For 588 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 31% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 68% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Anthony Lane's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Wallace & Gromit: The Curse of the Were-Rabbit
Lowest review score: 0 The Da Vinci Code
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 46 out of 588
588 movie reviews
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    It winces with liberal self-chastisement: Redford is surely smart enough to realize, as the professor turns his ire on those who merely chatter while Rome burns, that his movie is itself no better, or more morally effective, than high-concept Hollywood fiddling.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    It makes “Yellow Submarine” look like a miracle of sober narrative.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    No one wants a movie that tiptoes in step with political correctness, yet the willful opposite can be equally noxious, and, as In Bruges barges and blusters its way through dwarf jokes, child-abuse jokes, jokes about fat black women, and moldy old jokes about Americans, it runs the risk of pleasing itself more than its paying viewers.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    A comedy without one foot on the ground is no more than a flight of fancy, as directionless as a balloon; the master clowns of silent cinema knew that, and so does Mr. Fletcher, the gravid elder statesman of this film. As he says to Mike and Jerry, “I appreciate your creativity, but let’s be realistic for a second.” Be kind. Erase.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    A confused, humorless grind.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    Parts of Bangkok Dangerous, far from seeming unfamiliar or freshly stylized, offer nothing that you couldn't catch in an episode of "CSI."
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    The trouble with Blindness is that it’s so preoccupied with shouldering this symbolic weight that it gradually forgets to tell a story--to keep faith with the directives of common sense.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    For those who think of cinema as dramatic roughage, The Reader should prove sufficiently indigestible.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    You do wonder how this commanding actor (Neeson)--who carries so much more conviction than the plot--felt about delivering the line "I'll tear down the Eiffel Tower if I have to."
    • 79 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    What we have here is a fouled-up fairy tale of oppression and empowerment, and it’s hard not to be ensnared by its mixture of rank maleficence and easy reverie. The gap between being genuinely stirred and having your arm twisted, however, is narrower than we care to admit.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    The last third of the movie is as bad as anything I’ve seen this year, with the laughs trailing off, and half of the supporting characters, the zestier ones, being airbrushed from the frame. (What director in his right mind would drop Tina Fey from the proceedings?)
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    What lends the film its grip and its haste is also what makes it unsatisfactory.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    As a journey through Darwin's discoveries, Creation fails, although, given the intricacy and the patience of his working methods, it is hard to imagine how such a film might succeed.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    Say what you like about the feuds of old, they exerted a dynastic thrust that made sense, whereas Leterrier’s magic tricks are the foe of logic; for some reason, the scorpions wind up as friendly transport for our heroes, so why battle them in the first place?
    • 86 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    There are not only glancing moments but whole sequences in this movie when the agony of social embarrassment makes you want to haul the characters to their feet and slap them in the chops.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    It's not the most high-concept movie of the year, or indeed of any other. Due Date is most interesting, and most fearful, when it loiters on the threshold of the homoerotic.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    Feels at once secondhand in its eagerness and unknowing in its scorn.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    Larry Crowne is worryingly light on laughs, yet it never dares to worry too much about the plight of its central figure. [11 & 18 July 2011, p.100]
    • The New Yorker
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    In short, this popular love story isn't much of a story, and falls badly short on love.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    Toss everything you can find, starting with roughly diced plots, into the blender, press "Pulse," and pray: such appears to be the method behind Tower Heist.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    With its restless parade of grainy closeups, the movie is a haze of retro rapture and wishful thinking, and, above all, a lost opportunity. We don't want to hear any more about ancient constitutional crises. We want to watch a three-way with a former King of England, in a bungalow. Madonna, of all people, missed a trick.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    Imagine a different film on a similar theme, with Hubert moved to center stage and García replaced by Pedro Almodóvar, for whom cross-dressers in a Catholic country would be meat and drink. Poor Albert could then retreat into the shadows, where he so evidently belongs, emerging only to pour the wine and clear away the feast.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    The whole thing, shot in the manner of "Masterpiece Theatre," with a flaccid musical score to match, is itself hopelessly antiquated, greeting with very British giggles, and without a trace of honest curiosity, the needs of the women it seeks to honor. [21 May 2012, p.81]
    • The New Yorker
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    Throughout Sinister, the rooms remain darker than crypts, whether at breakfast or dinnertime, and the sound design causes everything in the house to moan and groan in consort with the hero's worrisome quest. I still can't decide what creaks the most: the floors, the doors, the walls, the dialogue, the acting, or the fatal boughs outside.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    I hesitate to ask, but did anyone actually tell McClane, before he arrived, that the Cold War is over?
    • 72 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    You wind up feeling doubly bullied -- first by the brutal enormity of the set pieces, and then by the emotional arm-twisting of the downtimes. [20 May 2013, p.122]
    • The New Yorker
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    However mystifying, or downright boring, you find the result, rest assured that the Refn faithful will swoon. Peace be with them.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    And so, as the solemnity of the enterprise is frittered away, you feel moved to ask: what is this film for?
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    Suffice to say that even he (one of our finest actors) is trapped by the miasma of unsubtlety that creeps into the film and causes all involved to lose their professional bearings. [5 May 2014, p.84]
    • The New Yorker
    • 54 Metascore
    • 40 Anthony Lane
    Sparks like that are scattered through, and yet the sad fact is that Jersey Boys is a mess. Parts of it feel half-finished.

Top Trailers