For 1,752 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 48% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

A.O. Scott's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 The Lobster
Lowest review score: 0 Blended
Score distribution:
1752 movie reviews
    • 56 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Funny and brisk, with enough good lines to make the comedy more satisfying than the somewhat routine but still unsettling jolts to the spine.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    The film is a compulsively detailed swirl of moods and impressions, intent on capturing the contradictions of the man and his times. Observations of Saint Laurent at work and in love give way to panoramic, intricate surveys of the world of commerce and culture in which he suffered and flourished.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Elegant and exquisitely tailored.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Sexy, sweet and laced with a sadness at once specific to its place and time and accessible to anyone with a breakable heart, Chico & Rita is an animated valentine to Cuba and its music.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Director Sandi Simcha DuBowski latches on to a provocative subject and invests it with a compelling tenderness.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Colossal has such an easygoing, offhand vibe, and takes such pleasure in its characters’ foibles, that it camouflages its deep subject, which is rage.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    By turns touching, amusing and genuinely disturbing, it defies expectations and easy categorization, forgoing obvious laughs and cheap emotional payoffs in favor of something much odder and more interesting.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Has an offbeat, absurdist charm that turns a potentially creepy conceit into an odd, touching adventure.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    In the best B-movie tradition, the filmmakers embed their ideas in an ingenious, propulsive and suspenseful genre entertainment, one that respects your intelligence even as it makes your eyes pop (and, once in a while, your stomach turn).
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Though Mr. Favreau probably had to co-star in Made to make his exposé of the loser's mushy pink underbelly of "Swingers" register, he might have come up with a better picture if he had stayed behind the camera. But he's willing to take chances, and he'll learn from this movie.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The most obvious thing to say about Far From the Madding Crowd is also the most bizarre, given the source material. It’s buoyant, pleasant and easygoing. That’s a recommendation of sorts, and also an expression of disappointment.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    There are no big surprises, but the jumps and jolts are well timed and the overall mood is at once grisly and good-natured -- more diverting than disturbing.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Gout combines a slick, kinetic style with a somber ethical sense. His movie is flashy and entertaining, but also earnestly concerned with the collapse of trust and integrity at every level of society.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The cumulative effect is exhilarating and also a bit frustrating, since so many dances are included and woven together the audience does not have the chance to experience any single work in its entirety. But the power and intelligence of Bausch's approach, which at times seems more cerebral than sensual, is communicated.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    If it tells, in Mr. Ludin’s words, "a typical German story," the movie also offers an unusually matter-of-fact picture of the private and public effects of ordinary evil.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    There is also much in The Art of Getting By that is worth praising, and if you can grade on a curve - setting the standard at "The Wackness" rather than "The Squid and the Whale" - you may find yourself touched, tickled and occasionally surprised.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Intent on showing that Arbor and Swifty live in a world of radically limited possibilities, barely sustained by their families and failed by the state, Ms. Barnard locks them into a narrative prison. Their fates seem predetermined less by their circumstances than by the iron will and limited imagination of their creator.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Often very smart about being silly.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Mostly it's exhilarating.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Stranger by the Lake is seductive and fascinating, but it is also a bit trapped in its own conceit, and in its carefully maintained emotional detachment.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    This film, commissioned by Mr. Russell and directed by Les Blank, is among other things a strange and gorgeous artifact of its moment. Happily indifferent to the conventions of its genre, it’s neither the record of a concert nor a talking-head-driven biography.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Certainly touching, even heart-rending at times, and it mostly steers clear of the didacticism and sentimentality its subject matter often invites. But it never takes the full measure of its modest heroine, and makes her world a bit too small.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    It’s a work of art that troubles the conscience, in part because it suggests, both by default and by design, that no art is innocent, and that its preservation, like its destruction, depends on the operation of power.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    World War Z often feels smaller and quieter than it is, because your attention is drawn to details and moments rather than to showstopping spectacles or self-important themes.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Has a lovely, unadorned, though distended sentimentality.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    To accuse it of being manipulative is like accusing it of being in color. The genre is melodrama. The assault on the tear ducts and heartstrings is part of the contract, and the movie more than holds up its end of the bargain.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Greene’s impressionistic style and rough, off-center compositions create an atmosphere of intimacy, as if the viewer were being invited to read Ms. Burre’s diary or her mind.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    As the latest tribute -- Jim Brown’s loving documentary, Pete Seeger: The Power of Song -- makes clear, he’s still busy, still angry, still hopeful, still singing.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Hilali and Benghabrit were real people. Mr. Ferroukhi, who wrote the script with Alain-Michel Blanc, deftly interweaves their stories with the adventures of the fictional Younes, and so contributes a worthy and interesting chapter to the tradition of World War II dramas of conscience.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Brugger's portrait of shameless, routine collusion between exploitative foreigners and dysfunctional dictatorships is depressing and undeniable. Unless, that is, The Ambassador is even more of a hoax than it seems to be. This strikes me as plausible, since somebody having this much fun in such proximity to horror may not be completely trustworthy.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    It is worth sticking with it until the end, since the third part is the most powerful.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The two lead performances — Lika Babluani as Eka and Mariam Bokeria as Natia — are direct and unaffected, but also enigmatic in the way that nonprofessional screen acting can be in the hands of a sensitive director.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The movie may be a little too tame in the end, but at its best it is just wild enough.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The fact that the speakers' faces are never seen produces a feeling of estrangement that is crucial to the film's effectiveness. You become acutely aware of gaps and discontinuities: between slogans and realities, between political ideals and stubborn social problems, between then and now.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    But true to its title, The Hangover goes down smoothly enough and then kicks you in the head later on, when you start to examine the sources of your laughter.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Perhaps it's the difference in culture, but the thoughtfulness in Smell of Camphor, Fragrance of Jasmine shows that its creator isn't letting himself or his audience off the hook.