For 1,821 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 49% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 49% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.6 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

A.O. Scott's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Secret Sunshine
Lowest review score: 0 The Love Guru
Score distribution:
1821 movie reviews
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    The story is at once hilarious and horrific, its significance both self-evident and opaque. The same could be said of most of the Coen brothers’ movies, in which human existence and the attempt to find meaning in it are equally futile, if also sometimes a lot of fun. (For us, at least.)
    • 27 Metascore
    • 10 A.O. Scott
    The ugly smell of unexamined privilege hangs over this film like the smoke from cheap incense.
    • 20 Metascore
    • 20 A.O. Scott
    The problem -- the catastrophe -- of The Last Airbender is not in the conception but the execution. The long-winded explanations and clumsy performances are made worse by graceless effects and a last-minute 3-D conversion that wrecks whatever visual grace or beauty might have been there.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    The result is a movie that is challenging, accessible and hard to stop thinking about...But in too many recent movies intelligence is woefully undervalued, and it is this quality -- even more than its considerable beauty -- that distinguishes Little Children from its peers.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 20 A.O. Scott
    You can't get more high-concept, or less plotted, than this, and Daddy Day Care is proof.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    If it tells, in Mr. Ludin’s words, "a typical German story," the movie also offers an unusually matter-of-fact picture of the private and public effects of ordinary evil.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Amusingly gamy, an anecdotal crime film that's an antidote to the pile of overly slick robbery pictures of the past few years.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    The Simpsons Movie, in the end, is as good as an average episode of "The Simpsons." In other words, I’d be willing to watch it only -- excuse me while I crunch some numbers here -- 20 or 30 more times.
    • 93 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    The picture is more fun than it has a right to be.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 A.O. Scott
    Grace is also what defines Mr. Bahrani's filmmaking. I can't think of anything else to call the quality of exquisite attention, wry humor and wide-awake intelligence that informs every frame of this almost perfect film.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Altogether compelling.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    Glazes over faster than a Krispy Kreme doughnut, and neither is very flavorful after sitting around for a while.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    Rarely does a movie feel as leaden-footed as Iris, especially when it tries to bounce back and forth. The audience is transported between two very obvious stories and becomes slightly irritated by the grinding inevitability of both of them. As a result, Iris Murdoch gets lost in the shuffle.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    Praise will stick with you. It's more than worthy of its title.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    More often there is a frantic, compulsive quality to the action. Fanboy intoxication with the idea of formal ingenuity too often stands in for the thing itself.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 A.O. Scott
    By the end the most vivid figure on the screen is the lovable doggie who goes wherever dangling fingers are waiting to give the happy pooch a scratch.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Often very smart about being silly.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    It's undeniably a trifle, but rarely is something like this done with such skill and, well, savoir-faire.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 A.O. Scott
    As sweet, as touching, as humane a movie as you are likely to see this summer.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    This uninviting and pallid version, starring Guy Pearce, is intent on grinding all the sharp edges off the original story, in effect making the movie childproof, so no one can get hurt touching it.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    Slight and dogged; its surprises are likable but minor.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    Mostly standard-issue muddle.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Mostly it's exhilarating.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    The picture is about victims -- but it's also a great, sick rush with a kicker on the level of "The Vanishing."
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    A woozy, disconnected piece of filmmaking about drugs, rock 'n' roll and the aftermath of sex.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    The movie's tolerant, good-humored view of its characters drains it of some dramatic intensity, but Mr. Harris seems more interested in piquant, offhand moments than in big, straining confrontations.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Certainly touching, even heart-rending at times, and it mostly steers clear of the didacticism and sentimentality its subject matter often invites. But it never takes the full measure of its modest heroine, and makes her world a bit too small.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    Instead of the kind of inspired imaginative synergy that distinguished the “Lord of the Rings” and later “Harry Potter” pictures, this movie, directed by Mark Waters (“Mean Girls”), feels more like a sloppy, secondhand pander.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    Does a yeoman's job of recycling the day-old dough that passes for its story.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    None of it works. Or it works too hard. Whatever.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 A.O. Scott
    It’s a phoned-in, gutless piece of hack work that reminds you of other, better films in the same vein.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    She is the prime special effect, and a reminder that even in an era of technological overkill, movie stars matter.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    Shamelessly stirring, brandishing Mr. Gibson's anguished masculinity like a musket. It may be effective, but you leave the theater feeling used.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    You may be taken by the director's enormous enthusiasm, but the picture doesn't quite work.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    Hit and Runway is a case of the emperor's old clothes: drab, sentimental rags that desperately want to be something else.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    It's a much funnier movie than the trailer would lead you to believe; it would almost have to be. But it is just not as consistent as their previous trash wallows.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Though the narrative is spotty, and occasionally confounding, there is an epic warmth in the way it's rendered.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Has a lovely, unadorned, though distended sentimentality.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    Soul Power, as aptly and succinctly titled a movie as I have ever seen, takes you to a place where the discipline that produces great popular art is indistinguishable from the ecstasy that art creates.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 20 A.O. Scott
    About 20 minutes in, it is clear that the couple will emerge as nothing more than crabby yuppies whose articulation of their pouts sounds like the same argument over and over again.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    xXx
    Action fans will watch their adrenaline levels redline, and those not at ease with this climax-after-climax style will white knuckle their way through to the end.
