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    If Reilly’s presence gives Kong: Skull Island its playful, gonzo edge, it’s the title character himself who gives it soul, morphing from a monster into a brooding symbol of the colossal folly of military belligerence and hegemonic hubris.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    The inherent superiority of the written word notwithstanding, Batra has done a credible and even commendable job of translating Barnes’s intricate prose to the screen, opening up some of its corners, burrowing into its time shifts and, most gratifyingly, elaborating on a few otherwise marginal characters.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    This Beauty and the Beast isn’t predicated on starry-eyed romance or animal attraction, but the solace of mutual loss and understanding, which makes it all the sweeter.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Its virtuosity, wit, fleet performances and cool self-awareness notwithstanding, T2 doesn’t feel like a necessary film as much as a respectful and respectable exercise in fan service.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    As a 30-something coming-of-age story, Colossal is as relatable as they come, its deadpan depiction of lost sheep recalling the Charlize Theron movie “Young Adult.” Vigalondo doesn’t evince the same cynicism and anger as that film reveled in so bitterly, but he’s also not one for easy allegorical equivalencies.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Peppering “Norman” with obliquely mordant observations about Middle East politics, Cedar effortlessly propels the narrative into a sweetly pensive character study of a familiar archetype, which he invests with an angel’s share of humanity and heart.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Flustered, flirty and filled to the brim with compassion, The Lovers is charming, even when it’s proving how hollow charm can be.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Wonder Woman may not cure all the ills of pop culture’s superhero-saturation syndrome; in fact, in many ways it succumbs to some of its worst excesses. But at least it brings an exhilarating, vicarious kick to the sagging, bagging table.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    I, Daniel Blake is about human value: disposable and abstract in one context; eternal, inviolable and sacred in another. They might underline the point a bit too thickly, but Loach and Laverty count on their audience to discern the difference, and to act accordingly.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    It provides a sturdy, often exhilarating bridge between the present and a past that not only isn’t distant, but isn’t even really past.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    On its own terms, The Beguiled is a finely crafted, gemlike exercise in surface tension and subterranean stirrings. Seen through the prism of history and culture, it’s difficult not to feel that some essential truth has been lost in translation.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Landline offers viewers a rueful glimpse of a vanished time and place. Along the way, it’s often unexpectedly and guffawingly funny.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Patti Cake$ winds up being a celebration of art, enterprise and self-invention that’s as tough as it is touching. At the risk of mixing metaphors, not to mention musical genres, it rocks.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    As compelling as Warner’s story is, Crown Heights never quite takes hold cinematically. It’s a procedural whose central protagonist remains necessarily passive and something of a cipher, despite the wellsprings of emotion that Stanfield manages to tap simply by gazing balefully out a cell window.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    There's good trash: throwaway, intellectually undemanding action movies that, despite their heavy body counts and hard edges, are executed with a touch of class and a sunny disposition.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    For movie fans who despair of the state of American cinema, the in-jokes are hilarious.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    A kinetically charged gridiron drama that is enormous fun to watch.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Grisly, stylish and often weirdly funny, Blood Simple is a reminder of how rarely an original artistic sensibility is announced to the world and how much better movies are when that sensibility is allowed to keep going its own way.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Suffused with a sophomoric sensibility that belies its more serious underpinnings.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    If The Eyes of Tammy Faye is skimpy, it's still an important correction to the record about this fascinating and misunderstood woman, who turns out to be much more than just her makeup.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    A quietly resonant movie about the painful alliance between single mothers and their daughters, and the complicated drama of separation.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Jewison's focus on the Canadians' dogged do-gooderism might have actually prevented a good movie from being a great one.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    One of the unique virtues of the cinema is its ability to bring history to life with engrossing detail and gripping immediacy; East-West does this.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Will remind filmgoers that one of the chief pleasures of going to the movies is a good old-fashioned swoon
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Elmo graciously shares the stage with a cast of players who will not only delight youngsters but will come as sweet relief to grown-ups.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    It's a clear-eyed, unsentimental portrait and indelible for that very reason.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    So understatedly good.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Romance, intrigue and old-fashioned movie glamour make a dazzling return in Girl on the Bridge, Patrice Leconte's sumptuous love story with a razor-sharp edge.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Winterbottom ("Welcome to Sarajevo," "Go Now") has filmed Wonderland with a hand-held 16 millimeter camera, lending the production an air of scrappy immediacy that is often arrestingly at odds with Michael Nyman's overheated musical score.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    A glamorous, alluring entertainment that revels in the artifice of Hollywood while exposing its corrupt heart, L.A. Confidential pays stylish homage to some of the great film noirs of the distant and recent past.