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    While Stranger Than Fiction traffics in a bit of darkly funny existential anxiety, it also finds room for romantic fantasy and sentimental uplift.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    No one in Jerichow is entirely deserving of sympathy, which gives the film a detached, clinical feeling underlined by the director’s habit of observing emotions rather than evoking them.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Oliveira relishes the formality of conversation, and there is great pleasure to be found in listening to the actors and watching the small adjustments of posture and gesture that accompany their words.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The brutality in the film is pervasive and often stomach turningly graphic, but what is perhaps most unnerving is the tact, patience and care with which Mr. McQueen depicts its causes and effects.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    However frustrated they may be by political paralysis, corporate trickery or plain human stupidity, none of them seem inclined to give up. When they do, we really will be screwed, and we won't have or need movies like this to tell us so.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The internet is an elusive quarry. It’s a marvel and a menace, a banal fact of life and a force for incalculable change. But it’s also less the subject of this captivating, uneven film than an excuse for its director to add to his collection of memorable faces and voices.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The movie itself is an effective nightmare, and a solid piece of filmmaking, strong enough to make you wish that it could have borne the full weight of the tragedy it set out to depict.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Dear John carefully distills selected elements of human experience and reduces them to a sweet and digestible syrup. It may not be strong medicine, but it delivers an effective, pleasing dose of pure sentiment and vicarious heartache.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The film offers an easygoing and generous blend of wish fulfillment, vicarious luxury, wry humor and spiritual uplift, with a star, Julia Roberts, who elicits both envy and empathy.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Though it lacks the artful, headlong immediacy of "The Circle" and "Offside," Jafar Panahi's films about women in Tehran - and the breakneck exuberance of Bahman Ghobadi's "No One Knows About Persian Cats," about Tehran's underground music scene - Circumstance ripples with the indignant energy of youthful rebellion.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Garrel is always worth attending to when he takes up the rhythms and paradoxes of love, and even though this is a minor entry in his canon of melancholy romances, it is brief, brisk and intermittently affecting.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    In spite of Mr. Giamatti's ferociously energetic performance Barney's Version never figures out just who Barney is.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The power of Ratcatcher comes from its hushed lyricism and Ms. Ramsay's talent for conveying emotional complexity.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Rock has not only done his best work as a director and screenwriter but has also made an unusually insightful and funny mainstream American movie about the predicaments of modern marriage.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    A sleek, swift and exciting adaptation of J. K. Rowling’s longest novel to date.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Unlike its beer-soaked protagonist, Everything Must Go remains dry, serving up its catharsis in wry, moderate doses and making the most of its modest, careful virtues. It is a sober movie, but also sad and satisfying.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Ms. Rapace, tiny and agile, her steely rage showing now and then the tiniest crack of vulnerability, belongs to another dimension altogether. She makes this movie good enough, but also makes you wish it were much better.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The film dwells on the logistical and bureaucratic details of the process, and if it does not exactly write a fresh chapter in the history of art, it stands as an exemplary study in the sociology of art administration.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    If there is a bit more humor on display here -- some of it evidence that an element of self-conscious self-mockery is sneaking into the franchise -- there is also more violence, and, true to the film’s title, a deeper intimation of darkness. What there isn’t, as usual, is much in the way of good acting, with the decisive and impressive exception of Ms. Stewart, who can carry a close-up about as well as anyone in movies today.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Desmond Doss was calm, humble and courageous, qualities Mr. Gibson honors but does not share. It is possible to be moved and inspired by Desmond’s exploits while still feeling that his convictions have been exploited, perhaps even betrayed.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The sweetness at the core of the raggedy low-budget romantic comedy Jump Tomorrow is hard to resist.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Engrossing and at times impressive, a pretty good movie that is disappointing to the extent that it could have been great. Is this the way the world ends? With polite applause?
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    It may be asking too much of The East — which is, after all, a twisty, breathless genre film — to wish that it would frame the contradictions of contemporary capitalism more rigorously. The movie is aware that they exist, and wishes that they could be resolved more or less happily, which is hard to argue with, though also hard to believe.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    A modest superhero picture may sound like a contradiction in terms, but really it is a welcome respite.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    This film is a document of hope, progress and idealism but also a reminder that the deep springs of bigotry and violence that fed a long, vicious campaign of domestic terrorism have not dried up.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    It is frequently gripping and sincere in its intentions, but never quite as revelatory, or as devastating, as it should be.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Zandvliet is less interested in the stark battle between good and evil than in the shifting ground of power and responsibility, and the way that every person carries the potential for decency and depravity.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    There must be a name for a picture so inconsequential, in which the music provides so much of the chemistry that you get the feeling Bossa Nova would be funereal without it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    You suspect, before long, that there is no strong reason for this production to exist, but it is reasonably good fun all the same.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    When Animals Dream is a beguiling parable of cruelty and the resistance to it. Its special effects are pretty minimal, its scope is modest, and it is, in the end, more touching than terrifying, intent on jolting its audience not with dread but with compassion.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    A charming, earnest, sometimes ungainly mixture of history, criticism and high-minded gossip, Notfilm testifies to an almost inexhaustible fascination with the pleasures and paradoxes of cinema.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The film’s struggle against simplification — against the sentimentality, wishful thinking and outright denial that defines most Hollywood considerations of America’s racial past — is palpable, almost heroic, even if it is not always successful.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    One of Mr. Brisseau's subjects is the volatility of desire, the way the path of erotic curiosity can swerve from satisfaction into recrimination and confusion. A porno-philosopher in the venerable French tradition, he blends a frank appeal to the audience's nether regions with some teasing attention to its mind.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    And yet something vital here works. There are, come to think of it, a lot of little things.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    To take Mommy as an undisciplined outpouring of aggression and angst is to underestimate its artistry. [Mr. Dolan] has both advanced beyond the romanticism of “Heartbeats” and “Laurence Anyways” and regressed toward a more primal and confrontational mode of storytelling. Mommy may seem out of control, but it knows exactly what it’s doing.