Ben Kenigsberg

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For 378 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 33% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 60% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ben Kenigsberg's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 53
Highest review score: 100 Inherent Vice
Lowest review score: 0 Date Movie
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 54 out of 378
378 movie reviews
    • 57 Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    Roos forecasts and explains every development with a title card, a device not unlike having someone yammering in your ear throughout the entire feature run time. In a more self-effacing director's commentary, he might have asked us, at least, to forgive the pun.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    Muddy sound contributes to the atmosphere of confusion, while the script (credited to the director, Nick Gaglia, along with Mr. Gallagher and Ms. Donohue) goes nowhere.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    Although independently funded, it was directed by a longtime collaborator of Mr. Kamen’s with the clear purpose of getting the word out about the product.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    This is crudely mounted, earnest advocacy, getting its points across at any cost.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    The Hero of Color City cannily distills the children’s movie to its lowest common denominator: bright colors flashing on screen.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    Mr. Farina gives Authors Anonymous a sharpness it otherwise lacks.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    The narration promises surprises (“This story may challenge what you think you know about the roles men and women play in Mormon homes”), but the movie might have started by examining its straw-man conception of the audience.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    Based on characters created by Rodriguez's then-seven-year-old son, Racer Max, the film doesn't belong in wide release. It belongs on a refrigerator door, alongside "100%" spelling tests, old lunch menus, and notices from the PTA.
    • 33 Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    The logistics of raising money and securing permits for the cause are not the most compelling or irreverent subject. The movie’s goal is straightforward advocacy.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    Cartoonish in its depiction of class disparities, A Little Game gains some subtlety from its performers: Mr. Abraham, an old pro, does fine work alongside Ms. Ballard, a newcomer.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    For a film about mouthwatering cuisine, it offers only fleeting delectable sensations.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    Despite eclectic casting and occasional experiments with objective camera, the director, David Gelb (“Jiro Dreams of Sushi”), can’t breathe similar life into this risible mix of pseudoscientific hokum and supernatural freakouts.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    The absence of laughs can’t be blamed on a lack of talent.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    What Ouija lacks in wit and originality, it makes up in volume — a trademark of the “Transformers” director Michael Bay, who is one of the producers.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    There's no guiding power at work here; it's Evolution without a shred of intelligent design.
    • 28 Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    Less methodical and witty than its predecessors, Patient Zero often turns its infected characters into mindless, lurching zombies.
    • 29 Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    There’s a way to tell this story that wouldn’t come across as soggy or manipulative. However well intentioned, Louder Than Words doesn’t find that tone.
    • 26 Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    Tourism is what it has to sell.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    Flashbacks and fantasy sequences undercut the claustrophobic atmosphere. What’s left is amateurish play acting — pointless for anyone who hasn’t seen “Portrait of Jason” and redundant for those who have.
    • 22 Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    While the oafish men come off poorly, the treatment of women as nothing more than schemers and monstrous Martha Stewart clones seems woefully past its expiration date.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    Unfortunately, poor execution prevents the movie from achieving an authentic throwback feel. Although the principal cast members are Broadway veterans, here they struggle with technological and tonal issues.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    This superficial movie plays like a fashion shoot with robes.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    The movie finally undermines all pretensions of satire with its geeky eagerness to subvert expectations.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    Laugh Killer Laugh is a tired parody that seems to have been constructed from received notions of noir and mob movies. Even the jazzy score sounds like an affectation.
    • 19 Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    [An] inert, exasperatingly proportioned phantasmagoria from Roland Joffé.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    Tiger Lily Road aims for the bleak humor of a Coen brothers film, but a jaunty sitcom score spoils the tone. There’s barely an action that doesn’t strain credulity.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    The scariest thing in the movie is a cameo by Scott Baio.
    • 18 Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    Saving Christmas seems determined to win any perceived war on Christmas through brute force.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 30 Ben Kenigsberg
    Jessabelle is depressingly rote.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 25 Ben Kenigsberg
    Devil’s Knot is an inert exercise, visually and dramatically on par with "Drew Peterson: Untouchable."

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