For 346 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 59% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 38% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Bilge Ebiri's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 60
Highest review score: 100 James White
Lowest review score: 0 The Human Centipede III (Final Sequence)
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 45 out of 346
346 movie reviews
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Bilge Ebiri
    The LEGO Movie is the kind of animated free-for-all that comes around very rarely, if ever: A kids’ movie that matches shameless fun with razor-sharp wit, that offers up a spectacle of pure, freewheeling joy even as it tackles the thorniest of issues.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Bilge Ebiri
    Magical and melancholy, The Tale of Princess Kaguya comes from the other mad genius of Studio Ghibli, Isao Takahata, who co-founded the beloved Japanese animation company alongside the great Hayao Miyazaki back in 1985.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Bilge Ebiri
    One of the greatest documentaries I’ve ever seen.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 100 Bilge Ebiri
    Fun, touching, and expertly assembled.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 100 Bilge Ebiri
    Robert Gordon and Morgan Neville’s masterful Best of Enemies leaves you with an overwhelming sense of despair. It’s not just a great documentary, it’s a vital one.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 100 Bilge Ebiri
    Shaun the Sheep might look like an exciting, no-nonsense tale for little kids — and it totally is, on one level — but beneath its pitch-perfect simplicity lies great wisdom and beauty.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Bilge Ebiri
    James White looks like a simple film on its surface.... But despite the vérité-influenced stylization, writer-director Mond (whose own struggle with loss likely inspired some of this story) doesn’t seem too interested in realism or grit.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 100 Bilge Ebiri
    Welcome to Leith is a sober, terrifying look at the very real monsters roaming the quiet countryside.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Bilge Ebiri
    Of Men and War’s compassion is matched only by its relentlessness.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Bilge Ebiri
    Lonergan is the master of taking a scene that starts off as something familiar, then sending it spinning off in another direction, and then pulling back at just the right moment, as the viewer’s imagination hurtles ahead to fill in the gaps.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 100 Bilge Ebiri
    It confronts, but it doesn’t exploit. It’s about one of the most horrifying events of recent years, and yet it’s defined by its austerity, its sense of quiet. It is as much about the complex, dull horror of memory as it is about the brute, sharp horror of that day.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 90 Bilge Ebiri
    The Great Beauty is a subtly daring cinematic high-wire act — an entire film built around one character’s unrealized, unspecified yearning. And it might just be the most unforgettable film of the year.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 90 Bilge Ebiri
    The mystery may be resolved, but the suspense and uncertainty remain. And so, Guiraudie ends his film on a cold, almost cruel note of existential solitude that just might, if you let it, break your heart.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 90 Bilge Ebiri
    This amazing, maddening film presents a series of extended, mostly static, terrifying tableaux of despair, poverty, and decay.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Bilge Ebiri
    Beyond the Lights is a deft, gorgeous movie. For all its honesty, it’s never slow, and for all its criticism of the music industry, it’s never finger-wagging.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 90 Bilge Ebiri
    A truly strange, wondrous beast. It has the playful humor and charm of a children’s movie, but its design is dark and unsettling.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 90 Bilge Ebiri
    Wit and charm matter, and The DUFF has a good deal of both. The cast will be stars, the gags will be immortal, and you’ll still be watching this movie years from now.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 90 Bilge Ebiri
    With this cast, and such a vivid sense of play, Results manages, in its own subtle, unassuming way, to reinvent the rom-com. It’s enchanting.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Bilge Ebiri
    Jauja is a rapturously bizarre movie that resists knowledge. That’s its secret, intoxicating power; the less you understand, the more mesmerized you are.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 90 Bilge Ebiri
    This small, grim documentary about Indonesia is actually a bigger and grimmer movie about all of us — our capacity for both breathtaking evil and, occasionally, profound bravery.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Bilge Ebiri
    It’s that rarest of psychological thrillers: one that actually lives up to the words “psychological thriller.”