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Money Monster begins with a jolt of satire, proceeds through a maze of beat-the-clock exposition and lands on a surprisingly gentle, sentimental note.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The movie, uneven as it is, has terrific momentum and passages of concentrated visual beauty. The acting is strong even when the script wanders into thickets of rhetoric and mystification. And despite its efforts to simplify and italicize the story, it’s admirably difficult, raising thorny questions about ends and means, justice and mercy, and the legacy of racism that lies at the root of our national identity.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The Notebook is a skillfully made movie, with sequences that may haunt you after you leave the theater. But it lacks the power to turn its virtuosity, or the emotional discipline of its remarkable young leads, into a source of insight.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Reiner and Mr. Kudlow may not quite merit full-metal glory, but they don't deserve oblivion either, and Anvil! The Story of Anvil makes both a case and a place for their band.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Though it is an ambitious - at times mesmerizing - application of the latest cinematic technology, the movie tries to recapture some of the menace of the stories that used to be told to scare children rather than console them.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The Orphanage, a diverting, overwrought ghost story from Spain, relies on basic and durable horror movie techniques.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    There are worse things than loutish, laddish cool, and as a series of poses and stunts, Sherlock Holmes is intermittently diverting.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The obsessive crosshatching of allusion, spoof and homage that gives Grindhouse its texture is the product of a highly refined generational sensibility.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    In the House weaves a pleasant and clever spell, manipulating the viewer much in the way that Claude plays with Germain.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Within this gore-spattered, superficially nihilistic carapace is an old-fashioned platoon picture, a sensitive and superbly acted tale of male bonding under duress.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    A thin, unconvincing movie made likable by the charm and skill of its cast and by a script peppered with wit and insight.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Abu-Assad shows a world from which all trust has vanished, where every relationship carries the possibility — perhaps the inevitability — of betrayal and where every form of honor is corroded by lies.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    A Christmas Carol -- I mean the source material, without a corporate possessive attached to it -- remains among the most moving works of holiday literature, and Mr. Zemeckis has remained true to its finest sentiments. He is an innovator, but his traditionalism is what makes this movie work.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    A bit of a puzzle. This is a good thing, since most movies plop down in easily recognizable categories and stay there, troubling neither their own intellectual inertia nor that of the audience.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The real flaw is that the movie's best features -- the aching clarity of its central performances -- threaten to be lost in a wilderness of metaphor and mystification.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The film, beautifully shot and cleanly edited, has the economy of a short story, unfolding in a mood of slightly sentimental masculine stoicism.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The laughter is mean but also oddly pure: it expels shame and leaves you feeling dizzy, a little embarrassed and also exhilarated, kind of like the cocaine that two of the main characters consume by accident.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The charm of Radio Unnameable is, finally, elegiac. It can make you wish - or, if you're lucky, remember - that you were a sleepless New Yorker in 1967, kept from loneliness by a gentle, soulful voice on the radio.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Once you have seen a sheep munching on a bloody human leg, you may think twice about your next leg of lamb. On the other hand maybe you'll be inspired to seek vengeance. To provoke one of these responses -- vegetarianism or a defiant meat eating -- may be the point of this odd, amusing film.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Its intentions are, to some degree, corrective: It mocks some of the popular corruptions of faith so as to invite the audience to reflect upon what real faith might be.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Works so hard at celebrating wide eyes and naïve joy that it comes close to spoiling its own intermittent wonderfulness.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The movie, in other words, belongs solidly to Mr. Radcliffe, Mr. Grint and Ms. Watson, who have grown into nimble actors, capable of nuances of feeling that would do their elders proud.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Some of the underdog appeal is gone, but a victory lap can be its own kind of fun, and more is not necessarily something to complain about, especially when what there is more of is Fat Amy.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    It's in the small touches that this movie comes alive, and it's rare that directors can pull off this kind of thing.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Nemes orchestrates a tour de force of suspense, a swift symphony of collisions, coincidences and reversals that is almost unbearably exciting. His skill is undeniable, but also troubling. The movie offers less insight than sensation, an emotional experience that sits too comfortably within the norms of entertainment. This is not entirely the director’s fault. The Holocaust, once forbidden territory, is now safe and familiar ground.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Does a thoughtful job of streamlining the bloody realities -- both literal and psychological -- of China's Cultural Revolution into roughly two hours of film.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Schiffli shoots in a fluid style, tweaking colors and focus to register changes in perception and feeling. Anxiety dissolves in sunshine and dreamy music, gathers up again in darker colors and more dissonant sounds and then winds up to a pitch of panic.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Regrettably, it is not a home run or a perfect game, but it isn't a wild throw, an errant bunt or a dropped fly ball either. Trouble With the Curve is either an off-speed pitch that just catches the edge of the strike zone or a bloop single lofted into right field. The runner is safe. The movie is too.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The film’s plots are soft and flimsy, and they don’t mesh as gracefully as they might, but they do serve as an adequate trellis for Mr. McKellen’s performance, which is gratifyingly but unsurprisingly wonderful.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The Purge: Election Year takes itself just seriously enough to provide the expected measure of fun — a blend of aggression, release and relief. A lot of people die, but no one really gets hurt.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Brazenly self-confident in its refusal to pander to the imagined sensitivity of its audience. In this it differs notably from Albert Brooks's "Looking for Comedy in the Muslim World," which approached some of the same topics with misplaced thoughtfulness and tact.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    This film, Mr. Caetano's feature-length directorial debut, has an emotional integrity that's concise and direct.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    A sometimes intoxicating, sometimes headache-inducing cocktail: a sweet, libidinous love story; a candid comedy of bedroom and workplace manners; and, most bravely, if also most jarringly, a medical melodrama involving a chronic and very serious disease.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The blossoming of her ambition, as much as her love life, drives the story forward, and turns Coco Before Chanel into a costume drama worthy of the name.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Ms. Johnson and the screenwriter, Mark Jude Poirier, have transformed a taciturn masterpiece into an absorbing, messy, modest story of damaged relationships.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Tangled is the 50th animated feature from Disney, and its look and spirit convey a modified, updated but nonetheless sincere and unmistakable quality of old-fashioned Disneyness.