Ben Kenigsberg
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For 216 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 36% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 57% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 9.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ben Kenigsberg's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 50
Highest review score: 100 The Strange Little Cat
Lowest review score: 0 Date Movie
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 53 out of 216
  2. Negative: 41 out of 216
216 movie reviews
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Ben Kenigsberg
    In its humor, its fairy tale origins and the characters’ rounded features, it plays more like a vintage Disney work, only nimbler and freer.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 91 Ben Kenigsberg
    Above all, Frances Ha is a wry and moving portrait of friendship, highlighting the way that two people who know everything about each other can nevertheless grow apart as their needs change.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Ben Kenigsberg
    As withholding as it may be in terms of narrative, Stranger places rare faith in the viewer’s visual sense. Guiraudie presents his widescreen long takes with little inflection, conjuring suspense simply from the sounds of crackling leaves and other hallmarks of the natural (or is it au naturel?) realm.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Ben Kenigsberg
    An exhilarating, four-hour immersion in life at the University Of California campus.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 100 Ben Kenigsberg
    Mr. Zürcher has concocted something intimate yet otherworldly with this highly original debut.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 91 Ben Kenigsberg
    Like its narrative, this gripping film rarely veers in the expected directions — and is never easy to pin down.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 83 Ben Kenigsberg
    While it’s heartbreaking that the movie never got made (son Brontis Jodorowsky, who would have played Paul Atreides, is particularly poignant imagining his alternate life as a superstar), Jodorowsky’s Dune posits that the raw materials nevertheless left an enduring mark on cinematic sci-fi, providing the basis for famous aspects of "Alien," "Star Wars," and "Contact."
    • 78 Metascore
    • 91 Ben Kenigsberg
    The Last Of The Unjust is demanding but fascinating, both as history and as an intellectual volley on the lure of power, the ambiguities of perspective, and the difficulty of claiming moral high ground in a context where matters of life and death are so precarious.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 83 Ben Kenigsberg
    Unlikely as it may seem, though, Blue Jasmine finds Allen charting bona fide new territory.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 90 Ben Kenigsberg
    The film is both a generous primer on the band, which grew out of the punk movement in Leeds, England, in 1977, and a celebration of its longevity.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Ben Kenigsberg
    The Case Against 8 functions as a valuable record of the nuts-and-bolts conference room side of advocacy — an aspect of civil rights work not often seen on screen.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Ben Kenigsberg
    As a polemic, Dirty Wars is provocative and productively depressing, raising doubts about the effectiveness of military missions that have the potential to create ideological enemies, as well as the degree to which elected officials can—or are willing to—place checks on secret ops. (Obama gets no more points than Bush in any of the matters discussed.)
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Ben Kenigsberg
    The Lunchbox ultimately registers as a too-hesitant portrayal of hesitancy, and its pleasures are largely incidental.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Ben Kenigsberg
    This is all fascinating for art-history buffs, and while a documentary is the ideal vehicle for illustrating Jenison’s process, Tim’s Vermeer plays more like an extended PBS special than it does a movie.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 67 Ben Kenigsberg
    Basically, Is The Man Who Is Tall Happy? amounts to two men having a mellow discussion about the nature of ideas; it’s formally limited, yet wide-ranging in its material and ambitions. Call it a case of cognitive dissonance.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 67 Ben Kenigsberg
    Rush, in other words, is a foursquare sportsmanship movie, offering little in the way of surprises but plenty of earnest, satisfying thrills.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 58 Ben Kenigsberg
    Knotty and tense for most of its running time, Omar becomes muddled in its closing minutes, conflating personal and political treachery.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 58 Ben Kenigsberg
    The end of Le Week-End reveals it to be the thoroughly ordinary melodrama a description suggests — a portrait of former ’60s fire-starters who are perfectly happy to settle for embers.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Ben Kenigsberg
    Known for his genre pastiches, the director, Álex de la Iglesia (“El Crimen Perfecto”), rarely lets the pace flag, and the buddy comedy, gross-out humor and horror elements make for a harmonious mix.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Ben Kenigsberg
    Mr. Chan’s skill with actors — particularly with Ms. Mei and Mr. Pang’s persuasive, easygoing banter — compensates for the story’s limitations.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Ben Kenigsberg
    The Aristocrats is a veritable talent show itself, albeit one that feels inescapably slight. To rejigger another ancient joke: The food at this place isn't terrible. But the portions are really small.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Ben Kenigsberg
    The Raid 2 takes a substantially different tack from that of its 2011 predecessor, adding a convoluted plot and only intermittently attending to the sort of acrobatic ass-kicking for which the original became a global smash.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 50 Ben Kenigsberg
    Those looking for a refresher course on the workings of the food chain should be in heaven. All others may yearn for a sushi break.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Ben Kenigsberg
    The entire film unfolds in a recognizable register of ominous hesitation; the results are a bit schematic but nevertheless hit on something real.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 70 Ben Kenigsberg
    Director Kirby Dick (Derrida) shapes the movie in such a way as to leave everyone flummoxed.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 50 Ben Kenigsberg
    Ironically for a movie about the ratings value of shock, Évocateur suffers from its own lack of red meat.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 50 Ben Kenigsberg
    Develops into a lively but simpleminded valentine to liberal tolerance.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 42 Ben Kenigsberg
    The relentless contrast of banality with horror seems to be Wheatley’s signature move, and like his "Kill List" (2011), Sightseers can claim a sizable fan base, especially in its native U.K. But the humor here, ironically, doesn’t travel well.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 58 Ben Kenigsberg
    While it’s heartening in one sense to see this youthful, offbeat take on two men’s determination to stay eternally fresh, there’s something about the ease with which the characters reorder their lives that makes Land Ho! seem both a little slight and a little precious.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Ben Kenigsberg
    Often has the feel of a film-school exercise in which the object is to wring maximum suspense from rudimentary tools.

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