    • 76 Metascore
    • 90 Bilge Ebiri
    One of the very best American independent films you’ll see this year, John Magary’s The Mend, takes what could have easily been a mundane tale of brotherly dysfunction and turns it into something abstract and electrifying.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 90 Bilge Ebiri
    Far beyond the courage of its convictions, The Armor of Light also has the intelligence and grace to embrace its contradictions. It’s a beautiful, conflicted piece of work.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 90 Bilge Ebiri
    Mustang breathes new life into the old trope by reconnecting it with the elemental horror that drives it. These aren’t just body snatchers; they take your soul, too.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 90 Bilge Ebiri
    It truly is a movie about politics, and it’s among the more mesmerizing ones you’ll see — even if you know very little about Zimbabwe itself.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Bilge Ebiri
    The film remains grounded in the elemental, the practical, and the real. That’s not to say it isn't beautiful.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Bilge Ebiri
    Drolly funny and rigorously executed, Corneliu Porumboui’s The Treasure offers a fine example of the conceptual boldness that characterizes much of New Wave Romanian cinema.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 90 Bilge Ebiri
    It's a beautiful, reflective film even as it is also a brutal, visceral one.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 90 Bilge Ebiri
    Little Men has a melancholy edge, but it’s not really a depressing film. For all the despair onscreen, what remains afterwards are its luminous characterizations and big-hearted filmmaking.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Rush satisfies our lust for both grand character combat and deadly gearhead spectacle.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Frozen is one of the few recent films to capture that classic Disney spirit.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Tim’s Vermeer starts off in a playful fashion, but as he soldiers on, our intrepid, mild-mannered technologist finds himself getting emotional. In the presence of art, something happens. By the time it’s over, don’t be surprised if you’re more in awe of the work of an artist than ever before. Maybe this is Penn and Teller’s final, subtle rug-pulling moment: An attempt to demystify the artistic process ends up posing even greater mysteries.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    This smallest of films marks a welcome return to the world of interpersonal miniature for the writer-director.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Chow is at his best when juggling disparate elements – tragedy, slapstick, romance, melancholy, fantasy. Everything is big with him; he seems incapable of underplaying anything. The crazier his movies, the better. And Journey to the West might be the craziest thing he’s done yet. You may wonder, afterwards, if you dreamt it all.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Ernest and Celestine is a modest, beautiful little children’s fable with a wise, grown-up heart.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    They’re great stories, and it’s through them that Jodorowsky’s Dune shows us how the greatest movie never made, in its own crazy little way, somehow still came to be.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    It’s the closest I’ve seen a film come to an act of genuine hypnosis.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Belle does have a clear moral compass, but it refuses easy answers and withholds easy judgments. As such, it feels profoundly human.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Jodorowsky’s fondness for the surreal and grotesque is in full evidence here. What makes his films so captivating, however, isn’t their strangeness, but their refusal to divide the world into good and bad, even when it’s easy to do so.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Byrkit’s film is very much its own thing. It’s an urbane dinner-party movie that turns into something magnificent, terrible, and strange – and yet it never quite stops being an urbane dinner-party movie, never lets up its tone of ironic refinement. Coherence is a gentle film, but you walk away from it with your brain on fire.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    For all the limitations of its setting and palette, this is a gorgeous, visually exciting movie.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    It's also breathtaking to watch a throwaway studio sequel break its corporate chains before your very eyes and become something thrilling and dangerous and alive.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Tate Taylor’s film cares less about narrative clarity and more about portraying a life lived between the extremes of sin and grace, between the abject and the sublime. It’s lively, stylized, and genuinely surprising.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    In the end, What If belongs to Zoe Kazan. And both she and it are wonderful.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    As playful as it is, Lenny Abrahamson’s film is mostly a surprisingly earnest story about the compromises and conflicts of art, stardom, and mental illness.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Certainly for any fan of Cave’s, 20,000 Days on Earth makes for a creative, enthralling journey through the man’s world.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    With Jimi: All Is By My Side, writer-director John Ridley tries to do for the rock biopic what Jimi Hendrix did for rock 'n' roll itself in the 1960s — explode it, redefine it, and help it find its best self.