For 249 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 57% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 41% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 5.2 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Bill Gallo's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 65
Highest review score: 100 Chicago
Lowest review score: 10 Drop Dead Gorgeous
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 29 out of 249
249 movie reviews
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Bill Gallo
    This unstinting look at growing up in the 1990s never pulls its punches. Bridging the angst of Generation X and the uncertainties of Generation Y, Chick reveals the romantic traumas, career screwups and self-absorbed fantasies of a group of eastern college grads.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Bill Gallo
    A thoroughly unremarkable police action movie starring the magnetic Samuel L. Jackson.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 60 Bill Gallo
    The problem here lies not in the abundance of blood--we've seen that before--but in the film's pounding insistence, which prevails for all two hours and 40 minutes, that we also absorb a rather thin and unreliable history lesson.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 60 Bill Gallo
    Some Marvel fans and die-hard devotees of Lou Ferrigno, the bodybuilder who played The Hulk on television (and who does a brief walk-on here), may find Ang Lee's whole enterprise grandiose and, given its not-always-successful attempt to fuse brains and brawn, a little bit silly.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 60 Bill Gallo
    This is a deeply disturbing (if not very satisfying) view of what happened at Columbine and in other school shootings.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Bill Gallo
    AKA
    Alternately fascinating and distracting.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 60 Bill Gallo
    There are many winning moments here, but director Nigel Cole (Saving Grace) sometimes imparts to the thing a terrible case of the cutes and an overeagerness to please.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 60 Bill Gallo
    Hamburg's smartypants banter is a bit spotty, but the bathroom humor, of all things, hits the mark, and Stiller's trademark wide-eyed bafflement wins the day again.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 60 Bill Gallo
    Homer would be hard-pressed to find any remaining shred of "The Iliad" in this over-the-top entertainment. It has a lot of loud passion but not much poetry, and that's appropriate for a movie that could well be subtitled My Big Fat Greek Bloodletting.
    • 38 Metascore
    • 60 Bill Gallo
    The film is amateurish in places, but fascinating: Bring your eager hypothalamus and your tuned-up frontal lobes with you. They'll get a workout.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Bill Gallo
    This resolutely old-fashioned movie is less a drama of the streets than a kind of recruiting film.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 60 Bill Gallo
    For now, it might be best to acknowledge this as an impressive debut and wait for the grown-up stuff to come.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 60 Bill Gallo
    Happily, the director and writer Andrea Gibb treat little Frankie with as much dramatic respect as the grown-up characters, and he saves the movie from killing sweetness.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 60 Bill Gallo
    The result is a kind of quirky, high-toned soap opera.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 60 Bill Gallo
    If the Navy is looking for splashy recruiting tools, it could do worse than Stealth, a zillion-dollar action movie stuffed with futuristic jet fighters, glamorous carrier pilots and an overload of explosive, mostly digital derring-do.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 60 Bill Gallo
    Little Ralph comes off like "Billy Elliot" on steroids. Still, this an energetic movie that can be truly hilarious in spots, and it captures perfectly the oppressive atmosphere of a Catholic boys' school in the ’50s.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Bill Gallo
    Instead of slick heroism, the saving grace of The Matador (which was obviously made on something less than a blockbuster budget) lies in the comic interplay between Brosnan's ignoble Mr. Noble and the hapless square he picks to serve his purposes.
    • 47 Metascore
    • 60 Bill Gallo
    Carrey's brand of exhausting physical comedy is a far cry from Segal's useful bewilderment, so this ride is both rougher and loonier.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 60 Bill Gallo
    Atkins has trouble keeping the tension high and the jokes rolling. Halfway through he begins tripping over the noir genre's dark rules, and in the end he veers off into a haze of romantic redemption that Billy Wilder and Nicholas Ray would have scoffed at.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 60 Bill Gallo
    Ali
    Muhammad Ali's spirit, his life force, is not quite present here, despite Smith's astonishing mimicry and Mann's considerable perspiration.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Bill Gallo
    Picture the dopes from "Dumb and Dumber" getting mixed up in organized crime -- but without benefit of Jim Carrey's rubberized pratfalls or his go-to-hell anarchism.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 60 Bill Gallo
    In the end, it demonstrates all over again the virtual impossibility of doing Nabokov justice on film, because his work is so resolutely and brilliantly made of words.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 60 Bill Gallo
    Not a film for everyone, but if you're in the mood for a little sensory overload, some spirited intellectual gymnastics and an introduction to the most intriguing new actress Europe has produced in years, get in line with the rest of the thrill-seekers.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 60 Bill Gallo
    A teen-anxiety movie that leaves no doubt where it stands on "family values" and moral absolutes: It approves. The shock troops of the Cinema Without Limits army are unlikely to buy many tickets, but those who do will probably see the thing as sanctimonious pabulum -- even for its target audience of adolescents.
    • New Times (L.A.)
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Gallo
    Carrey and the Farrellys are equal-opportunity offenders.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Gallo
    In the end, Stevie is a relentlessly messy, sometimes trying picture of family dysfunction, official neglect and personal tragedy, a disturbing redneck soap opera about real people and real consequences in which the protagonist--like the filmmaker--often proves to be as unlikable as he is sympathetic.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Gallo
    The cast has plenty of room to emote, but their task feels a bit empty and thankless. For the most part, they're carrying the director's water.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Gallo
    More well-meant than well-made, the movie is ethnically accurate (sometimes, you smother in the marinara), but its forced sensitivity can get abrasive, and the drama is full of false notes.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Gallo
    Competently if unremarkably directed by Englishwoman Clare Kilner, should prove compelling enough to Moore's huge legion of fans.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Gallo
    The flashy sensationalism of The Sixth Sense -- maybe the best thing about it -- is at war with its desire for contemplation.