For 565 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 31% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 68% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Anthony Lane's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 The Kid with a Bike
Lowest review score: 0 The Da Vinci Code
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 46 out of 565
565 movie reviews
    • 77 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    A scruffy, thick-grained piece of work, shot in thirty days and scrawled not with luscious coloring but with the tense and inky markings of a society that is fighting to keep its reputation for togetherness, and wondering what that reputation is still worth. [18 & 25 Feb 2002. p. 199]
    • The New Yorker
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    The movie, with spiderlike timidity, scuttles into a corner and freezes. [13 May 2002, p. 96]
    • The New Yorker
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    There are two drawbacks here. One is a shortage of superior zombies, although where one goes to rent extra zombies I have no idea...Second, we have a serious shortage of fright. [30 June 2003, p. 102]
    • The New Yorker
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Even if you closed your eyes -- a tempting option -- you would still know that you were in the hollering presence of pain. The story is undiluted dread. [10 March 2003, p. 94]
    • The New Yorker
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    The good news is that Matchstick Men is saved. Not by the plot, which entails a con so long that you can spot it coming a mile off, but by the presence of Alison Lohman. [22 September 2003, p. 202]
    • The New Yorker
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    What fun there is derives from the smart editing (Rodriguez did his own cutting, and he's quicker on the draw than most of the pistol-packers) and from Antonio Banderas, who, stepping neatly into the Mariachi's boots, lends irony and calm, and even a trace of sweetness, to a nothing role.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    All we are left with, in essence, is an unlikely love affair, performed by two actors so remorselessly skilled that, by the end, you can't see the love for the skill. [3 November 2003, p. 104]
    • The New Yorker
    • 73 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    As a whole, Shattered Glass is carefully constructed, intently played, and shot with creepy calm. It is also, by a considerable margin, the most ridiculous movie I have seen this year. [3 November 2003, p. 104]
    • The New Yorker
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    In short, the Sheridan of In America wants us to pity his characters for the rough ride that they endure, yet at the same time he traps them inside a bubble of the picturesque and the outlandish. Even if you like this movie, you have to ask: What has it done to deserve its title? [1 December 2003, p. 118]
    • The New Yorker
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    The hero's restlessness infects the rest of the movie; the story feels febrile and unhappy, and Allen seems to take his dissatisfaction out on his helpless characters--especially the women.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    There are many unanswered questions here (why, for instance, does Pitt's Grim Reaper seem semi-retarded?), not to mention unintended spasms of comedy; in the end, however, they all get swallowed up in the mush.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    LaBute's attempt to follow in the footsteps of Restoration comedy is undercut by the fact that his dialogue is only fitfully funny, and you can't help but feel soured by the flat, ritualistic look of the action. The one enlivening performance comes, surprisingly, from Jason Patric.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Everybody in and around this movie is trying too hard...After half an hour, we realized that, instead of enjoying a funny film, we were being lightly bullied into finding fun where precious little exists. [5 April 2004, p. 89]
    • The New Yorker
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    The few good jokes (most of them courtesy of the Pharaoh's high priests, voiced by Martin Short and Steve Martin) are swallowed up in this humorless epic.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Shyamalan remains as coolly unstirred by sex as he was in his previous movies--an astounding indifference, given the historical entwining of eros and fright. Even more bizarre is the gradual draining of humor from his work; the anatomy of horror demands a tongue in the cheek to go with the baring of teeth, but much of The Village is a proud and sullen affair.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Much of the film glides past with a slightly purposeless elegance. Astounding landscapes rise and fall away; enticing women glance and dance and disappear.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    The ideas behind Enduring Love may be fascinating, but they don’t play; they sulk.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Hearts and Minds, which gives no clue that atrocities were committed by the other side, and which allows Davis to cut from a rampaging football game, back home, to the Tet offensive, will be a lesson to anybody who thinks that Michael Moore invented the notion of documentary as blunderbuss.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    There are too many rancors--hatred of life, hatred of others, hatred of their means to happiness--to contend with here, and the loveliness of the verse beats fruitlessly against them, as if against a wharf.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    The Crudup of "Almost Famous" was both hairier and more appealing than the tortured womanizer of World Traveler. Couldn't Cal have just stayed home, grown a mustache, and called his dad on the phone? [22 & 29 April 2002, p. 209]
    • The New Yorker
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    The line between the dispassionate and the dull can be ominously faint, and when Rohmer kicks off his film with ten or fifteen minutes of solid anecdotal chat, you fear for the stamina of the audience. [13 May 2002, p. 96]
    • The New Yorker
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    "Deep Throat" bore an X certificate. Inside Deep Throat is an NC-17. Neither is suitable for grownups.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    All movie adaptations of Nabokov fall short, by definition, but this one is the most graceful failure so far.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    What binds and clads the new movie most thoroughly, however, is not storytelling but the high pressure of atmosphere.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Just creepy and unsavory at moments, but pleased to be so.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    The result is clever, and the narrative twistings keep you on your toes, but there's just one hitch: it ain't funny.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    How can one defend this prolonged mumble of a motion picture? Well, some of the motion has a hypnotizing grace.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    Much of the dialogue is scissor-sharp--you would expect no less of Marber, who wrote "Closer"--but he is up against blunt and obvious material.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    What ensues is a devout communal effort, tricked out with various hops through time and space, to make us forget that it was a piece of theatre in the first place. Needless to say, the attempt is in vain.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Anthony Lane
    The movie takes time to warm up, it weakens into soppiness at the end, and the game itself, if you think it through, makes very little sense.

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