Betsy Sharkey
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For 556 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 62% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 36% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 4.4 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Betsy Sharkey's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Rango
Lowest review score: 0 Nothing Left to Fear
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 30 out of 556
556 movie reviews
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    As good as Worthington, Chastain, Moretz and Morgan can be as they try to untangle the morass and the menace - and get caught up in it - they just can't quite pull it off. The real killer, sadly, is the script.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    The film doesn't have nearly the bite - ferocious or delicious - that any self-respecting vampire movie really should. It's as if all the life has drained away.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    We have a fumbling and fawning - if sincere - tribute to the living legend and a director who has never seemed more out of his element.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    W.E., Madonna's second go at directing a feature film, leaves one wishing she'd find other creative outlets for those times when she's bored with the pop-star life.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    When the filmmakers move into Nobbs' isolation, though, the movie flags - a surprise given Garcia's excellent work on HBO's minimalist personality study "In Treatment," on which he wrote and directed extensively.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    This is a movie that leaves you wanting more. To care more, to cry more, to love more.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    That John Carter is so hit and miss, and miss, and miss is unfortunate on any number of levels.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    Mostly Lockout is lost in space.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    Like Freeway, the lovable stray dog at the center of this very teary comedy, Darling Companion has lost its way. Even the marquee ensemble anchored by Diane Keaton, Dianne Wiest, Kevin Kline and Richard Jenkins is not enough to rescue this motley mutt of a movie.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    The film's single saving grace is Turner, who channels that legendary Catholic guilt like there is no tomorrow.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    Rather than the engaging enlightenment of the source, the film becomes bloated by confusion.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    Starts imploding long before the massive asteroid hurtling toward Earth is due to deliver annihilation.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    It is a disappointment coming from writer-director David Cronenberg, who has proved such a master at mind games. Cronenberg is perhaps too faithful to the book. The topic is provocative and certainly timely, but the film never achieves the incisive power of his best work, "A History of Violence" for one. Even an A-list ensemble that includes Juliette Binoche, Samantha Morton and Paul Giamatti can't save it.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    It is billed as a comedy, but it's really a lipstick-smeared drunken tragedy. The humor is so caustic you won't know whether to laugh or cry.
    • 37 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    It's a snooze.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    The film is only slightly more boorish than the racy cult hit was on telly and would probably not be worth the celluloid expended were it not for the bookish, brainy Will McKenzie (Simon Bird).
    • 47 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    There are some crowd-pleasers - but Hotel Transylvania never becomes the great monster mash that seemed in the offing.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    Romance and capers exist in Lay the Favorite, they just aren't played well.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    Some of the language is smart, sinister and ironic in just the right ways, particularly when Addison, Eric Bana's serial-killing mastermind, delivers it. In other cases, the dialogue is so ludicrously off - either unnecessary, or unnecessarily misogynistic if a cop is doing the talking - that it's hard to believe the same person wrote it.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    So thrill-less, so chill-less is Jack Reacher that it is unlikely to spark interest, much less controversy.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    The soul of the era is missing, and with it any reason to care. In Fleischer's hands, the high-stakes shootouts are as stylish as a GQ spread, but it's nearly impossible to figure out who's zoomin' who.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    Nothing clicks, nothing resonates, everything's broken.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    All the talking would be fine, but the dialogue is preachy, the drama too earnest and the action kind of sluggish, though it's hard not to get a jolt when Johnson jumps behind the wheel.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    The war crimes and romance stories theoretically run on parallel tracks, but the overall pacing is ragged and the dialogue frequently out of step with the characters we've met.
    • 41 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    It's massive, all the retaliation and the world saving stuff. And it's convoluted. Frankly no one should have to think that hard to keep up with the Joes.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    The promise it begins with doesn't pay off. And while Arthur Newman is not a complete disaster, it does leave you wishing the romance and the ride had been a whole lot smoother.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    The great failing of The Iceman is not in giving us a monster, but in not making us care.
    • 43 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    Violet & Daisy comes out of the gate guns blazing. Too bad it ends as a misfire.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    We're the Millers is full of moments that feel as forced as the marriage of convenience — and contrivance — in the movie.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 40 Betsy Sharkey
    Many of the transitions between narrative and music are rough. The temptations of the street, all too real in the real world, feel forced. Confrontations become clichés. The substance of human motivation is missing. And thus the heart never beats as it should.