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    October Country feels at once personal and objective, a fascinating hybrid of two important tendencies in the modern documentary.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    It’s easy to root for Malcolm, to admire his pluck and share in his enthusiasm. It may be a little harder to buy what he and Dope are selling.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Relax, the staging of the action sequences is as viciously elegant as you've been primed to expect, though there is a dispiriting more-of-the-same aspect to the picture.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The satire may be a little too gentle, but there is something disarmingly tender about the way Mr. Lee dramatizes young Billy’s predicament. You may be surprised at how sweet this movie is and also, in retrospect, startled by how bleak its vision turns out to be.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The movie's advertising tagline ("Starsky & Hutch — they're the Man") needs to be amended. The film belongs, completely and utterly, to Snoop Dogg.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The characters and situations are interesting enough, and the filmmaking is sufficiently skilled to provide a measure of reasonably thoughtful entertainment.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    World on a Wire, while too slow and diffuse to count as a lost masterpiece, is valuable in expanding our sense of what Fassbinder could do and is also a source of much visual and intellectual pleasure in its own right.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Unlike his precursors Georges Franju and Luis Buñuel, who reveled in the shock of incongruity, Mr. Ruiz took it in stride. His gliding, floating camera could make wild impossibilities look utterly natural. And so it is in Night Across the Street, where the present commingles with the past, and seeming is another way of being.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Slight, charming and refreshingly candid little picture.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Beloved is at once whimsical and heartfelt, alive to the absurdity and perversity of amorous behavior and also to the gravity and intensity of human emotions.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    As The Debt grows more complex and suspenseful, it also becomes more literal, losing some of its dramatic intensity.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Joy
    The movie, in all its mess and glory, belongs almost entirely to Ms. Lawrence. She is the kind of movie star who turns everyone else into a character actor. This is not a complaint but an acknowledgment of both her charisma and her generosity.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Many of the funniest parts seem to arise spontaneously from Mr. Hart’s uncensored brain and fast-moving mouth. He can swerve from tears to mock outrage to anatomically detailed obscenities faster than just about any other comic performer working today, and in Ms. Hall he has found an excellent match.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    If Dormant Beauty does not rank among Mr. Bellocchio’s best movies, it nonetheless still occasionally shows him at his best. His eye for the latent beauty and evident absurdity of Italian life remains acute, as does his appreciation for vivid performance.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Not everything that happens in Fighting entirely makes sense -- it’s a fable, after all, and a fable doesn't necessarily have to -- but it breathes with a rough, exuberant realism that you rarely see in movies of its kind.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The comedy is more wry than uproarious, the melodrama gently poignant rather than operatic, and the sentimentality just sweet enough to be satisfying rather than bothersome.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Less a conventional movie adaptation than a splashy, trashy opera, a wayward, lavishly theatrical celebration of the emotional and material extravagance that Fitzgerald surveyed with fascinated ambivalence.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    An energetic, enjoyably preposterous compound - it's a paranoid thriller blended with pseudo-neuro-science fiction and catalyzed by a jolting dose of satire.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Dan in Real Life is neither wildly farcical nor mockingly cruel, but rather, for the most part, winningly gentle and observant.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The mood is not one of misery, but of quiet, weary endurance punctuated with moments of joy.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    In spite of its raw, explicit moments, the film is at heart a sturdy morality tale about innocence and corruption, wealth and want, sex and power.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The hope that infuses this movie makes it all the more upsetting to walk out of the theater and contemplate a looming disaster that the world's leaders seem unable to prevent.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Win Win goes a bit soft in places, protecting its characters from serious danger or tough moral reckoning. But the film's niceness is also central to its appeal, because nearly all of the characters are people you enjoy spending time with.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Bulger, a former boxer and model before he turned to journalism and then filmmaking, does not let "Behind the Music" sensationalism overwhelm the music itself, which is Mr. Baker's great passion and the only reason anyone should take an interest in him.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The sophistication of the stylized minimalism here in Infernal Affairs is dazzling.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The charm of The Strange Case of Angelica lies in the way it balances this mysticism with a thoroughly secular sense of the business of everyday life.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The virtuosity on display makes the weakness of the story all the more frustrating. I'll avoid spoilers here, but Prometheus kind of spoils itself with twists and reversals that pull the movie away from its lofty, mind-blowing potential.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Because of the movie's wonderful shamelessness, its mordantly funny chills and fights are huge turn-ons. A B picture in love with the zest of its comic-book origins, it embodies that medium's pulse-pounding spiritedness and silliness.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The movie, true to its own PG-13 rating, opts for mildness, modesty and chastened optimism. At the same time, though, it seems to know that a crueler, more cynical rendering of its story - a "Bitter, Hopeless, Love" - lurks between the lines.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Roskam’s direction is gratifyingly loose. He lets the story, which is really the least interesting part of the movie, more or less take care of itself, allowing us to savor pungent morsels of dialogue and bits of low-key actorly showboating.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Though it is modest, almost anecdotal, in scale, 12:08 East of Bucharest is also characterized by a precise and sneaky formal wit.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The plot of Alan Partridge (also known as “Alan Partridge: Alpha Papa”) is designed not for coherence but to maximize the chances for Mr. Coogan to riff in character and to bring his alter ego to the very edge of either improbable likability or utter awfulness.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The images in Endless Poetry are arresting and sometimes disturbing, but there is an earnest commitment to ecstasy and authenticity that renders moot any question of offensiveness or exploitation.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Neighbors is not a great film and does not really aspire to be. It is more a status report on mainstream American movie comedy, operating in a sweet spot between the friendly and the nasty, and not straining to be daring, obnoxious or even especially original. It knows how to have fun. How very grown-up.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The time does pass agreeably enough, and if Cairo Time does not amount to much, it does evoke a wistful state of feeling and a complicated city with enough skill and sensitivity that you wish it had dared more.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    In its sweet, lackadaisical way, Michel Gondry’s Be Kind Rewind illuminates the pleasures and paradoxes of movie love.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    If the extremity of Hallam's temperament tests the limits of our sympathy as well as our credulity, Mr. Bell's ability to seem by turns sweet and scary prevents us from losing interest entirely.