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Possesses memorable portrayals of thoroughly original characters and draws a beguilingly bleak portrait of its Rhode Island settings.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    An absorbing glimpse not only at the phenomenon of punk rock but also at British social history and the rock star mystique.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    A wonderfully complex character at the center of a gratifyingly satisfying yarn.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Shower makes for a lovely and poignant journey.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    A bawdy, brainy sex comedy geared toward smart people with a sophomoric streak.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    It's the talk...and the extraordinarily expressive faces of those who do the talking, that accounts for its engrossing, enchanting powers.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    With a wistful look at the wages of ambition and the failure of promise, Wonder Boys finally celebrates self-awareness, ending on a muted, quietly moving note of triumph.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    John Turturro's farce about life and theater that is by turns elegant and bawdy, but always transfixing.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Filled with so much heartbreaking beauty, Bringing Out the Dead might be best described as an artist's sketchbook, a series of tableaux and ideas that provide a telling glimpse of a director whose work is always evolving.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Arrives as a balm to seared adult psyches that have endured all manner of assaults at the multiplex this season.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    These guys are funny.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Smith shows the grasp of character and offbeat humor that really registered in "Clerks," and a subtler mastery of film fluidity and professionalism than anything in the cheesy, amateurish "Mallrats."
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Sets up a mood of tensile suspense from the beginning and never lets it go.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    A murder caper that could have been written by Agatha Christie during a pub-crawl.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 91 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Crammed, cheek to jowl, with bleak moments, high hopes, sweetness and naked emotion.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    A quirky and satisfying love story.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Builds slowly but passionately, not dancing to some Hollywood tune, but finding its characters where they are and letting them be who they are.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Tells an important story about a story that might never have been told at all.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    That rare kids' movie that may be even more entertaining for its intended audience's adult companions.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    A lively, compulsively watchable but ultimately sobering film about the men who make their living off prostitution.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 86 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    An engaging yarn and a moving character study, but it's also a sweet, sad glimpse of everyone's future.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Almodovar has created an ecstatic homage to the women who have inspired him all his life.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    X-Men flies to the rescue with superheroes who have real substance.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Fairly bursts with the exuberance and youthful energy that must have attended its creation.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Isn't a noble story, or even a cautionary one: It just feels pretty painfully real.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Once you get the hang of Figgis' own brand of coercion -- one based on an intricate sound design and musical score -- you find yourself happily going along for the ride.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    There is undeniable power in Magnolia, in which small moments of truth are given epic gravitas, not just by Anderson's adroit cinematic style (no one's camera is more restless or inquisitive), but by the wisdom and compassion of the characters he creates.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    The movie dazzles with its slick lines, but there's a situational intelligence at play too -- little vignettes involving minor characters are begun at one wedding and then evolve into major events at the next.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Possesses moments of fleeting grace, pathos and beauty, even if it ultimately doesn't amount to much.
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    It's just another modest, unsurprising little heist flick. So why is it so much fun? Newman.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    Aside from Lillard, the stand-out here is Cook, who plays a new breed of post-feminist Cinderella with a convincing mix of seriousness and vulnerability (although just once, it would be nice if Cinderella could keep her glasses on and still be beautiful). With her doe eyes and peaches-and-organic-yogurt complexion, Cook resembles a young Winona Ryder (if that's possible), right down to the appealing blend of sweetness and self-assurance. [29 Jan 1999: 1E]
    • Baltimore Sun
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Ann Hornaday
    In Babe: Pig in the City, the sunny mood of the Hoggett Farm has been supplanted by darker urban tones, suggesting the arrival of a new cinematic genre: Barnyard Noir.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    May not be the most nutritious movie on the table, but it lives up to its sweet promise.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Clara Khoury delivers a performance that is luminous, fierce and intensely focused as the title character of Rana's Wedding.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Quietly, with pathos and tinges of melancholy humor, Valentin pays homage to the heroism of creating your own world when the one that's on offer breaks your heart.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Will prove infectious to those audiences who find themselves sharing the director's frivolous frame of mind.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Always predictable in its outcome, but it still retains a certain charm, mostly because of Meadows's cheerful sympathy and affection for his motley crew of characters.