    • 12 Metascore
    • 20 A.O. Scott
    A film so family-safe it feels sheathed in plastic Bubble Wrap. Unfortunately, it's not even as much fun as popping the bubbles. It doesn't matter that the film is less than 90 minutes. It still feels like a prison stretch.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 30 A.O. Scott
    This picture is mostly a lump of run-of-the-mill profanity sprinkled with a few remarks so geared toward engendering audience sympathy that you might think he was running for office -- or trying to win over a probation officer.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    When Mr. Burton's "Planet" fixes on being entertaining...it succeeds. But the picture states its social points so bluntly that it becomes slow-witted and condescending; it treats the audience as pets.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    A minor-key diversion, might play relatively well on television, where you're listening with one ear while keeping the other cocked to the phone.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Just know that you'll owe Master of the Flying Guillotine for the pleasure you'll get from viewing a venerable example of the kung fu genre.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    A thriller wrapped in heavy-duty gauze to muffle the chills.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Stuffed with hard-working actors, sleek effects and stagy period details, The Prestige, directed by Christopher Nolan from a script he wrote with his brother Jonathan, is an intricate and elaborate machine designed for the simple purpose of diversion.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 A.O. Scott
    Hot Rod might be called the poor man’s “Eagle vs. Shark” if “Eagle vs. Shark” were not already the poor man’s “Napoleon Dynamite.” It certainly lacks the conceptual purity and aesthetic integrity of the “Jackass” movies. In any case poor certainly describes the quality of the filmmaking.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    As the latest tribute -- Jim Brown’s loving documentary, Pete Seeger: The Power of Song -- makes clear, he’s still busy, still angry, still hopeful, still singing.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    Be warned: it's a downer, and a knockout.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    The movie does have its own kind of blockheaded poetry.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    Like its hero, the movie has a blunt, exuberant honesty, pulling off even its false moves with conviction and flair.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    This terrifically smart and solid piece of filmmaking lets the former Weathermen, now in their 50's and older, speak into the camera and reveal a bit of their personal histories as well as what the peace movement meant to them.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    28 Weeks Later is not for the faint of heart or the weak of stomach. It is brutal and almost exhaustingly terrifying, as any respectable zombie movie should be. It is also bracingly smart, both in its ideas and in its techniques.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Curiously exhilarating. Some of this comes from the simple thrill of witnessing something, or rather everything, done well.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    Someone deserves the grand prize for persuading David Bowie to participate in this minor drama .The movie is bland and ordinary.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 30 A.O. Scott
    Try as it might to be refined and provocative, Perfume: The Story of a Murderer never rises above the pedestrian creepiness of its conceit.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    May have been tailored just for Mr. Chan, but it still feels like off-the-rack garb. And by now, Mr. Chan deserves much better than a hand-me-down suit that smells like a rental.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 A.O. Scott
    Raunchier and somewhat more imaginative than “Hot Rod.”
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The movie may be a little too tame in the end, but at its best it is just wild enough.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Occasionally becomes pretentious and shrill -- sometimes Mr. Wright isn't aware that his material is so good that he doesn't need to comment on his characters.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 20 A.O. Scott
    Stardom makes its metaphor of 15 minutes seem like a lifetime.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    But true to its title, The Hangover goes down smoothly enough and then kicks you in the head later on, when you start to examine the sources of your laughter.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    My Sister’s Keeper takes on a very tough subject -- and has, in Anna and Kate, two pretty tough characters played by strong young actresses -- but ultimately it is too soft, too easy, and it dissolves like a tear-soaked tissue.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    Notorious settles into a curious comfort zone; it's half pop fable, half naturalistic docudrama. Not a bad movie, but nowhere near as strong as its soundtrack.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    Is this Karate Kid as good as the original? No, although it is better than the sequels. But why bother with nostalgia? It’s probably good enough.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Perhaps it's the difference in culture, but the thoughtfulness in Smell of Camphor, Fragrance of Jasmine shows that its creator isn't letting himself or his audience off the hook.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 30 A.O. Scott
    By Monday, Torque will look like a period piece with its expiration date, January 2004, prominently displayed. The inevitable movie-inspired video game will appear more realistic.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 A.O. Scott
    The movie is like spending an idle afternoon browsing, and not buying.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    While Stranger Than Fiction traffics in a bit of darkly funny existential anxiety, it also finds room for romantic fantasy and sentimental uplift.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Chabrol's droll assault on petit-bourgeois security feels like a satire of "Ordinary People" directed by Alfred Hitchcock.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    The anomalous proliferation of scenic beauty gives Mr. Nolan irony to play with, and he uses it spectacularly. The director and his gifted cinematographer, Wally Pfister, are clearly turned on by all this wasted beauty.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    No one in Jerichow is entirely deserving of sympathy, which gives the film a detached, clinical feeling underlined by the director’s habit of observing emotions rather than evoking them.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    Ms. Roth's radiance and understanding of Lucía's emotional life gives this film a touch of necessary psychological accessibility.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The brutality in the film is pervasive and often stomach turningly graphic, but what is perhaps most unnerving is the tact, patience and care with which Mr. McQueen depicts its causes and effects.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    A superficially clever, self-important and finally incoherent thriller.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    It is a chronicle of courage and sacrifice, of danger and solidarity, of heroism and futility, told with power, grace and feeling and brought alive by first-rate acting. A damn good war movie.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    What is most striking about The Spirit is how little pleasure it affords, in spite of its efforts to by sly, sexy, heartfelt and clever all at once.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    So much in this meticulous and moving film is between the lines, and almost nothing is by the book.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Dear John carefully distills selected elements of human experience and reduces them to a sweet and digestible syrup. It may not be strong medicine, but it delivers an effective, pleasing dose of pure sentiment and vicarious heartache.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    Sadly, if this movie was a fight, they'd have stopped it.