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    It’s a potentially grisly setup, but the actual movie makes death look downright fun.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    The film is called Dear White People, but it might as well be called Dear Everybody. It’s hilarious, and just about everyone will wince with recognition at some point in the film.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    John Wick is a violent, violent, violent film, but its artful splatter is miles away from the brutality of "Taken" or the gleeful gore of "The Equalizer." It’s a beautiful coffee-table action movie.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    I’ve now seen Jean-Luc Godard’s latest film twice, and I think I might be one more viewing away from finally being able to say what the hell it’s about. That sounds like a condemnation, but a film you need to see again should be a film you want to see again, and the oblique beauty of Goodbye to Language, shot in 3-D, has a tractor-beam-like pull.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Gabe Polsky's ingenious, touching documentary Red Army looks at the other side of this myth, the seemingly faceless, allegedly robotic players who made up the Soviet team. There, Polsky finds a story even more epic and powerful than the Miracle on Ice.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    It’s wonderfully inventive filmmaking: Amirpour’s striking compositions borrow from the iconography of both the Western and the horror film — wide, evocative vistas are intercut with dark, tense city streets where shadowy figures follow one another.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Romantic comedies involving people moving on after divorce are a dime a dozen, but rarely are they as generous, sharply observed, and humane as Angus MacLachlan’s Goodbye to All That.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    As the spiritual subtext took over, I couldn’t help but feel that something essential had been lost. The state overwhelms the individual; so, too, by the end, does this beautiful, strange movie.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Paddington is decidedly, proudly unhip. It’s a lovely, endearing chocolate-box of a movie.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Dope isn’t perfect — it’s got a couple too many endings, and it loses the romantic subplot for a distressingly long time. But it moves with amazing energy, the dialogue and soundtrack and imagery a constant stream of pop-culture references, in-jokes, and digressions.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    [A] haunting, beautiful movie.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Gibney’s a bit like a kid in an exposé-candy store here, and you can sense him trying to cram as much as he can into the film. Good for him: Going Clear is jaw-dropping. You wouldn’t really want it any other way.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    '71
    Whenever the film focuses on Gary, it’s O’Connell’s show. And the actor’s ability to quietly express a whole range of emotions with his body language and his eyes, is staggering — especially since, for much of the film, he’s limping and covered in blood.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    It’s a fascinating meeting of three minds, and perspectives. Chief among them is Salgado himself.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    It’s great not just because we’re eavesdropping on two rock survivors, but also because we’re seeing, in these living legends, the handiwork of the two unsung men to whom this film pays tribute.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    It may not quite have the explosive charm of some of the classics, but Black Souls is an elegant, unsettling addition to the gangster-movie canon. Get on its unique wavelength, and you may find it transfixing.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    What makes it work is the solemn efficiency of director David Oelhoffen’s storytelling and the quiet intensity of the two leads.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Lafleur’s film is a quiet trifle that sneaks up on you, like a pleasant dream you might have and then gradually forget. Its very slightness is its greatest weapon.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Based on a novel by Marco Franzoso, Hungry Hearts is a riveting, relentless film. It may also be an infuriating one, and not always in a good way.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    The Tribe is a harrowing, corrosive film, but there’s great, urgent beauty in it.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    The patient storytelling and the elegant and colorful hand-drawn animation combine to give the film a pleasing, picture-book-like quality that should appeal to kids; there’s something very old-school about the film’s aesthetic. But in some senses, it also feels like a blast of fresh air, not the least because of where, and on whom, it chooses to place its focus.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Don’t let the politics scare you off, though, for Jimmy’s Hall is a joyous movie. I wasn’t being glib with that earlier mention of "Footloose": Loach’s film isn’t technically a musical, but it has that same spirit, that same let’s-put-on-a-show vitality.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Somehow, gradually, this intimate documentary portrait of one very unique person starts to take on the qualities of a national epic. Through the eyes of this man, we start to see our own country in a different light.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Sherlock Holmes is totally cool again, which warms my dorky heart.