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    The movie can't help but resonate with a ripped-from-the-headlines topicality.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Packing a dizzying array of motives and tensions into his careful, densely layered round robin, LaBute orchestrates The Shape of Things like a suspense thriller, full of hidden agendas and emotional switchbacks.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    It will all look pretty ridiculous to grown-ups, but to 13-year-old boys (and adults with well-tended inner versions thereof), Biker Boyz will be the perfect testosterone-fueled, flash-edited, music-driven joy ride.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    This is a movie that starts silly and just gets sillier -- at one point Candice Bergen shows up with a Buddhist monk -- but its laughs are sweet-natured, and Heaven knows the lead players earn every one.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Even with its flaws should be cheered for preserving the later years of these towering musical talents.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    A gorgeous, if disjointed, spectacle, made endurable – if not entirely comprehensible – by its eye-popping cast.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    A sweet, even delectable diversion from the more explosive cinematic fare of the season.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    There's no doubt that Eminem has the talent and presence of a star. It's just a shame that the filmmakers didn't capture his power with mad skillz of their own.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Spiked with some genuine show-stopping musical numbers, and the sheer pluck of its young cast is nothing if not admirable.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    May not be great cinema, but it's a guaranteed crowd-pleaser.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    If Casa de los Babys isn't necessarily a fully realized film, it's still a deeply felt glimpse into dizzyingly complex political and psychological forces that shape the most crucial decisions of a woman's life.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Surprisingly nimble and fun to watch, mostly thanks to the magnificent dogs Hoffman has found to portray his lead characters, and thanks to the actors he cast as the animals' voices.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    It succeeds, with a big, false-eyelashed wink.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Slow going, but it provides an absorbing glimpse of a rarely seen side of Chinese life.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    The movie's sweet, gentle nature may lack the subtle irony of the "Toy Storys" and "Shreks" of the world, but parents won't be bored.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Becker handles the film's comedy with fluency.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    A perfect example of a really good not-great movie, the kind that would be classified as a guilty pleasure were it not executed with guilt-free honesty and good nature.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    A amusing trifle that might fit somewhere between "The Big Lebowski" and "Intolerable Cruelty"; for those expecting "Fargo," it's no "Fargo."
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    If "13 Going on 30" isn't exactly original, it's still reasonably cool.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    A tame, fitfully amusing and generally inoffensive romantic comedy.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    The power of this quiet little film lies in the lyricism of its images of life on Bangladesh's waterways and in its towns...and in the naturalistic performances from its cast of mostly nonprofessional actors.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Audiences craving big, gooey over-the-top romance have their must-see summer movie in The Notebook.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Most important, the film has a terrific supporting character in St. Marie herself, portrayed by the real Canadian island of Harrington Harbour (pop. 300).
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    In Fahrenheit 9/11, Moore largely stays out of the picture, and the film is the better for it. But otherwise his style hasn't changed.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Watching Spacek dance around the bedroom, slowly loosening up while Laura Nyro plays, is one of the joys of this cinematic season.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Garden State features some wonderful performances, chief among them an engaging, even courageous turn from Natalie Portman.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    It's at once too restrained and too perversely funny to have emanated from the play-it-big-but-play-it-safe sensibilities of Hollywood, U.S.A.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    A wartime epic in the most flamboyant, operatic tradition of the genre.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    A shorter version of which was shown last year in a series of house parties sponsored by the anti-Bush organizations MoveOn.org and the Center for American Progress -- Greenwald marshals dozens of impeccably credentialed witnesses to debunk the case made for going to war.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    The main reason to see Criminal isn't for the mental workout it might offer but simply to watch these two appealing performers act and act and act.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Offers audiences a real rarity in theaters these days: a good, honest cry.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    A lucid, emotionally affecting portrait not just of one man but of his times.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    A movie that longs for a return to a cinema that, rather than marketing, merchandise and corporate synergy, is about the mysteries that flicker to life after the lights go down.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Artfully structured, combining old-school MGM-type musical numbers with occasional postmodern flourishes to keep the narrative moving.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    An often lively investigation of the social forces that produced the original movie and made it an unlikely political shibboleth in the ongoing culture wars.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    It Works.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Schorr's endearing little movie gets under your skin much like the music it celebrates.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    A joy to watch.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    A lively, engrossing documentary
