Ben Kenigsberg

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For 426 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 32% higher than the average critic
  • 7% same as the average critic
  • 61% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 8.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Ben Kenigsberg's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 54
Highest review score: 100 Inherent Vice
Lowest review score: 0 Date Movie
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 59 out of 426
426 movie reviews
    • 42 Metascore
    • 80 Ben Kenigsberg
    Lost River ponders people and places left behind in the name of progress. Slyly political, it observes the mortgage crisis through a warped looking glass. The cinematographer, Benoît Debie, finds a perverse beauty in the decline.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Ben Kenigsberg
    The Son of Joseph can be trying in its whimsy, yet it builds to a lovely finale that evokes the Bible, the French Resistance and the surreal.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Ben Kenigsberg
    The insights the movie has aren’t exceptional; this stranger-than-fiction series of events is enough.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Ben Kenigsberg
    The bitterly funny, multistrand Involuntary, from 2008, is a step forward in the director’s ambition.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Ben Kenigsberg
    In its humor, its fairy tale origins and the characters’ rounded features, it plays more like a vintage Disney work, only nimbler and freer.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Ben Kenigsberg
    A generous and briskly entertaining doc.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Ben Kenigsberg
    Whatever reservations it prompts, the film is innovative, original, and queasily effective.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Ben Kenigsberg
    As withholding as it may be in terms of narrative, Stranger places rare faith in the viewer’s visual sense. Guiraudie presents his widescreen long takes with little inflection, conjuring suspense simply from the sounds of crackling leaves and other hallmarks of the natural (or is it au naturel?) realm.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Ben Kenigsberg
    The entire film unfolds in a recognizable register of ominous hesitation; the results are a bit schematic but nevertheless hit on something real.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Ben Kenigsberg
    The North Korea scenes are often very funny, with many of the jokes coming at the expense of the fish-out-of-water visitors.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Ben Kenigsberg
    As philosophy, Mr. Nobody seems sillier than it is profound. But in a parallel reality, more movies would have this degree of insane ambition.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Ben Kenigsberg
    Those who want to see Armstrong sweat may leave disappointed. Calm and seemingly well rehearsed in interviews, Armstrong shrugs off years of public statements without ever seeming truly remorseful.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 70 Ben Kenigsberg
    It shows how the lingering disputes of war ripple through lives after guns have ostensibly been laid down.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Ben Kenigsberg
    Audrie & Daisy is strongest when it investigates what it regards as shortcomings of justice, for reasons technical and implied.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Ben Kenigsberg
    The real achievement here is in going beyond the buzzwords of newscasts and talking points to convey a sense of what’s happening on the ground — and to give it a sense of urgency.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 70 Ben Kenigsberg
    Antarctic Edge illustrates its points effectively, providing vivid evidence of how shrinking ice at the South Pole affects climates across the globe.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Ben Kenigsberg
    This debut feature from the Spanish-born director Miguel Llansó can’t claim a coherent mythology, but it has a lo-fi charm and humor.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Ben Kenigsberg
    Entertaining enough that it leaves one wishing for more in the way of android mythology—a pint-sized Blade Runner or A.I. The screenplay goes on autopilot, grinding toward a happy ending just when it has a shot at something darker and more memorable.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 70 Ben Kenigsberg
    The fates of several of the movie’s bitcoin entrepreneurs are unlikely to send viewers rushing to exchange their dollars. But The Rise and Rise of Bitcoin nevertheless functions as an entertaining portrait of the unshakable optimism that governs what’s been called a financial Wild West.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 70 Ben Kenigsberg
    The Hand That Feeds is an effective portrayal of the intricacies of activism — and of a situation in which victories seem all too brief.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 70 Ben Kenigsberg
    Casting Cassel as a ruthless villain might seem like a cliche, but Kleiman uses him counterintuitively, locating an avuncular, calming quality in the actor.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 70 Ben Kenigsberg
    It is a summer sequel worth its salt, a brisk exercise in suspense and high-gloss mayhem.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Ben Kenigsberg
    Find Me Guilty is overlong and often sitcomy, but it's also pleasantly old-school, with a tone, soundtrack, and even a title-card font that suggest a mellow but not senile Woody Allen.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Ben Kenigsberg
    Davis strives to keep himself out of the film, favoring a harrowing yet compassionate you-are-there aesthetic that underscores the hardship of the migrant workers' struggles.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 70 Ben Kenigsberg
    It’s both a credit to, and a shortcoming of, the movie that it suggests an illustrated bibliography. It makes you want to stop watching and, instead, read or reread all of the pieces mentioned.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 70 Ben Kenigsberg
    The Case Against 8 functions as a valuable record of the nuts-and-bolts conference room side of advocacy — an aspect of civil rights work not often seen on screen.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Ben Kenigsberg
    While Peace Officer could offer more information, what is here is disturbing and sometimes eye-opening.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 70 Ben Kenigsberg
    As a late-summer caper movie, it hits the spot. The film offers the intriguing contrast of actors and a director (Daniel Schechter) taking a different approach to known material.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 70 Ben Kenigsberg
    McCullin is not a groundbreaking documentary, but it wears its conventional format well, taking its cues (and its power) from the photographs themselves.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 70 Ben Kenigsberg
    Known for his genre pastiches, the director, Álex de la Iglesia (“El Crimen Perfecto”), rarely lets the pace flag, and the buddy comedy, gross-out humor and horror elements make for a harmonious mix.

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