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Good pulp depends, above all, on a ruthless sense of economy, and Three Monkeys is just a bit too profligate, too fancy, to be entirely convincing.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The movie is an unapologetically rarefied undertaking and at the same time a gracious and inviting film. And it embodies an elegant and melancholy paradox: What looks like tourism is really the pursuit of truth and beauty, and vice versa.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    A sad and spirited elegy for the Carnegie Hall Studios, which for more than a century provided working, living and teaching space for all kinds of artists on the floors above the famous concert hall.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Like its protagonist, sensitively and shrewdly played by Lakeith Stanfield, the film is soft-spoken and thoughtful, with sweet, lyrical touches that alleviate some of the grimness without blunting the cruelty and injustice of what happened.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Unabashedly polemical and rigorously pessimistic, a sustained Marxian indictment of 21st-century capital. The narration, by Mr. Sekula, is at times lyrical and rarely subtle, but the film is most graceful and moving when its argument slows down or wanders into an interesting tangent.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    While Frankenweenie is fun, it is not nearly strange or original enough to join the undead, monstrous ranks of the classics it adores.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Originally intended as a cable television series, Middle Men bears some telltale scars of hasty, clumsy truncation. Still, there is a raffish vigor that makes the movie watchable despite all-over-the-map storytelling and a fuzzy, superficial grasp of the salient themes.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    9
    Every effort to expand the range of feature-length animation beyond the confines of cautious family fare is to be welcomed, and budding techno and fantasy geeks are likely to be intrigued and enthralled.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    A valuable and intelligent introduction and tribute to their anarchic, uncompromising and absolutely peculiar genius.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    With its pointed narrative, the film makes its case with a minimum of pushiness and a subtle nod to its crowd.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    I suspect that he would have approved of Mr. Lee's film, and not only because it approves so unreservedly of him. Paul Goodman Changed My Life may not have that effect on every viewer, but it has a passionate, almost prophetic sense of the impact that a writer and thinker can have on his times and the future.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The dazzling, high-flying silliness is quite an achievement. The movie is better than it deserves to be, given its origins: a ride at Disneyland and Disney World.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    There are many lovely and memorable moments in this film, which is in every way the opposite of a vanity project. If anything, Ms. Portman seems constrained by her own modesty, by a justified but nonetheless limiting reverence for her source material.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The directors Andrew Rossi and Kate Novack may not be great filmmakers -- it's hard to tell, based on this bare-bones picture -- but they know a great story, and more important, how to tell it.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Can't redeem the moves toward its predictable happy ending. But the movie has a protagonist who has a great time getting there.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The Portuguese Nun has wit and feeling, though the wit is at times almost imperceptibly subtle and the feeling somewhat stylized.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    [The film] is not perfect, but it is fast-moving, intermittently witty and pretty good fun.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The film is touching and small, but also thoughtful and assured in a way that lingers after the inevitable tears have been shed and the obvious lessons learned.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Simon Brook used five hidden cameras, and the audience has a sense of witnessing intimate moments rather than watching a performance.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    A somber, absorbing and only moderately preposterous new thriller.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    A comforting, sentimental tale of a kind that would be insufferably maudlin if made in Hollywood and unbearably affectless if it showed up at Sundance. Somehow it’s easier to take in French.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    This is a calm film about strong emotions, but it does find a reservoir of intensity in the two central performances, in particular Mr. Del Toro’s.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    You might feel like you’re in the company of a manic cinephile friend breathlessly recounting his favorite movie scenes in no particular order. You admire his devotion, his taste and his scholarship, but in the end the experience is probably more satisfying for him than it is for you. Still, the company isn’t bad.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Like birding itself, The Big Year rewards patience. It respects both the integrity and the eccentricity of the avian obsession, and it communicates something of the fascinating abundance and weirdness of the animals themselves.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    A lively minor addendum to the grand tradition of Italian fraternal cinema.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The director, Mark Waters, working with a smart casting team, has assembled a superb group of players. Scene by scene you can't help being impressed by Mean Girls; it's like a group of sketches linked by a theme, with some playing much better than others.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    A playful parlor trick, a departure from the performance-art films that have made this director's reputation. In keeping with his lighter side, *Corpus is also fun; imagine a Looney Tunes segment or an episode of Nickelodeon's "Kablam!" directed by Red Grooms.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Accomplishes the depressingly familiar mathematical trick of being both more and less than its predecessor.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    It's more of a mash note than a formal documentary, and there's nothing wrong with that.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    What gives the movie its power is that even the most innocuous scenes in the boys' lives are shadowed by dread.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Pootie Tang may be raw and slovenly -- hey, it often is raw and slovenly -- but it succeeds as a laugh getter because of the spot-on satirical notes. You might say that the movie walks it like it talks it; I'm not sure what Pootie would say.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The reckoning with the past, which has occupied West German society since the 1960s, has been painful and divisive, which makes the calm, empirical spirit of this film all the more impressive.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    If a movie of this kind didn't traffic in overstatement, it wouldn't be doing its job, which is to provide a strong dose of simple, rousing emotion.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Much of the fun in Enemy, which is tightly constructed and expertly shot, lies in Mr. Gyllenhaal’s playful and subtle performances.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The Counterfeiters is a swift and suspenseful thriller, and perhaps a little too entertaining for its own good.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    This is neither a simple satire of privilege nor a mock-provocative comedy of diversity and its discontents. It’s about a clash of values, about unresolvable contradictions. Or to put it another way, about good and evil.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Che
