For 720 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 30% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 68% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Anthony Lane's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial
Lowest review score: 0 The Da Vinci Code
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 50 out of 720
720 movie reviews
    • 90 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    Imagine my relief when Bob, Helen, and the kids, for all the nicety of their emotions, turned out to be--if I can risk a word that may be taboo in Pixar land--cartoons. Long may it stay that way.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    At last, a good big film. The legacy of the summer, thus far, has been jetsam: moribund movies that lie there, bloated and beached, gasping to break even. But here is something angry and alive: Elysium.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    Though Lee still can't resist a fancy visual trick from time to time, Clockers is, at its best—in its compound of the jaunty and the depressing—his ripest work to date.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    There is no whodunit here — the horror is plain in the opening shots — and the how is presented with great restraint, but the why remains veiled and mysterious long after the film has ended.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    Consume with great caution, and with joy.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    Peter Jackson has not really made a movie of The Lord of the Rings; he has sprung clear of it to forge something new. He has drawn a deep breath, and taken the plunge. [5 January 2004, p. 89]
    • The New Yorker
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    The monologue that Goldblum delivers there, grand with illusion and larded with mouthfuls of canapes, is entirely delicious -- roguish and absurd, but lending the film a zest that it was in danger of losing. [17 March 2014, p.79]
    • The New Yorker
    • 61 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    Enemy may crawl and infuriate, and, boy, does Villeneuve get rid of the grin. But the film sticks with you, like a dreadful dream or a spider in the bedclothes. Shake it off, and it's still there. [17 March 2014, p.78]
    • The New Yorker
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    About Elly both clutches us tight and shuts us out, adding wave upon wave of secrets and lies.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    There aren't many performers who can deliver the fullness of heart that such a plot demands, but Winslet is one of them. [22 March 2004, p. 102]
    • The New Yorker
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    The beautiful joke of Factotum is that Dillon is nobility itself.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    The practiced calmness of Kore-eda’s approach is such that you barely notice the speed at which he tugs the plot along and flips from one setting to the next.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    Anderson's great gift is to catch the generations as they intersect. [4 & 11 June 2012, p 132]
    • The New Yorker
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    Less fruitful is the casting of Michelle Pfeiffer as May's older cousin, the mysterious Countess Olenska, with whom Archer falls hopelessly in love. With her silly blond curls, Pfeiffer looks more plaintive than the dark exotic of Wharton's imagination.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    Oddly, the effect of that imbalance is not just to heighten the charm of the film but to render it more credible: the course of true memory never did run smooth.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    There are times when the movie's entertainment value verges on the scandalous. [4 November 2002, p. 110]
    • The New Yorker
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    No male director would have put so much as a toe inside this trouble zone, although Kent does borrow a helpful domestic hint from “Shaun of the Dead”: rather than vanquish our worst nightmare, why not tame it, lock it away, and hope?
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    The dichotomy turns out to be a false one: whether you revile him or genuflect before him, you are still implying that the guy demands and deserves our fascination. What Sorkin and Boyle have to offer is not a warts-and-all portrait but the suggestion that there is something heroic about a wart.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    The result feels, like Shakespeare's play, at once ancient and dangerously new.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    Pan
    Wright’s best film so far, livelier and more disloyal to its source than “Atonement” or “Pride and Prejudice” — crams without a care. The outcome is that increasing rarity, a proper children’s film; even the tears are well earned.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    What we glean from Belvaux's trilogy is the reassurance (rare on film, with its terror of inattention) that people are both important and unimportant, and that heroes and leading ladies, in life as in art, can fade into extras before our eyes. [Note: From a review of the entire trilogy.] [2 February 2004, p.94]
    • The New Yorker
    • 88 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    I certainly came out of Nobody Knows feeling numb; only later, reflecting on the fact that the movie was inspired by a true story, did it occur to me that the numbness could have been deliberate, and that what suffused this picture was a mist of anger.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    Best of all -- and the only thing that has really made me laugh at the movies this year -- is a lengthy scene in which Coogan, inspired by the landscape, confesses his desire to star in a traditional costume drama. [13 & 20 June 2011, p. 128]
    • The New Yorker
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    To some degree, “Hidden” is a cat-and-mouse thriller, the only problem being that mouse and cat insist on swapping roles.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    It's a film that you need to see, not a film that you especially want to.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    Linklater barely puts a foot wrong, and he shows that a movie about happiness can be cogent and robust, rather than sappy or wispy; and yet, for all its gambolling mischief, Everybody Wants Some!! leaves us with plenty to rue.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    What is most winning about Distant is that it can peer past the grief and find a scrap of comedy. [15 March 2004, p. 154]
    • The New Yorker
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    Inherent Vice is not only the first Pynchon movie; it could also, I suspect, turn out to be the last. Either way, it is the best and the most exasperating that we’ll ever have. It reaches out to his ineffable sadness, and almost gets there.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    The charm -- the midsummer enchantment -- never feels forced; it steals up and wins you. A true romance.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Anthony Lane
    For the most part, though, Love & Friendship is a frolic: crisp and closeted rather than expansive, with curt exchanges in drawing rooms, carriages, and gardens.

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