    • 14 Metascore
    • 20 A.O. Scott
    The current version, however, like its predecessor, fails as entertainment. Mr. McTiernan's remake may be lighter on its feet -- the sober-minded original was as graceful as a tap-dancing rhino -- but it is just as boring and as obvious.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 20 A.O. Scott
    A stupefying mix of action, politics and melodrama.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 10 A.O. Scott
    A witless, straining mess.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The film offers an easygoing and generous blend of wish fulfillment, vicarious luxury, wry humor and spiritual uplift, with a star, Julia Roberts, who elicits both envy and empathy.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 A.O. Scott
    A movie that is as stuffed with bogus feeling and overwrought incident as a fast-food burrito.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    You may not quite trust Mother and Child -- its soft spots and fuzzy edges give it away -- but you can believe just about everyone in it.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    Two in the Wave honors that collaboration by carefully recounting its details and arguing for its significance. The films of Truffaut and Mr. Godard stand or fall by themselves, but together they made history.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 A.O. Scott
    Nothing in the picture works. It is both overwrought and tedious, its complicated narrative bogging down in lyrical voiceover, long flashbacks and endless expository conversations between people speaking radically incompatible accents.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 20 A.O. Scott
    There's so little chemistry between Mr. Wilson and Ms. Hudson that you begin to look back on what now seems like the halcyon time of "How to Lose a Guy in 10 Days."
    • 69 Metascore
    • 100 A.O. Scott
    Its speedy, funny, happy-sad spirit is so infectious that the movie makes you feel at home in its world even if the landscape is, at first glance, unfamiliar.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 A.O. Scott
    It’s an exciting sports movie, an inspiring tale of prejudice overcome and, above all, a fascinating study of political leadership.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 20 A.O. Scott
    The picture is so predictable that the bad acting becomes a distraction.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 A.O. Scott
    The easy, complacent distance that informs much historical filmmaking is almost entirely absent from this supremely intelligent, unfailingly honest movie.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    Ms. Abt provides an unusually honest, compassionate and challenging view of contemporary youth, neither sugarcoated nor prurient.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    The fun is contagious.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The power of Ratcatcher comes from its hushed lyricism and Ms. Ramsay's talent for conveying emotional complexity.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    Has enough going on to make it a classic. You'll want to own it.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    A thoroughly modern confection, blending insouciance and sophistication, heartfelt longing and self-conscious posing with the guileless self-assurance of a great pop song. What to do for pleasure? Go see this movie, for starters.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Rock has not only done his best work as a director and screenwriter but has also made an unusually insightful and funny mainstream American movie about the predicaments of modern marriage.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    A sleek, swift and exciting adaptation of J. K. Rowling’s longest novel to date.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    As is so often the case in modest, aimless little movies like this one, it is the acting that saves Jack Goes Boating from triviality or worse.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 A.O. Scott
    Overplotted, hollow thriller.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Ms. Rapace, tiny and agile, her steely rage showing now and then the tiniest crack of vulnerability, belongs to another dimension altogether. She makes this movie good enough, but also makes you wish it were much better.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    If there is a bit more humor on display here -- some of it evidence that an element of self-conscious self-mockery is sneaking into the franchise -- there is also more violence, and, true to the film’s title, a deeper intimation of darkness. What there isn’t, as usual, is much in the way of good acting, with the decisive and impressive exception of Ms. Stewart, who can carry a close-up about as well as anyone in movies today.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    In spite of occasional gestures in the direction of political or sociological context -- interviews with anti-Aristide activists, news images of battles beyond Cité Soleil -- Mr. Leth is not, in the end, much concerned with offering an analysis of the Haitian situation. Like Lele, he'd rather have a party with the thugs.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    The plot of Sleep Dealer is a bit thin, and the performances are earnest and dutiful. But there is sufficient ingenuity in the film’s main ideas to hold your attention, and the political implications of the allegorical story are at once obvious and subtle.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    By the time the final measure of rough cosmic justice is meted out, The Square has completed a tour of moral squalor that is suspenseful, invigorating and sometimes harshly funny.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    There doesn't seem to be an original moment in the entire movie, and the score is so repetitive that it could have been downloaded directly from EnnioMorricone.com.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 20 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Baldwin's attack -- there's no better way to put it -- is unforgettable. He's the first shrunken narrator with a serial killer's swagger.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    It is a relief to encounter such exuberant and infectious silliness.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 A.O. Scott
    Tries to show it has its heart in the right place, but it's such a crude undertaking that it doesn't actually seem to have a heart at all.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    Brett Morgen’s semi-animated, semi-documentary attempt to make the ’60s cool for a new generation of kids, does the opposite. It is a narrow, glib dollop of canned history, an affirmation of received thinking rather than a challenge to it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The sweetness at the core of the raggedy low-budget romantic comedy Jump Tomorrow is hard to resist.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Engrossing and at times impressive, a pretty good movie that is disappointing to the extent that it could have been great. Is this the way the world ends? With polite applause?