    Mr. Soderbergh once again offers a master class in filmmaking. As history, though, Che is finally not epic but romance. It takes great care to be true to the factual record, but it is, nonetheless, a fairy tale.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Parker...is not a great movie....But Parker is nonetheless great fun. It is part of a welcome trend, or counter-trend, in action filmmaking, an effort to strip away the apocalyptic bloat and digital fakery that have overtaken the genre and return to its pulpy, nasty, mechanical roots.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The blithe cruelties of outdoor living mount up, but the filmmakers refuse to exaggerate or sensationalize their material.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    As usual, the characters — and the performers playing them — step unto the breach to provide just enough wit and feeling to make Days of Future Past something other than a waste of a reasonable person’s time.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Shot in rich, wide-screen color, with minimal camera movements (except when a small camera is attached to a falcon’s restless head) and almost no dialogue, it is detached almost to the point of abstraction.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Though he can still deliver an amazing scare, Mr. Spielberg's interest now leans more toward exposition rather than the anticipatory. He is explaining the fun away.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The result is imperfect, but its roughness is entirely consistent with the way the filmmakers understand the traumatic experiences of displacement, loss and deprivation.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The Five-Year Engagement dutifully hits the marks of its genre, but it is also about the unpredictability of life and the everyday challenges of love. The sensitivity and honesty with which it addresses those matters is a pleasant surprise.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Syndromes and a Century, like its curious title, has the logic of a dream, a piece of music or perhaps a John Ashbery poem. Its coherence is evident; it is too lovely and lucid to be frustrating or dull. But it takes place just on the other side of conscious apprehension.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Kitano directed, edited and wrote Brother -- and his style of close-to-the-vest brutality travels extremely well.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Mister Lonely, self-enclosed though it may be, nonetheless demonstrates that Mr. Korine, who showed his ability to shock and repel in earlier films, also has the power to touch, to unsettle and to charm. This is undoubtedly a small movie, but it's also more than that: it's a small, imperfect world.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The Red Turtle practices a minor, gentle magic. It wants you to smile and say, “Ahh,” rather than gasp and say, “Wow.” But somehow the understatement can feel a bit overdone, as if the film were hovering over you, awaiting an expression of admiration.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Ms. McTeer's sly, exuberant performance is a pure delight, and the counterpoint between her physical expressiveness and Ms. Close's tightly coiled reserve is a marvel to behold. The rest of the film is a bit too decorous and tidy to count as a major revelation, but it dispenses satisfying doses of humor, pathos and surprise.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Is this chronicle of their combat an occasion for nostalgia or a cautionary tale? The film’s perfectly sensible, not entirely satisfying answer is “both.”
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Something about the strangeness of the people and the harsh indifference of the nature that surrounds them feels real, even if realism in the conventional sense may be the last thing on the filmmaker’s mind.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    There is something apocalyptically awful about Onkalo, to be sure, but the impulse behind it is noble, and the installation itself has an undeniable grandeur.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    It is gripping and haunting, but also coy and elusive.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    There is no denying the film’s uncanny power or its visual discipline. It’s a luminous puzzle with a few pieces missing.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Its powerful narratives leaves you with the strong suspicion that the whole story has not yet been told.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The grunts and howls seem every bit as mannered as the florid diction of Olivier and Oberon, perhaps even more so. Their artifice, like Brontë's own, was overt, whereas Ms. Arnold strives to disguise hers in the trappings of authenticity. And as a result, the impact - the grandeur, the art - of Wuthering Heights is diminished.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The most startling aspect of Robot Stories is not the mix that the director built from spare parts left on the curb but the evolving dramatic acumen of its maker; he's a talent with a future.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    It takes a perverse effort of will to love “Maps to the Stars.” It’s a little too chilly, and in some places too easy. But you may find yourself drawn back to it, and retracing its route from the familiar to the uncanny, from entertainment to revulsion, from dream to nightmare.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    John Cusack gives one of his wiliest performances in some time, and one of his most mature, as Nick Easter, an aging slacker drafted into jury duty. He subverts his protracted-adolescent cheekiness and pours the melted charm into something far bleaker.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    It communicates the delights of pastiche rather than the thrill of original creation, a secondhand movie love that is seductive but not entirely satisfying.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    There are a lot of loose ends and a few forced conclusions. But, then again, the acceptance of imperfection is Mr. Apatow's theme, so a degree of sloppiness is to be expected. That's life.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    A faithful and disarmingly earnest attempt to honor some venerable and popular Chinese cinematic traditions.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The three-part story, spread over nearly two and a half hours, represents a triumph of sympathetic imagination and a failure of narrative economy. But if, in the end, the film can’t quite sustain its epic vision, it does, along the way, achieve the density and momentum of a good novel.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Pacific Rim, with its carefree blend of silliness and solemnity, is clearly the product of an ingenious and playful pop sensibility.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Southern Comfort sent shock waves through this year's Sundance Film Festival, even though it is as much about generosity and courage and tolerance as it is about a potentially discomforting subject.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    A tour de force of meticulous cruelty, a comic melodrama that elicits laughter and empathy and then replaces those responses with squirming discomfort.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Its clever final plot twist adds a gratifying jolt of the uncanny to what is otherwise a charming, bittersweet meditation on the passage of time and the equivocal power of images to capture an older world at the moment of its disappearance.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    In the arresting Red Road, the dire Orwellian warning that Big Brother is watching has evolved from a grim fantasy of totalitarianism into a banal fact of life.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Unfortunately One Hour Photo turns everyone but the central character into a cutout.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The whole affair is pulpy, jokey, sometimes touching and frequently nonsensical: a big mess and, mostly, a lot of fun.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Primarily a riveting genre film that neatly exhibits the director's growing assurance -- Donald Goines would be proud.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Given that Untold Scandal is, like its predecessor, an epic story of spreading displeasure, the director's ability to keep it from feeling petty is a major feat.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Li will come out of Kiss of the Dragon smelling like a rose; the combat couldn't be better. But next time around, he should leave the script to more capable hands.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Gorgeously shot, moving through the decades in a gentle adagio, it is less a chronicle than a tribute -- and also, to non-initiates in the game of go, a bit of a puzzle.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The film's ideas are interesting, but don't feel entirely worked out, and Mr. Rockwell's intriguingly strange performance (or performances) is left suspended, without the context that would give Sam's plight its full emotional and philosophical impact. The smallness of this movie is decidedly a virtue, but also, in the end, something of a limitation.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Refreshingly tart and lean, forgoing the usual schmaltz and syrup.