For 92 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 58% higher than the average critic
  • 4% same as the average critic
  • 38% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 7 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Bill Stamets' Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 66
Highest review score: 100 Ida
Lowest review score: 12 The Room
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 69 out of 92
  2. Negative: 5 out of 92
92 movie reviews
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Bill Stamets
    [A] stunning “documentary of the imagination."
    • 89 Metascore
    • 100 Bill Stamets
    Ida
    Ida reaches spiritual depth through affecting performances rendered in sublime black-and-white compositions.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 90 Bill Stamets
    This is vicarious cinema at its best.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 88 Bill Stamets
    The first-rate Italian comedy Reality — which fakes Pope Benedict appearing in St. Peter’s Square — likens consecration to elevating an “everyman” to pop celebrity.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 88 Bill Stamets
    A sublime meditation on solitude.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Bill Stamets
    A Touch of Sin is humanist critique of the country’s turn to capitalism.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 88 Bill Stamets
    Like Father, Like Son is always wise about the quandary faced by the two fathers and the two mothers.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 88 Bill Stamets
    Despite our narrow angle on Nepal, Manakamana peers into lives at close range.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 80 Bill Stamets
    Catherine Keener is wonderfully weird as a vicious vice president of human relations, and Nicky Katt is brilliant as an actor playing Hitler in a stage play.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 80 Bill Stamets
    Screenwriter Kate Boutilier provides plenty of sharp patter, and Paul Simon contributed the catchy song "Father and Daughter."
    • 91 Metascore
    • 80 Bill Stamets
    Key action points are edited with finesse, but the denouement, with its dutiful hail of gunfire, is heartless and mechanical.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    Panic about pop culture is not new. Yet Antiviral finds a novel angle of attack.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    Morales trafficks in familiar formulas of an everyman in a bind with evil men. What sets Graceland apart are the conflicted values of its characters.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    Kim deals with an ancient suspicion of money that predates Marx, MasterCard and Madoff.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    Spectacle matters more than story for Reygadas, who wants to create a world onscreen instead of developing characters or critiquing society.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    [This] timely documentary is less persuasive about translating logic into political and economic reality.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    In his press notes, Winterbottom adds: “We didn’t make the moral too obvious, or too heavy-handed.” And they don’t. But the bottom line is unmistakable.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    Dispiriting as Blackfish is at times, it offers beautiful advocacy for orca freedom. Anecdotes and data indicate these mammals are highly sensitive and social. Treating them as we do for our entertainment and profit is unconscionable.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    The Attack is not just about an incident targeting Israelis. This is also the story of not knowing Palestinians.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    Hannah Arendt takes seriously the life of the mind.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    You’re Next benefits from skilled script-keepers.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    The elegant style of the fighting sequences does more than display camera and kung fu technique — this style also shows fighters living with honor.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    The true strength of Spurlock’s documentary is how he showcases the behind-the-scenes, off-stage personalities of the One Direction boys.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    [An] informing if not inflaming documentary.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    A family implodes with a biting commentary on patriarchy.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    The ethical considerations of these physicians and their patients is the focus, not the pro-lifers and their death threats.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    This saga of romance works with an unromantic style.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    Set in England, the dystopic “Brazil” and “28 Days Later” both ended with pastoral idylls for adult couples. How I Live Now offers adolescents a lovely vision of holistic healing in the same countryside.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    Bastards is both visceral and visual.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    A diverting tutorial with this takeaway: “Let’s be puzzled about what seems obvious.”
    • 59 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    This buddy/road film builds tension with its missing person quest in a border-crossing underworld.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    Following the Ninth: In the Footsteps of Beethoven’s Final Symphony is one more bravo for the iconic masterpiece.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    Dhoom:3 entertains as a spectacle of chases, bank capers, magic acts and song-and-dance numbers.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    Slocombe may not carve up his kin for Cold Turkey, but he serves a wry repast.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    At Berkeley earns credit for documenting a distinctly articulate community.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    The Past is an understated study of two marriages in transition.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    Director Philipp Kadelbach crafts a war drama cued to the ethics of the characters.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    We get a parable of individualism and its perils for a turn-of-the-20th century woman, one proclaimed by a critic of her time “a revolt against nature: a woman genius.”
    • 78 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    Murmelstein answers his accusers in The Last of the Unjust. Over a compelling three hours and 38 minutes.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    The Missing Picture is a wrenching yet tender memoir by Rithy Panh about life and death in the time of Pol Pot.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    This late adulthood lark is a treat.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    [A] diverting documentary.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    Joe
    Gripping and at times agonizing.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    Jim Jarmusch stocks his latest low-key indie with more than his usual characters in low-velocity drift. The Akron-born auteur infuses the title couple of Only Lovers Left Alive with his taste for culture, if not cuisine.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    Focusing on Rumsfeld’s 2001-06 stint at the Pentagon, Morris scrutinizes his rhetoric and rationale for attacking Iraq and Afghanistan. Tactics and costs take a back seat to semantics.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    Lovingly detailed with animated and archival imagery, For No Good Reason shares the fine-grain layered style of its subject.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    Snappy graphics channel the info flow like a sugar rush. Scary music cues are overused. Narrator Katie Couric wisely stays offscreen. That keeps Fed Up from feeling like an Oprah special.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    Supermensch sells the impression that its subject is a genuinely good guy.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    Instead of venturing outside Outpost Restrepo, we hear what the soldiers feel about their 15-month deployment.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    A disquieting film about testing faith.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    In the introspective The Last Sentence Swedish director Jan Troell invokes ’50’s and ’60’s Swedish cinema: masterly black-and-white cinematography, philosophical angst, a lifeless marriage and loved ones visiting from the afterlife.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Stamets
    This understated documentary, though, has no agenda to shame any one family or agency.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 70 Bill Stamets
    Greene delivers a wrenching performance, and like "Smoke Signals," the film ends with a cathartic, triumphant flourish.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 70 Bill Stamets
    For the most part this is a scenic and well-scored Holocaust survival tale.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 70 Bill Stamets
    As a director, Singleton shares with Furious a didactic streak. Singleton is no demagogue, but his fast-action style tends to erase the nuances of interracial dynamics.