    • 34 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Vacation is lazy, idiotic, and gross — and I laughed my ass off at it.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Lapid’s thrilling use of the camera, the way his unbalanced frame and his imaginative staging work with the precision of his story, results in something new and genuinely unnerving.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    The first thing to know about The Diary of a Teenage Girl is that young British actress Powley is staggeringly good in it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Cop Car does enough things so well for so long that to quibble with its finale feels churlish. This is a film very much worth seeing.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    We know these characters are going through a lot, even if we don’t always see it. And so, this short, ramshackle, shrinking movie manages to stick with you.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Don’t expect incendiary topicality from The Golden Dream; this is more poetry than politics.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    It’s a drama, and it smartly uses its little moments of humiliation to open our eyes to a world of delicate, but deep, injustice.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Queen of Earth is a psychodrama shot like a horror movie — "Persona" meets "The Shining." Right down to the haunting, minimalist score (by Keegan DeWitt) that’s perched dangerously, wonderfully between spooky and lyrical.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Coming Home works best on a more lived-in, emotional level. It presents a trajectory not uncommon in Zhang's films: a journey from howling passion to somber, almost tragic acceptance.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    A film that turns on this kind of ambiguity would ordinarily be cold, grim, paranoid. But Boden and Fleck give this world texture and warmth; their widescreen interiors glow, and it’s hard not to be lulled into them by the siren song of conversation and clinking drinks and possibility.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    It’s a tale of class privilege gone wrong, the relentless hunger for fame, stoic mourning and submerged family neuroses, and the crazy contortions caused by money and ownership. In 82 svelte minutes, Finders Keepers encapsulates something ineffable about the modern American experience.
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Taxi is a strange movie. These are nonprofessional actors, and the film veers between documentary realism and playful staginess.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    It doesn’t always seem to know what it wants to be. But it’s still full of marvels.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Bone Tomahawk is terrifying and strange, to be sure, but it’s the old-fashioned veneer that makes it beautiful.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Beneath the goofy plot, the tacky fashions, the fronting rappers, and the exploding bodies, there’s an undeniable earnestness to Tokyo Tribe. It’s the craziest film you’ll see this year, but it’s also — dear God, am I really saying this? — one of the sweetest.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    The Forbidden Room is often maddening, occasionally beautiful, and ultimately unforgettable.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    For all of (T)error’s topicality and its thriller-like qualities, what makes the film is Sutcliffe and Cabral’s compact, complex portrait of Saeed — paranoid, chatty, mired in self-loathing, but also oddly reflective.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Goodnight Mommy is a very disquieting, very suspenseful film, but proceed with caution.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    This understated, generous film quietly sneaks up on you.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    The earnest enthusiasm with which Operation Avalanche begins, and the paranoia and fear toward which it proceeds, chart the course of an entire nation.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    Sing Street is far more boisterous and certainly funnier than Once, but it remains in a minor key; “finding happiness in sadness,” is how one character puts it.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 80 Bilge Ebiri
    It’s occasionally beautiful, but just as often stomach-turning. You watch it at a remove, but still with a dull combination of pity and horror and regret. Maybe that’s the idea. For a brief, agonizing moment, you share the spiritual quicksand with these disgraced men.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 70 Bilge Ebiri
    Insidious: Chapter 2 may be somewhat uneven, but at a certain point near the end, I realized I hadn’t taken any notes during the second half. For all its weirdness, the film had utterly transported me. Bring on Chapter 3.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Bilge Ebiri
    Jayne Mansfield’s Car isn’t likely to set America’s theaters on fire, but it’s a powerful whisper of a film.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 70 Bilge Ebiri
    While it was often all over the place, it worked, because directors Phil Lord and Chris Miller ladled out the chaos with such charm.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 70 Bilge Ebiri
    Here are two action stars having fun; watching them work together as a team is a lot more entertaining than you might have expected. Try not to think too hard about it, and Escape Plan is stupid, stupid fun.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 70 Bilge Ebiri
    It shows us things — obscene and hilarious, yes, but also just as often harrowing and unforgettable — we never thought we’d see. It’s ridiculous, but it has a ragged nobility all its own.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 70 Bilge Ebiri
    For all the fecal matter flying around, and all the dick jokes, Bad Grandpa turns out to be an act of redemption: It’s the anti-Borat. And for all its flaws, it might just be the most heartwarming movie of the year.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 70 Bilge Ebiri
    It’s the kind of solid, small-scale, entertaining action flick we probably need more of these days.

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