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Smart, absorbing movie.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Full of heart-rending moments, in which people of good faith search for answers to what, in the end, remain painfully irreconcilable questions.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Dollenmayer has managed to transform a sad sack into an indie screen goddess.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    A poignant portrait of one woman who has loved and lost, and another who never had a love to lose.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    These two generate real, slow-burning rapport, so that you're still pulling for them even during a gratingly preposterous climax.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    The appeal of The Skeleton Key lies not in its plot but in its attention to detail, and the way director Iain Softley (still on probation for "K-PAX," but nevertheless the guy who did "Backbeat") luxuriates in the deeply textured sights and sounds of Louisiana.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    It's the moral journey of Nolte's character that is the real story in Clean, but Assayas instead focuses on the manipulative habits of an addict, resulting in a mannered study of narcissism and self-pity.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Until those final moments, Flightplan succeeds admirably, both as a sophisticated psychological thriller and as an example of, if not great art, then superb craftsmanship.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    It has its own subversive power, as it elevates one family's struggle for working-class survival and valorizes a woman of simple faith and inner strength.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    By turns fascinating, puzzling and troubling -- a deeply felt account of the varieties of religious experience but also a thoroughly uncritical apologia for fanaticism.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    If Tucker's road map often feels a little too confining and the screwball comedy too contrived, he can take credit for introducing viewers to a character they have almost certainly never met before.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Brokeback Mountain possesses handsome and sympathetic lead players, magnificent scenery, heartbreaking melodrama, righteousness and cultural import. But as a testament to the importance of following one's passion, it's devoid of one crucial thing: passion.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Humor and warmth abound in Mrs. Henderson Presents.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Fun With Dick and Jane has lived up to its title: It's fun, and that's fine.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    You won't be disappointed, and you will be deeply, quietly moved.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    A briskly moving, deeply engaging 40-minute documentary.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    With surprisingly good production values and sly, underhanded wit, Willmott never tips his hand, steadily guiding the satire to a genuinely stunning, back-to-reality conclusion.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Bekmambetov handles these narrative bumps with ease, infusing even the hoariest -- and goriest -- of horror movie cliches with equal parts macabre fascination and jaunty humor. The film lives up to its hype with a style, swagger and substance that will appeal not just to the fanboys (and girls) but to their uninitiated friends as well.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Like "Winter Soldier," Sir! No Sir! will surely reopen old wounds, as the Vietnam War -- like the Civil War 100 years before -- refuses to die. But hawks and doves alike should be grateful to Zeiger for preserving a fascinating piece of American cultural history.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    By turns funny, affecting tale.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Abrams keeps the action clicking along in 5/8 time, and Cruise is at his scowling/smiling best as he jumps, shoots and leaves. (See Tom run! Run, Tom, run!) Best is Philip Seymour Hoffman as the baddie; the film's best sequence features him playing Cruise playing him at a swank party in Vatican City.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    The Australian director John Hillcoat makes an audacious, unsettling American feature debut with The Proposition, a revisionist western that brings its own brand of sanguinary honesty to the genre.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Follows the youngsters over the course of a tumultuous year, during which time Cuesta and screenwriter Anthony Cipriano succeed in making the audience care desperately whether they're okay and whether the adults in their lives do the right thing. The lingering question is why that should be so improbable.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Creadon and his editor, Douglas Blush, add verve to an otherwise talky exercise by cutting Wordplay as if it were a puzzle itself, with Across and Down camera moves and blocks of black space. A visual pun altogether worthy of those being filled in on screen.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    The film ultimately becomes too contrived to be anything but a fleeting diversion, but kudos to these emerging filmmakers for daring to make something a little bit different and, for the most part, intriguing.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    At a time when the country is engaged in fresh debates about the fragile relationship between privacy and national security, this particular chapter seems worth revisiting.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Music video director Simon Brand makes an impressively taut debut with Unknown, a nifty little psychological crime thriller that suggests a "Treasure of the Sierra Madre" for the postindustrial age.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Purists will howl at the liberties Shainberg has taken with the facts, but there's a bravery to Fur, an uncompromising commitment to its narrow focus -- of one woman's creative birth -- that rhymes with Arbus's own artistic courage.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Bobby, even if it suffers from a few silly scenes, gets more right than it does wrong.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Family Law never really gets to the nitty-gritty of the Perelmans' fraught relationship, instead maintaining a gently ironic distance that, while admirable in its restraint, ultimately lacks emotional fire.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    It's a fun ride, and the big payoff -- that history turns out to be way cooler than its reputation suggests -- is even more gratifying. Bully!