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Schlöndorff calls the film "a ballad inspired by true events," and its occasional bouts of clumsiness and sentimentality are inseparable from its power.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    Might more aptly be described as Bad Kurosawa, Bad Peckinpah or Bad Leone. Which might be a way of saying that it's better-than-average Stallone. I can't quite say that it's not bad: it is bad! But not entirely in a bad way.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Not quite a biopic, not really a documentary and only loosely an adaptation, Howl does something that sounds simple until you consider how rarely it occurs in films of any kind. It takes a familiar, celebrated piece of writing and makes it come alive.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 20 A.O. Scott
    It's hard to take Passion seriously because it brings to mind the kind of shallow psychology that wouldn't be out of place in a history short about Sigmund Freud on "ABC Schoolhouse Rock."
    • 35 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    This new version is mindless hot-rodding fun, especially for those with a weakness for vintage cars hurtling down city streets, a group whose members include -- sigh -- me.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    This film is a document of hope, progress and idealism but also a reminder that the deep springs of bigotry and violence that fed a long, vicious campaign of domestic terrorism have not dried up.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    After 90 minutes of My Blueberry Nights, which pass pleasantly enough, with swirly, mood-saturated colors; lovely faces; and nice music, you may feel a bit logy yourself -- filled up, sugar-addled, but not really satisfied.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    The entire picture is a third-generation Xerox copy, in part because adapting Mr. Harris's books for the screen seems to turn directors into rigid formalists.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    The mystery of Séraphine de Senlis -- who died in a mental hospital in 1942 and whose work survives in some of the world’s leading museums -- is left intact at the end of Séraphine. Rather than trying to explain Séraphine, the film accepts her.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    There must be a name for a picture so inconsequential, in which the music provides so much of the chemistry that you get the feeling Bossa Nova would be funereal without it.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 30 A.O. Scott
    Feels like an early rehearsal for a play where all the movement is being coordinated but the underlying emotional notes have yet to be set.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 20 A.O. Scott
    So lacking in shame that it finally seems laughable.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    It is one of the most engaging, morally unsettling political thrillers in quite some time, with the extra advantage of being true.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 A.O. Scott
    A movie that is almost indecently satisfying and at the same time elusive, at once intellectually lofty -- marked by allusions to Emerson, Shakespeare and Seamus Heaney as well as Nietzsche -- and as earthy as the passionate provincial family that is its heart and cosmos and reason for being.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    One of Mr. Brisseau's subjects is the volatility of desire, the way the path of erotic curiosity can swerve from satisfaction into recrimination and confusion. A porno-philosopher in the venerable French tradition, he blends a frank appeal to the audience's nether regions with some teasing attention to its mind.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    Let It Snow is cheery, and it gets by on the energy of the actors, who may be as taken by the movie's guilelessness as audiences could be. The film's naïveté makes up for its rampant predictability.
    • 90 Metascore
    • 100 A.O. Scott
    The pleasures of this movie are abundant. The pacing is as swift as a speeding bullet. There are wonderfully evoked lived-in San Francisco locations... And there are splendid set pieces that showcase the perpetually-underrated Don Siegel's great skill a director. This film is efficient, unpretentious and much wittier and more stylish than your average cop movie.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    Despicable Me cannot be faulted for lack of trying. If anything, it tries much too hard, stuffing great gobs of second-rate action, secondhand humor and warmed-over sentiment into every nook and cranny of its relentlessly busy 3-D frames.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    Fastidious and smart, and Ms. Swinton's fixated intensity isn't ever remote; we're always aware of how deeply she's feeling. Her work is magnificent.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    Makes its points gently; the picture presents its socially conscious messages as if they were written in the sand, on the beaches where Felix would probably prefer to frolic.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Broderick and Mr. DeVito look tired and out of sorts, and you can hardly blame them, given the picture's inept, curdled mixture of sappiness and crude humor.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    And yet something vital here works. There are, come to think of it, a lot of little things.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 30 A.O. Scott
    The picture, which fails to achieve its ambitions or to fulfill our expectations, is ultimately worse than a violent piece of hack work, in which the director isn't interested in displaying his integrity -- or taste. You'd be better off downloading the trailer: a much more convincing piece of storytelling.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    Despite its artistry, it seems to last nearly a millennium.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    The movie turns into a cobweb of tricky spins and twists that seems like a hip-hop version of "Ruthless People."
