For 569 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 31% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 68% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Anthony Lane's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 The Host
Lowest review score: 0 The Da Vinci Code
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 46 out of 569
569 movie reviews
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Anthony Lane
    The casting of Minority Report may be the smartest in the history of Spielberg. [1 July 2002, p. 96]
    • The New Yorker
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Anthony Lane
    The architecture of Pulp Fiction may look skewed and strained, but the decoration is a lot of fun. [10 Oct 1994, p.95]
    • The New Yorker
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Anthony Lane
    This is a leap into grandeur.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Anthony Lane
    The virtues of Jackson's trilogy, thus far, have been pace and astonishment, which is almost the same thing. [6 January 2003, p. 90]
    • The New Yorker
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 Anthony Lane
    The movie that we do have is cogent, lavish, and formidable enough, with a Recchi-like power to frighten and seduce.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Anthony Lane
    Tucked away inside the grandeur, though, and enlivened by jump cuts, is a sharp, not unharrowing story of a father and son, and, amid one's exasperation, there is no mistaking Malick's unfailing ability to grab at glories on the fly.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Anthony Lane
    This movie can hardly help being beautiful, in such a rarefied domain, but what matters is that it never looks merely beautiful. [28 Feb. 2011, p. 81]
    • The New Yorker
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Anthony Lane
    The eye must travel not merely through the earth's crust but backward in time, as well. Indeed, you could argue that Herzog has succeeded in making the world's first movie in 4-D. [2 May 2011, p. 88]
    • The New Yorker
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Anthony Lane
    For all its mayhem, runs like a mad and slightly sad machine, whirring with hints of folly and regret, and the ending, remarkably, makes elegant sense to a degree that eludes most science fictions. How to describe it, without giving anything away? Scrambled, but rare. [1 Oct. 2012, p.84]
    • The New Yorker
    • 95 Metascore
    • 90 Anthony Lane
    The writer and director, Asghar Farhadi, has thus created the perfect antithesis of a crunching disaster flick, such as "2012," which was all boom and no ripple.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Anthony Lane
    On reflection, and despite these cavils, we should bow to The Master, because it gives us so much to revere, starting with the image that opens the film and recurs right up to the end-the turbid, blue-white wake of a ship. There goes the past, receding and not always redeemable, and here comes the future, waiting to churn us up.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Anthony Lane
    Rust and Bone might as well be called "Water and Light"; it glitters and flares with the urge to renew those things - limbs, knuckles, lovemaking, and parental bonds - which are easily fractured and lost.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 90 Anthony Lane
    What makes Amour so strong and clear is that it allows Haneke to anatomize his own severity.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 Anthony Lane
    No
    The best movie ever made about Chilean plebiscites, NO thoroughly deserves its Oscar nomination for Best Foreign Film.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Anthony Lane
    Seldom has our modern taste for the confessional mode been so smartly explored. [20 May 2013, p. 123]
    • The New Yorker
    • 90 Metascore
    • 90 Anthony Lane
    Her
    Sad, kooky, and daunting in equal measure, Her is the right film at the right time.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Anthony Lane
    Henry James, who loved the place, accused himself of "making a mere Rome of words, talking of a Rome of my own which was no Rome of reality." Sorrentino has made a Rome of images, and taken the same risk. But it was worth it. [25 Nov. 2013, p.134]
    • The New Yorker
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Anthony Lane
    The most consuming and most exhausting of its kind since “The Dreamlife of Angels,” fifteen years ago. From the moment when Adèle first catches sight of Emma, on a busy crosswalk, the movie restores your faith in the power of the coup de foudre and yet redoubles your fear of its effect; love, like lightning, can both illuminate and scorch. The problems of two little people, it turns out, do indeed amount to a hill of beans. Some hill. Some beans.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Anthony Lane
    Glazer is nothing if not ambitious; the rough edge of naturalism, on the streets, slices into the more controlled and stylized look of science fiction, and the result seems both to drift and to gather to a point of almost painful intensity.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Anthony Lane
    Birdman, right now, is on the money. In Riggan and the rest of the cast, writhing with the dread of being a nobody but appalled by what it takes to be a somebody, we see not just the acting bug but also the New York bug, the love bug, and, if we’re honest, the life bug, diagnosed as what they are: a seventy-year itch.
    • 100 Metascore
    • 90 Anthony Lane
    The profuse pleasures of Boyhood spring not from amazement but from recognition — from saying, Yes, that’s true, and that feels right, or that’s how it was for me, too.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Anthony Lane
    Thanks to Whiplash, Simmons will lend comfort to those actors who believe that, if they wait long enough, the right role — their role — will come along. Fletcher is such a part.

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