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    No one can deny the powerful reality that weaves its way through Bamako.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Clocking in at two hours-plus, Glastonbury at times gives viewers the impression that they're slogging through the three-day plunge into mud, music and madness themselves. But for all the posers with light sticks and piercings, there are moments of Dada-esque beauty, not to mention some great music.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    There's nothing wrong with the moral of The Ultimate Gift's story; in fact there's everything right about it. But director Michael O. Sajbel too often succumbs to movie-of-the-week sentimentality and starchy pacing. Still, Breslin's captivating performance reminds you why she was recently nominated for an Oscar.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Binder has set a difficult bar -- to make a funny, sad, original movie about the healing power of not necessarily healing -- and he just manages to clear it.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    An animated feature (showing in 3-D in select theaters), has a couple of clever tricks that make it worth wearing those dumb, uncomfortable glasses. But this would be as delightful and attractive a production without the gimcrackery.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Often possesses the gimlet-eyed wit of "The Player" or the mock docs of Christopher Guest.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    White delivers another weirdly dark-but-funny story.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Hot Fuzz deploys the same mix of genre conventions, slapstick and old-school British humor that made "Shaun of the Dead" such a dumb-but-good romp.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Paris, je t'aime builds into something quite wonderful.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    It's cool but not too cool, and cute but not too cute. A neat trick considering its overexposed avian cast.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Manages to navigate the era of cellphones and Mean Girls with retro nostalgia and wholesomeness, making it a rare girl-powered outing for tweens in an otherwise guy-centric summer.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Viewers are urged to grab an aisle seat, the better to dance when the music moves them -- as it surely will.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    A taut, meticulously crafted police procedural.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    At a time when the action genre has come to be dominated by sleek, matte surfaces and set-'em-and-forget-'em computerized effects, Live Free or Die Hard seeks to remind viewers of the simple, nostalgic pleasures of watching stuff get blown up and bad guys get smoked.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Harrowing, controlled and diabolically self-assured, Joshua leaves filmgoers teetering on their own emotional precipice, wondering just where pathos ends and pathology begins.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    A star isn't born in El Cantante as much as it's reconfirmed. She's still here, and she's still got it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Stardust has it all: sweetness, magic, lusty wenches, evil witches, tankards of mead, a gay pirate.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Christopher Mintz-Plasse steals the movie in his screen debut as a nerd di tutti nerds, a kid whose fake I.D. reads "McLovin."
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Everyone is given their due and dignity in this funny, sexy, humanist film that, if it is a chick flick, gives the genre a good name.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    The Darjeeling Limited"has its charms, chief of which is watching three terrific actors evince with unforced ease the rewards and resentments of brotherhood.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Phoenix is an arresting presence on screen, but don't expect any "Departed"-esque fast talk from Wahlberg, who is oddly inert in a role that should crackle with brotherly ambivalence.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    See Darfur Now, and you won't read the daily news the same way again.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    The Life of Reilly pays fitting homage to a man who deserves to be remembered for much more than just trading double-entendres with Brett Somers on "The Match Game."
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    It should be required viewing before going into a supermarket, McDonald's or your very own refrigerator.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Must-see viewing for anyone who thinks of Christmas as just a mall and its night visitors.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Cage is back in crackling good form in National Treasure: Book of Secrets.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Smarter and more poignant than the average chick flick.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    The films of Michel Gondry aren't for everyone, but viewers who vibe to his playful, cerebral, wildly imaginative sensibility might get a kick out of Be Kind Rewind.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    The film's flaws are nothing compared with the pleasures it offers, chiefly in its unapologetic pursuit of old-fashioned sweetness and romance.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    An interlocking ensemble piece in the tradition of "Crash" and "Babel," but with welcome dashes of whimsy and magical realism.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Even as the derivative roots of Nim's Island are clearly visible, kids will no doubt vicariously enjoy Nim's adventures and Edenic existence. And how refreshing, for once, to see a girl embark on derring-do that, in Nim's own words, makes her the hero of her own story.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Uma Thurman delivers a mesmerizing performance in The Life Before Her Eyes, a film that, once seen and fully digested, exerts the same haunting pull as the shattering events it chronicles.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    It's less a movie than a delivery system for sensory pleasures, sunny romance and designer-label stuff that in real life would result in diabetic shock (or at least a ruined credit rating).
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    The result is a classic comic-book hero quest that, while not entirely novel, hews to its own rules and conventions with dignity and artfulness.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    With its pounding, bloody violence, foul-mouthed language and putrid worldview, Wanted isn't comic book-y on a par with "Iron Man" or "The Incredible Hulk." Rather it's an example of revenge of the nerds at its nastiest and most vulgar.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Whether they're navigating a recently flooded Prague or the pristine waters of a Tuscan swimming pool, the fiends and angels who populate Beauty in Trouble are like so many scorpions explaining why they sting the fabled frog trying to help them: "It's my nature."