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    It feels willed, aggressive and unconvincing -- clammy rather than cool -- in a way that suggests artistic frustration rather than discovery. The water shortage may be a metaphor for the director’s creative desiccation, which his admirers can only hope is temporary.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 A.O. Scott
    What we see on screen is a lumbering, flat-footed fancy-dress melodrama.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 20 A.O. Scott
    Backstage isn't as good as the rap documentaries "Rhyme and Reason" and "The Show," but it still casts a keen, observant eye...on this world.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 0 A.O. Scott
    A worthless piece of garbage.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 30 A.O. Scott
    Pallid compared with the flaming id of television's "Will and Grace," the happy swizzle stick Jack, who's all appetites. When series television is more entertaining than a series of short independent films, that's something to worry about.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Reiner and Mr. Kudlow may not quite merit full-metal glory, but they don't deserve oblivion either, and Anvil! The Story of Anvil makes both a case and a place for their band.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    The film, not unsurprisingly for a holiday- (and football-) season release from a major Hollywood studio, plays this story straight down the middle, shedding nuance and complication in favor of maximum uplift.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Sensitive, modest, thrillingly self-assured first feature by So Yong Kim, was one of the standouts of the 2006 Sundance Film Festival -- exactly the kind of thoughtful, independent work one hopes to find there and too rarely does.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The Orphanage, a diverting, overwrought ghost story from Spain, relies on basic and durable horror movie techniques.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    There are worse things than loutish, laddish cool, and as a series of poses and stunts, Sherlock Holmes is intermittently diverting.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    When Suddenly finds its soul in the last half-hour, the title begins to make a lovely sort of sense.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 30 A.O. Scott
    Like a zombie picture directed by one of the undead.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    Like a half-empty glass of Coke that's been sitting out for a couple of days; sure, it looks like cola, but one sip tells you exactly what's missing.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    The curious thing about The Visitor is that even as it goes more or less where you think it will, it still manages to surprise you along the way.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    Manages to be fairly entertaining in that exhausting, rackety, late-summer-kiddie-movie way.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    From 300 hours of material, Mr. Longley has created a collage of images, sounds and characters, an intimate, partial portrait of an unraveling nation -- a portrait that gains power partly by virtue of its incompleteness.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The obsessive crosshatching of allusion, spoof and homage that gives Grindhouse its texture is the product of a highly refined generational sensibility.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    Mongol -- or, as I prefer to think of it, "Genghis Khan: The Early Years" -- is a big, ponderous epic, its beautifully composed landscape shots punctuated by thundering hooves and bloody, slow-motion battle sequences.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    O
    In trying to make "Othello" more lifelike and bring it down to a younger audience -- in effect, to make it more democratic -- the adaptation has rendered the material artless.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    The movie is staged like a pit stop -- Reindeer Games goes from being fun to being laughable.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    The thicket of relationships that the director, Hiner Saleem, has created and weaves his cast and camera through is so invitingly hotblooded and crowded with hilariously melodramatic incident that the snowbanks are not nearly as forbidding as they initially seem.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Frequently brilliant, finally baffling film.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    The problem with the baroque and overripe Tattoo Bar is that everybody has a past. And there's so much crosscutting to those pasts in flashbacks, it's hard to keep track of whose past you're witnessing.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 10 A.O. Scott
    Few people other than future airline passengers should be subjected to such misery.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    A Christmas Carol -- I mean the source material, without a corporate possessive attached to it -- remains among the most moving works of holiday literature, and Mr. Zemeckis has remained true to its finest sentiments. He is an innovator, but his traditionalism is what makes this movie work.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    A bit of a puzzle. This is a good thing, since most movies plop down in easily recognizable categories and stay there, troubling neither their own intellectual inertia nor that of the audience.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    Serves up its scattershot plots as if they were lined up on a menu, moving from appetizer to entree: there are more intrigues here than in the court of the Medicis.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    I hesitate, given the early date and the project's modesty, to call Into Great Silence one of the best films of the year. I prefer to think of it as the antidote to all of the others.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The real flaw is that the movie's best features -- the aching clarity of its central performances -- threaten to be lost in a wilderness of metaphor and mystification.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 A.O. Scott
    The best nondocumentary American feature made yet about the war in Iraq.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    One of the most subtle and inspired comedies you'll see this year.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    It is intermittently engrossing, though a little overextended for the deadpan approach that Mr. Bitomsky uses.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    May not be perfect, but it honors its source and captures the key elements -- the humor and good sense, as well as the sheer narrative exuberance -- that have made White’s book a classic.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Once you have seen a sheep munching on a bloody human leg, you may think twice about your next leg of lamb. On the other hand maybe you'll be inspired to seek vengeance. To provoke one of these responses -- vegetarianism or a defiant meat eating -- may be the point of this odd, amusing film.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    A goofy and remarkable film.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    It's in the small touches that this movie comes alive, and it's rare that directors can pull off this kind of thing.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    It is a heartbreaking film, and cruelty sometimes seems to be not only its subject but its method. Like the child on a high cliff that is one of its recurring images, the film walks up to the edge of hopelessness and pauses there, waiting to see what happens next.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    The trouble with movies like those in the "Friday" series is that their success can lead to a need to inflate their importance, inviting pretentious descriptions like "folkloric" when "Friday" is much closer to chitlin circuit comedy.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    The entertainment formula behind this short and nasty movie - devised according to someone's idea of what teenage boys with the guile, the facial hair or the "guardian" to gain admission to an R-rated movie are likely to enjoy - is sloppy and simple.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    It is a reasonably skillful exercise in genre and style, a well-made vessel containing nothing in particular, though some of its features - European setting, slow pacing, full-frontal female nudity - are more evocative of the art house than of the multiplex.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    A diverting if not terribly original on-the-cheap horror film.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 20 A.O. Scott
    The film falls far short of its goals, but it is a classic of sorts. It belongs in that Blockbuster on Mount Olympus, where pristine new copies of "I Changed My Sex," "Dracula's Dog," "Blackenstein" and "Battlefield Earth" play constantly.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    It's a mirror and a portrait, and a movie as necessary and nourishing as your next meal.
