For 743 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 30% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 68% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.5 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Anthony Lane's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 63
Highest review score: 100 E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial
Lowest review score: 0 The Da Vinci Code
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 50 out of 743
743 movie reviews
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    The main problem with War for the Planet of the Apes is that, although it rouses and overwhelms, it ain’t much fun.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    British director Michael Winterbottom has made his best and most driven picture to date. [22 September 2003, p. 202]
    • The New Yorker
    • 90 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    Jacques Audiard’s film, which lasts two and a half hours, maintains an unflagging urgency, stalling only when the double-dealing grows too dense.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    The sense of period, of ungainly English pride, is funny and acute, but the movie mislays its sense of wit as the girls grow up.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    The weirdness of Truth — and, I fear, its involuntary comic value — arises from a disparity between the sparse and finicky minutiae of the narrative and the somewhat bouffant style of the presentation.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    The result, though corny at times, treads close to madness and majesty alike, and nobody but Gibson could have made it.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    Few movies this year will be more likely to molest your sleep.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    The result is an unorthodox blend of courtroom drama and old-style weepie, and somehow it comes off. [23 Dec 1993]
    • The New Yorker
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    Beauty and the Beast is delectably done; when it’s over, though, and when the spell is snapped, it melts away, like cotton candy on the tongue.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    A trim thriller with an enviable lack of grandeur. [21 Jan. 2013, p.79]
    • The New Yorker
    • 36 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    A short, meaningless blast of fun from Disney.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    The result is a sad suburban pastoral, a strain of film you don't see much of, or not enough; it may feel somewhat stretched, and Rush's additions to Carver barely push it past ninety minutes, but anything hectic or hasty would have spoiled the mood. [16 May 2011, p. 132]
    • The New Yorker
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    What the novels leave us with, and what emerges more fitfully from this film, as if in shafts of sunlight, is the growing realization that, although our existence is indisputably safer, softer, cleaner, and more dependable than the lives led by Captain Aubrey and his men, theirs were in some immeasurable way better. [17 November 2003, p. 172]
    • The New Yorker
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    Precisely thirty-six times more interesting than “The Girl on the Train.” Where the conceit of that movie feels timid, cooked up, and culturally thin, Anvari’s is nourished by a near-traumatic sense of history, and, in terms of feminist pluck, Rashidi’s presence, in the leading role, is both gutsier and more plausible than the combined efforts of all the main performers in Taylor’s film.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    Even as this fine documentary unveils the "mystery woman," as she once described herself, it remains intent on the molding of her myth. [31 March 2014, p.80]
    • The New Yorker
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    This is not life imitating art. This is art going to bed with life and staying there for the rest of the afternoon. [31 March 2014, p.81]
    • The New Yorker
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    To my eyes, the whole thing past in a blur of fabulous collage. [2 September 2002, p. 152]
    • The New Yorker
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    The Darjeeling Limited works best when the level of artifice is at its highest and most overt.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    There is no narrator; rather, we are invited to eavesdrop on--or to get an earful from--such figures as Hassan Ibrahim, a jovial reporter with Al Jazeera, and Samir Khader, one of the network’s senior producers. [24 May 2004, p. 97]
    • The New Yorker
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    The drama is stuck with that ethical rigor, and we are left with a near-heretical irony: thanks to this admiring tribute, our hero gets top billing at last, but was he not more beguiling, somehow, as a legendary figure in the shadows?
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    I am casting no aspersions on the director when I say that The Saddest Music in the World is a work of manic depression. The mania is there in the frenzied editing, the inability to concentrate on a detail for more than a few seconds; and the depression is there in the forcible lowering of spirits. [10 May 2004, p. 107]
    • The New Yorker
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    As “Eight Days a Week” springs from color to black-and-white, and as frenzied action is intercut with stills, we get a delicious sense of doubleness. The Beatles now belong to an honored past, stuck there like an obelisk, and yet here they are, alive—busting out all over, time and time again. Yeah, yeah, yeah.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    The writer and director, Paul King, scatters the tale with handfuls of eccentric charm, first in the forest and then in the home of the Browns. At one point, borrowing freely from Wes Anderson, he frames it as a living doll’s house, with each member of the family hard at work or play in a different room.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    When I first saw the movie, at a festival, it wavered on the brink of the precious. That changed on a second viewing. Most of Francofonia now seems tender, stirring, and imperilled.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    Along with Guillermo del Toro and Peter Jackson, Burton is one of the few magi who know what can be dredged up, even now, from the cauldron of special effects. [21 May 2012, p.80]
    • The New Yorker
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    By temperament, Abrams is more of a Spielbergian than he is a Lucasite. His visual wit may not be, as it is for Spielberg, a near-magical reflex, but nor is Abrams suckered into bombast by technological zeal, as Lucas has been, and the new movie, as an act of pure storytelling, streams by with fluency and zip. To sum up: “Star Wars” was broke, and it did need fixing. And here is the answer.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    Against all expectations, you approach Rabbit Hole with a heavy heart and leave with a lighter one.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    Meanwhile, everyone in the theatre is thinking: Given that I paid good money to learn about the world’s most frightening cocaine king, why am I watching a movie about the world’s most stupid Canadian?
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    Screenwriter Richard LaGravenese and director Clint Eastwood have turned out something sombre and restrained -- almost, in fact, good (though it's too long).
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Anthony Lane
    Of the many heists and grabs that litter the movie, none is as blatant as the deft, irrepressible manner in which Ferguson, displaying a light smile and a brisk way with a knife, steals the show. Poor Tom Cruise. He can’t even steal a kiss.

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