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Sicko is the least controversial and most broadly appealing of Mr. Moore’s movies. (It is also, perhaps improbably, the funniest and the most tightly edited.) The argument it inspires will mainly be about the nature of the cure, and it is here that Mr. Moore’s contribution will be most provocative and also, therefore, most useful.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    As it develops, Dare lays out some interesting psychological puzzles, though the filmmakers lack the technique to explore them as thoroughly as you might wish.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The intoxicating madness of Tears of the Black Tiger is in the end too willed, too deliberate, to be entirely divine.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    As ever, Mr. Chabrol’s style is delicate and precise. Comedy of Power is not his deepest or most ambitious film, and its stance of knowing resignation in the face of corruption can feel a little glib. But Ms. Huppert's ferocity compensates for the director's detachment; no French actress is as riveting to watch once the gloves come off.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    If Intimacy does anything well, it portrays desperation, in many different forms.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    What Mr. Hanson has done with 8 Mile is make a pop movie instead of a movie about pop. There's nothing disreputable about this.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Precisely because their attitudes are so bluntly hedonistic and apolitical, Harold and Kumar manage to be fairly persuasive when they get around to criticizing the status quo, which the movie has the wit to acknowledge itself as part of.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Loads of fun. It has a jamming B-picture buzz -- the kind of swift filmmaking and high spirits that have been missing from movies for a while.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    When the turmoil of the last 12 months has receded and the 10th-anniversary deluxe collectors edition comes around, this strange, numb cinematic experience may seem fresh, shocking and poignant rather than merely and depressingly true.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Escalante is an exceptionally deft and subtle realist, and you sometimes feel, in “Heli” and even more so in The Untamed that he is drawn to extremity partly out of boredom with his own skill.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    There is something graceful and effortless about this performance (Mr. Smith's), which not only shows what it might feel like to be the last man on earth, but also demonstrates what it is to be a movie star.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Regards its characters with affectionate detachment, and assures its audience that no great calamities or revelations are in store. Instead, there are a series of small crises and tiny epiphanies, all adding up to a story that courts triviality in its pursuit of charm.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Such an accurate depiction of cramped spirits, small-mindedness and men unable to make changes in their lives takes its toll. Distant feels as if it's going nowhere in no particular hurry, and finally leaves us distant from its characters.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    An enjoyable and charming if overactive fantasy.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The opening shots, of Farmer on horseback in his space suit, hint at a strangeness that the rest of the movie never quite lives up to, but it does have a visual freshness that makes the bromides and clichés palatable.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    At times The TV Set seems to unfold almost entirely without exaggeration.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    This is a high-concept comedy, and none of the jokes are forced, which makes Meet the Parents a singular achievement.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    [Mr. Odar] allows the story to unfold at a deliberate pace, emphasizing the psychological nuances of the mystery rather than its procedural details, and using graceful wide-screen compositions and haunting sound design to create a compelling mood of menace, anxiety and sorrow.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    An admiring, clever remake of Kim Ki-young's legendary film of the same title from 1960, this version, directed by Im Sang-soo, is at once more explicit than the original and less kinky.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    It is interesting and ingenious, even if some of the kinky, queasy fascination that had been so intoxicating in the earlier scenes ebbs away.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Although it is composed mainly of archival footage and touches on a great many actual events, Double Take, as you may already have gathered, is not quite a documentary. It is, instead, a meditation on a series of loosely related themes drawn together, somewhat tenuously, by the familiar yet elusive sensibility that Hitchcock brought to Hollywood and then to American television.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Has a winningly pulpy, jaunty, earnest spirit.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The subtlety of the film is both an accomplishment and a limitation. It’s hard not to want more for these women, and to wish you could see more of them.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The film's seductive lack of pretension will make a fan of you.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    It is a modest, competent, effective movie, concerned above all with doing the job of explaining how the job was done.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The charm and audacity of this film lie in the way it blends the commonplace and the bizarre.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Part courtroom drama, part rumination on what separates human beings from other animals, the film is above all a sympathetic portrait of an advocate.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The extravagance of the sets and costumes increases the theatricality; Chunhyang is an almost childlike delight for the eyes.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The charms of Sing Street should not be underestimated. Partly because its manner is unassuming and its story none too original...it’s easy to overlook Mr. Carney’s ingenuity and sensitivity.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    [Ms. Tsangari's] inquiry stops short of the hearts of these men, and she seems content to dramatize some of the sad, ridiculous and tender ways that boys will be boys.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    With the help of some solid performances and James Horner’s heart-squeezing, throat-constricting score (one of the last he composed before his death in June), The 33 holds your attention and pushes the required buttons.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The real fun is the insect shtick.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The Imitation Game is a highly conventional movie about a profoundly unusual man. This is not entirely a bad thing.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    To some degree in spite of Ms. Poitras’s journalistic intentions — though very much as a consequence of her rigorous honesty — the picture that emerges is complicated, unsettling and intriguingly ambivalent.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The Bling Ring occupies a vertiginous middle ground between banality and transcendence, and its refusal to commit to one or the other is both a mark of integrity and a source of frustration.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    It is suspenseful, horrifying and at times intensely moving. But the ease with which it elicits these responses from the audience feels more opportunistic than insightful.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Wants to blend thrills and pathos, getting at the many sides of what is, as Mr. Blaustein describes it, a carny act.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Its tone is quietly comical, with each chapter treated as an extended joke, or as an R-rated O. Henry story angling toward a neat concluding twist.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    You are likely to remember this charming film, directed by Nadine Labaki, less for its gently comic, mildly melodramatic plot than for its friendly and inviting atmosphere.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The old "Fright Night" was both self-aware and effectively scary, and if this one seems to prefer gruesome digital effects to old-fashioned bump-in-the-night spookiness, it still succeeds in keeping the audience both tickled and anxious.