    • 17 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    The humor is coarse and occasionally funny. The archly bombastic score, by Edward Sheamur, is the only thing you might call witty. But happily, Jennifer Coolidge and Fred Willard show up, as the White Bitch and Aslo the Lion, to add some easy, demented class.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Does a thoughtful job of streamlining the bloody realities -- both literal and psychological -- of China's Cultural Revolution into roughly two hours of film.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    The mildly xenophobic humor includes one of the few inventive mime insults seen in a movie; Eurotrip may be stupid, but it's not dumb.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    This breathless demi-noir has so much bounce that we barely get any time to mull over the gaping holes in its moth-eaten plot. It is competent but extremely slight.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    Dour and bleak, yet this melodrama -- which doesn't amount to much of anything -- may stick with you.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Shyamalan may be the only mainstream director hankering for success with a need to understate; he is like Shaq without the tattoos. The result is a mastery of craft that may leave some hungry for more.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    While impressively made, this impassive and cold feature fails, in a spectacular fashion, to deliver the thrills.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    It works in so many ways except for the script, which sounds laughable. And sadly, when Lost and Delirious trips over its own two feet, it is laughable. It needs to follow Paulie's advice and rage more.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Nearly every melodramatic impulse has been suppressed in favor of a calm precision that serves both to intensify and delay the emotional impact of the film’s climactic disclosures.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    An often watchable, though goofy and lurid, blast of a costume drama set in the late 15th century.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 20 A.O. Scott
    A weak-witted comedy.
    • 21 Metascore
    • 20 A.O. Scott
    This bloated spectacle has all the get-up-and-go of one of the legendary late-era Elvis Presley concerts. The picture feels longer than Presley's career and as irrelevant as he was by the end.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    Awkward, obvious and sporadically -- very sporadically -- amusing.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 10 A.O. Scott
    A dreary crash of malapropisms and slapstick maimings wrapped very loosely around a murder mystery.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    The movie wants desperately to function as a romantic tragedy, with passions glancing off the thoughtless pursuit of satisfaction. But Vatel can't really define the differences between the two; it settles into a period funk, as shallow as the court popinjays it seeks to expose.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Brazenly self-confident in its refusal to pander to the imagined sensitivity of its audience. In this it differs notably from Albert Brooks's "Looking for Comedy in the Muslim World," which approached some of the same topics with misplaced thoughtfulness and tact.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 20 A.O. Scott
    Our judgments, in any case, may be superfluous, since the director, Mathieu Kassovitz, has already publicly described it as "pure violence and stupidity."
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    Not especially good, but there is enough rough artistry in Mr. O’Connor’s direction to make you wish the film were better.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 A.O. Scott
    It's one of the rare films for which a blooper reel would be redundant.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    The art is lacking, but the material is remarkable enough to make up for pedestrian filmmaking.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    Reign Over Me uses the rhythms and moods of comedy to explore, and also to contain, overpowering feelings of loss, anger and hurt. And like that earlier movie ("The Upside of Anger"), this one is maddeningly uneven.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    It's an interesting, maddening mess -- not a terrible movie, and by no means a dull one.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    This film, Mr. Caetano's feature-length directorial debut, has an emotional integrity that's concise and direct.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    Probably the worst thing you can say about Hollywood Ending is that it has one: it turns out that Mr. Allen wasn't being ironic after all, he just made a comedy that feels ironclad.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The blossoming of her ambition, as much as her love life, drives the story forward, and turns Coco Before Chanel into a costume drama worthy of the name.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Herzog’s film is a pulpy, glorious mess. Its maniacal unpredictability is such a blast that it reminds you just how tidy and dull most crime thrillers are these days.