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Argento and Aattou deliver appropriately outsize performances to fit the movie's sense of extravagant escapism, and Claude Sarraute delivers a slyly witty performance as the elderly lady carried away by Ryno's Scheherazade-like tale.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    One of the great strengths of CSNY is how skillfully it deflects criticism of "four balding hippie millionaires" taking to the stage to criticize American politics; the film is peppered with excerpts from some of the tour's earliest and nastiest critics.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Like the mix tapes that obsess its main characters, Nick & Norah's Infinite Playlist builds into something of infectious joy.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    With its urgent post-9/11 context and often brutal violence, it seems off-key to describe Body of Lies as a nifty political thriller, but that's what it is.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    It's impossible to watch Defiance without experiencing a vicarious thrill of resistance and revenge.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    The Express finesses a cinematic hat trick: It's entertaining, deeply moving and genuinely important.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    The result is a vivid portrait, not just of one unforgettable young man but also of a country in transition.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Save Me is a particularly flattering showcase for Gant, best known for his work on the TV show "Queer as Folk" and ready for a big-screen breakout.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Exudes genuine appeal, thanks to director Kenny Ortega's brilliant choreography and a gifted cast.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Okay, the concept for the movie is admittedly lame, but there's absolutely nothing wrong with watching a passel of adorable pooches wrinkle their brows and bark while human voices come out of their mouths.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Combines the derring-do of classic adventure tales with far more serious issues of moral agency. And it serves as a haunting reminder to seek joy and beauty, even in the depths of despair.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Bernhard Schlink's highly regarded novel "The Reader" receives a graceful, absorbing screen adaptation by director Stephen Daldry.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Just when you begin to think you know who the cat and mouse really are, in steps Viola Davis to steal not just her scene but the entire movie from Streep.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Winds up being a touching portrait of that rarity in the movies: a recognizably human couple with recognizably human problems and quirks.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Thanks to an accomplished cast, anchored by Elsner and Wepper, and observant filmmakers, very little in Cherry Blossoms is lost in translation.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    The compulsively watchable Owen makes for an ideal leading man of both action and angst. The film's eye-popping set piece, a shootout at the Guggenheim Museum, is an extravagantly choreographed valentine to philistines everywhere.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Features a handsome production and terrific performances.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    The movie's chief value is to preserve Phoenix at the height of his wary physical grace, which recalls a young Marlon Brando.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Hollywood loves the heroics of good intentions, but this movie is just as interested in the road to hell.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    But by far the most powerful element is N'Dour's lone voice, a thing of high, pure beauty that feels at once ancient and new. When he sings, an otherwise earnestly conventional film becomes a vehicle of incantatory power.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    It's as predictable and comforting as a Happy Meal, but it must be said that The Proposal manages to elicit some genuinely amusing moments.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    If not always coherent, at least compelling.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    May not be for everyone, but filmgoers tuned in to its particular, perverse frequency will find much to value in its bent sense of humor and compassion.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Like Gervais, the audience wants to see a struggle, which here comes down to whether unvarnished honesty or random acts of compassionate deceit will win the day. That alone makes for entertainingly high stakes.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 Ann Hornaday
    Arriving on the nastier heels of the horror comedy "Jennifer's Body," Whip It plays like that movie's more wholesome twin, delivering the same jolt of anarchic guerrilla-girl empowerment, only with a far less threatening disposition.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    The Road possesses undeniable sweep and a grim kind of grandeur, but it ultimately plays like a zombie movie with literary pretensions.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Content to be sparkly when it should be sharp-edged and shrewd; it has the potential to roar like a lion, but instead it lays lambs at our feet.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    The jittery, scattershot camerawork of Greengrass's longtime cinematographer, Barry Ackroyd, was used far more coherently in Kathryn Bigelow's Oscar-winning "The Hurt Locker," and the constant blurry close-ups of computer screens and street-level scrums lose their power with each successive cut.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    At its best, The Last Station vividly illustrates the enduring Russian gift for iconography, whether spiritual, secular or something in between.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    The best reason to see 44 Inch Chest is simply to behold some of the finest actors working today, especially Winstone -- who can embody winsomeness and menace in one sweaty, unkempt glance -- and the woefully underemployed Dillane.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Resourceful, if occasionally forced, teen melodrama.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Not nearly as accomplished narratively as it is visually.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    A tough movie to love.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Dinner for Schmucks has already raised hackles in the Yiddish-speaking community for the breathtakingly offensive epithet in its title (and it's not "dinner"). But it turns out that this comedy of humiliation, starring Paul Rudd and Steve Carell, isn't nearly as off-putting as it might have been.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Eat Pray Love finally settles into its own cinematic destiny as an attractive escapist love story, in which the romance is more with the I than with the guy.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    A super-stoked action thriller