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    At its best, The Nativity Story shares with "Hail Mary" an interest in finding a kernel of realism in the old story of a pregnant teenager in hard times. Buried in the pageantry, in other words, is an interesting movie.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    More likely to be recalled as a moderately satisfying entertainment than remembered as a classic.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The most gratifying thing about "Eames" is that it shows, in marvelous detail, how their work was an extension of themselves and how their distinct personalities melded into a unique and protean force.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Unfortunately, it is also less than the sum of its parts -- overly long, lacking in narrative momentum and too often choosing sensation over coherence.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The emotions are quiet, and the connections among the characters feel tentative and fragile. Though it makes no reference to the current economic and political crisis in Greece, Attenberg is suffused with a sense of malaise - of stasis, if you prefer a Greek word - that way well reflect the contemporary national mood.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    A thriller, a murder mystery and a somewhat self-conscious literary puzzle. All of that is entertaining enough, if a bit preposterous and overdone, but the twists and convolutions of the film’s beginning and end enable a middle that is dizzying domestic comedy.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Ms. Bening's precise, pitiless tracing of her character's decline from feisty defiance to pathetic, overmedicated self-delusion gives the film an emotional weight it might not otherwise have.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Is this evidence of cultural decline? It's hard to think of a short answer that wouldn't be made more vivid by the insertion of the forbidden word. So skip it. No, not the movie. What, are you kidding me? No way. Go. Help yourself.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The girl-boy-girl threesome, which turns out to be short-lived, is perhaps the most straightforward emotional configuration in this odd, witty, touching film.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Much of All About Lily Chou-Chou is mesmerizing: some of its plaintiveness could make you weep. If only Mr. Iwai trusted the material enough.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    One of the most delightful things about To Rome With Love is how casually it blends the plausible and the surreal, and how unabashedly it revels in pure silliness.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Quite a bit darker than "The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe," both in look and in mood. It is also in some ways more satisfying.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The fact that you know more or less exactly what’s coming doesn’t diminish the creepiness, or lessen the jolt when the thing you’re dreading arrives.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Ms. Macdonald is quite simply a revelation, capturing the reflexive self-confidence and defensive diffidence of the millennial generation with sneaky sincerity and offhand wit.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Brad’s Status at its best is genuinely thought-provoking.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The psychological underpinnings give this picture a charged emotional atmosphere. The dizzying unspoken feelings between the two men mesh so well that the movie seems to have been worked out like a perverse drawing-room comedy.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Fortunately, Mr. Kumai, who himself has shown no aversion to baroque melodrama, leans here toward a plain and direct style that is tasteful and intelligent, a boon, given the predictability of the story. He understands the difference between pitiable and pitiful.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Willem Dafoe steals the picture with his comic timing.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    It
    The filmmakers honor both the pastoral and the infernal dimensions of Mr. King’s distinctive literary vision.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    There is warmth and intelligence here, and undeniable sincerity, but also a determination, in the face of much painful and fascinating history, to play it safe.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Often unspeakably funny.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    A smart, well-meaning project -- never quite pulls itself together. It has a vague, half-finished feeling, as if it had not figured out what it was trying to do. Which may amount to a kind of realism -- an accurate reflection of where we are in Afghanistan.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    This very crowded, reasonably enjoyable installment in the Avengers cycle...reveals, even more than its predecessors, an essential truth about the Marvel Cinematic Universe. It’s not so much a grand science-fiction saga, or even a series of action-adventure movies, as a very expensive, perpetually renewed workplace sitcom.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Passion is often sleek and enjoyable, dispensing titillation, suspense and a few laughs without taking itself too seriously.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The movie, by virtue of its self-conscious parody of the kind of movie it is, turns out to be an unusually smart and sensitive example of the genre.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Trier and Mr. Lie - a quiet, recessive but nonetheless magnetically self-assured screen presence - emphasize Anders's individuality above all. Oslo, August 31st has the satisfying gravity of specific experience, and also, true to its title, a prickly sense of place.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Diverting, hectic entertainment, which refuses to take anything too seriously, staking out a middle ground between melodrama and farce.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Some of the climactic turns seem to follow the kind of narrative rules that this film, and this filmmaker, have otherwise defied.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    A nimble and winning little romance
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    But Babies just might restore your faith in our perplexing, peculiar and stubbornly lovable species.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Get Him to the Greek displays the bawdy-sweet mixture that is the signature of the Judd Apatow school of screen comedy.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Aronofsky is a virtuoso of mood and timing, a devoted student of form and technique straining to be a credible visionary. But as wild and provocative as his images can be, there is something missing — an element of strangeness, of difficulty, of the kind of inspiration that overrides mere cleverness.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    What really separates "Midlands" from Leone's desiccated, terse genre work is Mr. Meadows's doting attention to his characters' decency. It gives a demonstrative bittersweetness to a likable but small story.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The result is a slick, brutishly effective genre movie: “Syriana” for dummies. Which is not entirely a put-down.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The preposterousness of the story doesn’t seem like a rip-off, since the twists in the plot, for the most part, pay off nicely.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    You might, nonetheless, want to see this movie, even -- or maybe especially -- if you have seen “Billy Elliot” or “Bend It Like Beckham.” Familiarity is not always a bad thing, and if the script, by Shauna Cross, piles sports movie and coming-of-age touchstones into a veritable cairn of clichés, the cast shows enough agility and conviction to make them seem almost fresh.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The look, the rhythm and the scruffy, on-the-fly ambience of the film make it feel unusually fresh and lively. It may be the same old song, but it's also a catchy remix.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    There is a blueprint here for what should be the next wave of comedy-concert movies, but the filmmaking team has only used part of it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    “Popstar” takes aim at everything that is artificial and plastic in contemporary pop in a spirit of love rather than spite. It’s a celebration of the curious authenticity — the innocence, the sweetness, the guiltless pleasure — of music whose badness is sometimes hard to separate from its genius.

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