    • 14 Metascore
    • 10 A.O. Scott
    The only people who could be surprised at this movie will be those who wandered into the wrong multiplex theater by mistake.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 A.O. Scott
    Tacky and disposable.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    October Country feels at once personal and objective, a fascinating hybrid of two important tendencies in the modern documentary.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    A mellow dream of a movie that's an acquired taste. It's attractive because of the oblique way that Mr. Wenders ambles through a murder mystery that's stronger on characterization than on plot.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Relax, the staging of the action sequences is as viciously elegant as you've been primed to expect, though there is a dispiriting more-of-the-same aspect to the picture.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    The Exploding Girl can also make you feel bad about wishing that she were just a little more interesting.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    Plays like something picked up at a vintage store; you can see all the greasy fingerprints from those who have handled it before.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    X
    Has the sleepy feel of an urban fairy tale, but getting there is a long trip.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    The picture has a daring attention-span deficit and an epic silliness that can be awesomely entertaining.
    • 11 Metascore
    • 30 A.O. Scott
    It's an oddity that will be avoided by millions of people, this new Pinocchio. Osama bin Laden could attend a showing in Times Square and be confident of remaining hidden.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    There are no simple answers or obvious conclusions to be gleaned from this movie, which, like its soundtrack, is both sad and vibrant, meandering and formally sure-footed. It is an exciting debut, and a film that, without exaggeration or false modesty, finds interest and feeling in the world just as it is.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The movie's advertising tagline ("Starsky & Hutch — they're the Man") needs to be amended. The film belongs, completely and utterly, to Snoop Dogg.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    When the biggest compliment you can pay a picture is that it is professional and not smug, there's a little something missing, like invention.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    The characters and situations are interesting enough, and the filmmaking is sufficiently skilled to provide a measure of reasonably thoughtful entertainment.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    World on a Wire, while too slow and diffuse to count as a lost masterpiece, is valuable in expanding our sense of what Fassbinder could do and is also a source of much visual and intellectual pleasure in its own right.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    Guilty of behaving like a petty thievery corporation; it steals from so many other sources that we're forced to realize that it has little of its own to offer. As such, it can't help but fail to meet expectations, given the talents involved.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    Nimble and self-assured as Mr. Daniels’s direction may be, he could not make you believe in “Precious” unless you were able to believe in Precious herself. You will.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    This movie incites curiosity tinged with confusion and irritation. It bristles with interesting ideas — about friendship and freakishness, honesty and anger — and intriguing characters, all of which may blossom in later episodes.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    A giggly cocktail, though it's more foam than drink.
    • 32 Metascore
    • 20 A.O. Scott
    All hope is lost for those trapped in theaters with this picture.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    A memoir, a history lesson, a combat picture, a piece of investigative journalism and an altogether amazing film.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Slight, charming and refreshingly candid little picture.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Block has put his parents’ life, and his own, into this film with such warmth and candor that it may take more than one viewing to recognize it as a work of art.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Peck's gambit works, and the result is a great film and a great performance.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    The movie is full of juices that give it a healthy, pungent flow.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    The screenplay, by John Brancato and Michael Ferris, tosses out a few chewy bits of B-movie wit, most of them supplied by Mr. Jones, who expresses the ambivalence of an African-American visiting the motherland through a series of bitter jokes.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    Lacks more than subtext: it barely has text. At times, the picture seems to have been edited with a blowtorch. But it gets the job done efficiently and swiftly.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    The filmmakers know how potent the material is, and they don't hammer away at the obvious.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 30 A.O. Scott
    Perhaps the directors are under the delusion that the dodging and leaping can make up for an ending that leaves the cast members of "Killer" adrift and nearly scratching their heads in puzzlement.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    There's more to everyone here than we're initially led to think. The Good Girl is like a neurotically charged post-millennial take on the trailer-park comedies that Jonathan Demme once claimed for himself.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    The brilliance of Stuff and Dough is that it wraps this powerful, disturbing drama in an anecdote from ordinary life. As is often the case in recent Romanian movies, the acting is so accomplished as to be invisible.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    There is a grungy high spirit during the first third of this film, but then it dissipates like a mist from an aerosol can.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    Seems to just drift to a close rather than pronounce an end. This can be a result of wrestling with a daunting subject and not being up to its demands.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    So campy it reflexively sends an elbow to its own ribs.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    After watching the fascinating and compelling new documentary Lost in La Mancha, you may forever wonder how it is that movies are made at all.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Modest in scope, but it feels complete, fully inhabited, in a way that more overtly ambitious movies rarely do.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    Will Finn and Tess find the treasure before the bad guys? Will they put aside their differences and rekindle their love? Yes to both questions! I haven’t spoiled anything, by the way. But perhaps I’ve saved you some trouble.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    Though Mr. Noé displays prodigious filmmaking technique, his punk-operatic meditation on life, love, anger and -- most important -- guilt is superficially inventive, but singularly adolescent.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    Both refreshing and confusing, the film equivalent of an ice cream headache.