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Epitomizes the kind of somber, aesthetically refined and morally engaged film that commands deep respect without inspiring much affection.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    A well-made, excruciating exercise in containment and sustained suspense. It's a breakout moment for Reynolds. Is it a fun hour and a half? No. But it succeeds within its own straitened contours. It's an intriguing squirm. Now, please get me outta here.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    RED
    Unlike "Wild Hogs" or last summer's "The Expendables," this adaptation of the "Red" graphic novel series gets into a cool, sophisticated swing.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    All Good Things is creepy and weird and sad, and little else.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Burlesque delivers eyeful after eyeful of rapid-fire opulence and spectacle. But its most memorable sight is the indelible image of one star taking flight, and another triumphantly staying put.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Due Date isn't pretty; in fact, it gets kind of ugly. But, at least in the eyes of certain beholders, therein lies its peculiar, bent beauty.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    It's the kind of movie that succeeds as a culmination of moments that ring true and sweet.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    While qualifying as the most gorgeously appointed and finely detailed version of the novel so far, still lacks the element of essential fire to make it come fully, even subversively, to life.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    In The Conspirator, Wright announces in no uncertain terms that she is back and more than ready for her close-up.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    At its best, The Tree of Life makes the viewer lean forward, eager to enter Malick's own dreamy, poetic consciousness. At worst, it leads to the vague feeling that we're listening to the meanderings of someone who's not sure we're smart enough to keep up.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    All too often the plot feels calculated rather than organic, the result of a time-tested formula rather than genuine innovation.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    If Kunis gets the showier role in Friends With Benefits, Timberlake proves a quietly charming stalking horse, finally claiming and fully owning the spotlight with a hilarious homage to the 1990s rap duo Kriss Kross.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    A loving throwback to the classic westerns and sci-fi adventures of yore, this celebration of two of cinema's most revered genres doesn't stint in lavishing their most cherished conventions with even-handed affection and respect.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Hip, lurid and improbably lovable, The Guard is easily the best guy-love comedy of the summer, with Cheadle and Gleeson's riffs and repartee tumbling back and forth as if they've been trading lies over Guinness forever.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    One Day often seems too tame for its own good, as if its spirited protagonists were censoring themselves in deference to a PG-13 rating.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    The Ides of March is cynical when, with political figures and institutions at all-time lows in public opinion, cynicism is the last thing we need; worse, that cynicism isn't spiked with any new or incisive insight.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Footloose never needed to be dragged into the 21st century, but Brewer has made it look and sound a little bit more like the real world.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    An improbably satisfying action comedy.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Nivola and Breslin make a terrific mismatched pair in a film that often resembles a mash-up of "Crazy Heart" and Sofia Coppola's "Somewhere," which may account for why it too often feels derivative and contrived.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    There's a place in the movies for wish fulfillment, no doubt, including the wish for it all to be over.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo may want it both ways, getting its tawdry kicks while tsk-tsking those who deliver them in real life, but Mara's bristling, unbridled performance gives the film the ballast it needs to pull off that curious, undeniably engrossing, balancing act.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Sadly, Herge isn't around to see The Adventures of Tintin, Spielberg's crisp, richly rendered animated adaptation, which could be counted as both a success and a failure. Spielberg has brought Tintin to the big screen all right, but not quite to life.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    If viewers are left feeling just as impotent as many of the characters, that may be precisely what Jolie intended for a film that asks nothing more of its audience than to bear witness.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    A surprisingly lush, endearing little film, in which a swelling sense of romanticism thoroughly banishes even the most far-fetched improbabilities.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    If the series's legions of fans miss a detail here or a sub-plot there, they'll still recognize its bones and sinew, especially in Jennifer Lawrence's eagle-eyed heroine Katniss Everdeen.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    This intimate, straightforward, often wrenching portrait of five families dealing with bullying and its aftermath doesn't hold many surprises at a time when such campaigns as "It Gets Better" and special programming on kids' cable networks are bringing the issue to the fore.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    An all-star revue of some of the most physically stunning actors working in Hollywood, Think Like a Man is a pleasure if only on a purely sensory level.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    I liked The Five-Year Engagement, and then I didn't, and then I did.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    The conflicts, magic spells, chase sequences and reconciliations feel strangely by-the-book for a studio so well known for throwing the book out entirely.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    The good news is that Garfield and Stone whip up a warm, convincing froth as two teenagers caught up in a beguiling case of puppy love. The not-so-great news is that by "reboot," the studio means taking audiences once again through every step of Peter's transformation into Spider-Man.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Savages is a B-movie striving for an A-plus, a decadently energetic summer escape with bloody action, bold visuals and bodacious attitude to burn.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    For a movie so bent on skewering illusions, Ruby Sparks ultimately can't entirely let go of its own.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    While Sparkle doesn't give the audience a lasting memory of Houston's voice at its most soaring, it does manage to provide a lingering sense of loss, mixed with celebration and grim irony.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    By bringing so much thought, verve and visual poetry to bear on two neurotics acting out -- rather than on the larger cultural story they anticipate and embody -- The Master turns out to be more of a self-defeating whimper than the big, important bang it could have been.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    While Tom Tykwer, Andy Wachowski and Lana Wachowski haven't necessarily expanded on Mitchell's book, they've done a superlative job making it legible onscreen. Cloud Atlas deserves praise if only for not being the baggy, pretentious disaster it could have been in other hands.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    The problem with Hyde Park on Hudson isn't its suggestion of FDR's dark side. That complexity, and Murray's spot-on portrayal of a man juggling myriad pressures and demands, from petty to momentous, marks one of the film's greatest strengths. It's that Daisy rarely comes into her own as more than the pliant emotional helpmeet to the Great Man.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    For better or worse, though, this adaptation of the mega-hit Broadway musical fits neither description, largely because it lives in that kinda-sorta, okay-not-great, this-worked-that-didn't in-between for which words like "better" and "worse" fall woefully short.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Breathes its own refreshing, occasionally demented, life into that time period, albeit in a pulpy, stylized cinematic language more akin to vampire-hunter cartoonishness than "Lincoln's" more classical reserve.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    If this strikes you as vaguely familiar, you’re right: Disconnect is a computer “Crash.”
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    The result is a movie that, while no classic, can be credited with giving the audience something a bit more substantive than the usual disposable summer fare.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Features one of the best endings in recent movie memory — and as we all know, endings are the hardest. If it takes some predictable twists and turns to get there, well then, accept it and move on.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    A big, lumbering, rock ’em, sock ’em mash-up of metallic heft and hyperbole, a noisy, overproduced disaster flick that sucks its characters and the audience down a vortex of garish visual effects and risibly cartoonish action. And you know what? It’s not bad!
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Computer Chess makes an affecting preservationist plea, in this case for a visual and material culture that, while not objectively beautiful, possessed its own form of buttoned-down passion — before it became obsolete by taking over the world.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    A high-low tension runs through Elysium, not only in the narrative itself, but in Blomkamp’s own cinematic language, which can be lofty one moment and gleefully pulpy the next.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    As admirable as Moors’s oblique style is, though, Blue Caprice doesn’t offer the sense of catharsis or closure, let alone new information, that makes it more than a cold, if disciplined, directorial exercise.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    The wispy premise of Newlyweeds, written and directed by Shaka King, is kept afloat by its attractive, youthfully vital cast (along with some well-timed comic relief by way of some familiar faces).
    • 51 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    A film of modest ambition and workmanlike pacing, it breaks little new ground, either in form or content. Then again, that may be the point.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    You don’t go to The Best Man Holiday to deconstruct its flaws. You go for its myriad, adamantly un-cerebral pleasures.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Everyone hits their marks with gusto and believability in Catching Fire... But the engine of the entire operation is Jennifer Lawrence.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Sensory pleasures abound in Black Nativity, which is grounded by Forest Whitaker and Angela Bassett’s performances as Langston’s strict, God-fearing grandparents.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Buried inside this grab bag of hits and misses is a pretty good point about the descent of television news into a miasma of 24/7 speculation, fluff and, most of all, hype.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    The Wolf of Wall Street remains one-note even at is most outré, an episodic portrait of rapaciousness in which decadence escalates into debauchery escalates into depravity — but, miraculously, not death.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    The Monuments Men often lets the schematic gears show, succumbing to threadbare formula and sentimental cliches rather than taut, sophisticated drama.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    About Last Night may be about Daniel and Debbie, but it’s Hart and Hall who make it worth watching. They take palatable but not exceptional cinematic hay and turn it into comic gold.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Ann Hornaday
    Omar feels as trapped and enmeshed in hopelessness as the vicious political cycle it depicts.

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