    • 24 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    A bad-taste comedy with a heart.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    Not that Cairo, Nest of Spies is meant to be a thriller, but even as a self-consciously anachronistic knockabout farce it rarely rises to the level of wit, either verbal or physical.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 10 A.O. Scott
    You'll see better film on ponds.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    In spite of its sometimes tiresome, sometimes amusing lewdness, follows a gee-whiz romantic-comedy formula that would not be out of place on the Disney Channel.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 100 A.O. Scott
    In spite of its modest scale, tactful manner and potentially dowdy subject matter, is packed nearly to bursting with rich meaning and deep implication.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    The storytelling and the visual style are rarely more than workmanlike, and the big scenes arrive punctually and are played with minimal nuance.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    May feel redundant, but it is stylish and intelligent.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Not everything that happens in Fighting entirely makes sense -- it’s a fable, after all, and a fable doesn't necessarily have to -- but it breathes with a rough, exuberant realism that you rarely see in movies of its kind.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 20 A.O. Scott
    The stripped-down narrative is almost an apology for the ludicrous story -- but it's just not enough of one.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 20 A.O. Scott
    Does it have to be so witless, so stupid, so openly contemptuous of the very audience it’s supposed to be pandering to?
    • 57 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    The performances give the movie more flavor and life than the situation does; it often feels like prechewed Bubble Yum.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    Half a movie at best. The broad humor at times derails Mr. Murphy's performances, but the movie provides a vehicle for him to display his reach.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    In the end Babel, like that tower in the book of Genesis, is a grand wreck, an incomplete monument to its own limitless ambition. But it is there, on the landscape, a startling and imposing reality. It's a folly, and also, perversely, a wonder.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    Silent Waters is several different movies, and most of them feel negligible and meandering, until the film finally packs a wallop.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 0 A.O. Scott
    The law of diminishing returns is enforced so stringently that the movie succeeds not only in negating its own comedy, but its very being.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Has the advantage of being an unusually good superhero picture. Or at least -- since it certainly has its problems -- a superhero movie that's good in unusual ways.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    Except for the access the director, David Teboul, had to Mr. Saint Laurent's inner circle, "Times" wouldn't be out of place on A&E.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 A.O. Scott
    The most voluptuous comic-book movie ever made.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 20 A.O. Scott
    Almost creates a sense of dread as you sit watching its raft of aimless, self-absorbed neurotics clang into one another.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    Amusing but extremely derivative.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    No-Good Men, Foolish Choices and Birth on the Floor of a Wal-Mart.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    So what kind of a movie is Crash? A frustrating movie: full of heart and devoid of life; crudely manipulative when it tries hardest to be subtle; and profoundly complacent in spite of its intention to unsettle and disturb.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    So beautifully realized as a mood piece that it takes a while for a slight disappointment to register.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 10 A.O. Scott
    A Viagra suppository for compulsive action fetishists and a movie that may not only be dumb in itself, but also the cause of dumbness in others.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    When it clicks, the picture should shock you into laughter -- enough to make you wish it were better and applaud its efforts anyway.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    It is for the most part a jumpy, suspenseful caper, full of narrow escapes, improbable reversals and complicated intrigue. But it has a sinister, shadowy undertow, an intimation of dread that lingers after Irving's game is up.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    The problem with We Own the Night is that it mistakes sentiment for profundity, and takes its ideas about character and fate more seriously than it takes its characters and their particular fates. “I feel light as a feather,” Bobby says in a crucial scene, at which point the movie starts to sink like a stone.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 60 A.O. Scott
    After a while the humorless solemnity of The Rocket stifles any interesting sense of Maurice Richard as a character. The hockey sequences are nicely done, though, and give a reasonably good sense of what a great player he was.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    More of a hoot than any picture dealing with the bloody, protracted fight between the Soviet Army and the Afghan mujahedeen has any right to be.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    Volver, full of surprises and reversals, unfolds with breathtaking ease and self-confidence. It is in some ways a smaller, simpler film than either "Talk to Her" or "Bad Education," choosing to tell its story without flashbacks or intricate parallel plots, but it is no less the work of a master.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    May be simple, but it's also simple-minded; this is, after all, a movie determined to transform its Rebel soldier heroes into men of the people, making it as neglectful of politics as last summer's "Patriot," which evaded that nasty issue of slavery during the America Revolution.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 A.O. Scott
    The movie is smart in small ways, yet an underachiever in big ones -- but it will probably play very well on television. On the big screen, it's distended and diffuse.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    Dan in Real Life is neither wildly farcical nor mockingly cruel, but rather, for the most part, winningly gentle and observant.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 A.O. Scott
    Mr. Leconte gives this meeting of opposites in Claude Klotz's script a lovely, sportive élan, instead of making it register as lumpy, obvious polemics.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 A.O. Scott
    Who would have expected Ms. Zellweger --- and Miramax -- to come through in a musical? And it's one of the few Christmas entertainments to run under two hours. Who couldn't love that?
    • 43 Metascore
    • 50 A.O. Scott
    Not for the faint of heart, the movie is unsettling and startlingly true to life. At least that’s how it seemed to me. To the minors I happened to be accompanying, it seemed to be reasonably good fun.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 A.O. Scott
    In spite of its raw, explicit moments, the film is at heart a sturdy morality tale about innocence and corruption, wealth and want, sex and power.

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