    • 44 Metascore
    • 70 Bill Stamets
    But Girl 6 isn't what we'd expect from Spike Lee: after exhorting his fans to wake up in his early efforts, he now tempts them to hang up.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 70 Bill Stamets
    Director Tarsem (The Cell) reworks the 1981 Bulgarian film "Yo Ho Ho" for this stylish fantasy.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Stamets
    Kleine could have used Gregory’s lifelong trajectory to tell a larger story of the international avant-garde theater scene. Instead there is overmuch fuss about his coterie of dear companions.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Stamets
    Chilean writer-director Sebastian Silva re-creates a youthful road trip with a head trip at the end in Crystal Fairy & the Magical Cactus, more character sketch than psychedelic sojourn.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Stamets
    A naturalist comic of inarticulate manners, writer-director Andrew Bujalski attempts the ensemble styles of Robert Altman and Christopher Guest to peer into a micro-culture in Computer Chess.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Stamets
    Stylistically, this saga of survival never aims for urban neo-realism. Yet, as sentimental humanism, it shows laudable taste in dodging the usual indulgent touches and turns when lost kids find their way.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Stamets
    Observant with mannered edits, Jem Cohen’s modest story delivers a character sketch and a traveler’s essay.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Stamets
    Tornatore’s ideas about art, trust and intimacy are curious, even if they do not quite click.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Stamets
    May errs in styling this human interest saga.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Stamets
    Non-narrative films can be opaque in deep ways. Visitors slips into pseudo-profundity. That said, I’d see it again.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Stamets
    Filmmaker Todd Douglas Miller unfortunately adopts the format of prime-time docu-tainment.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Stamets
    Puenzo’s initial premise is more promising, though, than her sensational tone.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Stamets
    Writer-director Hiroyuki Okiura, however, does not match the high expectations for story and design set by other Japanese animators.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Stamets
    Level Five (1996) is a poetic if occasionally opaque film essay on the 1945 Battle of Okinawa.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 60 Bill Stamets
    The heaving computer-generated sea swells doesn't match the conventionally animated characters. The action scenes are too antic, but directors Tim Johnson and Patrick Gilmore serve up a sweet romantic subplot.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 60 Bill Stamets
    Unfortunately, Volcano is also faithful to Hollywood's legendary lack of originality.
    • 39 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Stamets
    Director Kasper Barfoed defaults to intense replays of surveillance audio recordings, frantic strokes on computer keyboards, and standard-issue chases.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Stamets
    The film indulges in sentimental and sensational tropes. The manipulative touches do more than dis­­­­­­tract, they irk. This story could have been retold without resorting to all the unfortunate formulas used in prime-time and cable fare.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Stamets
    An obliquely clinical love story.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Stamets
    Muslim comics are correct about not needing to defend their faith in post-9/11 America. Their patriotism is not the point. I just wish they told better jokes.
    • 48 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Stamets
    Lost for Words is directed with little originality by Stanley J. Orzel.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Stamets
    Shapiro fails to sell Shavitz as the “wise and wry, ornery and opinionated” figure the press notes promise. No opinion, wise or otherwise, is uttered by this rustic quasi-eccentric, let alone a green ethos.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Stamets
    Director Scott Derrickson and his co-writer, Paul Harris Boardman, deliver a routine procedural with unremarkable frights.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Stamets
    Hoogendijk is a guest with more tact than curiosity about why a three-year plan went so over schedule.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Stamets
    The Identical evangelizes and entertains with sincere mediocrity. If the style is unremarkably mainstream, the message is theologically murky.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Stamets
    Hicks may devote too much time on hospital errands and bedside moments as Terry’s health declines. But he succeeds at honoring the career of one man who is helping another’s.
    • 36 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Stamets
    In 20 Dates Myles Berkowitz strings together one embarrassing moment after another and triumphs in a culture characterized by actorly artifice.
    • 27 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Stamets
    A sunny, gentle action yarn with numbingly repetitive chase scenes and bouncy interludes of playtime.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 50 Bill Stamets
    Maxwell continues his textbook emphasis on military maneuvers, but despite literally thousands of Civil War reenactors recruited for the film, the wide-screen canvas fails to map the tactics or evoke the terror of battle.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 40 Bill Stamets
    A fair amount of visual panache, but the fight scenes are routine, the humor juvenile, and the Toronto locales rendered drab through muddy cinematography.
    • 16 Metascore
    • 40 Bill Stamets
    Likable but negligible.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 40 Bill Stamets
    Among the movie's many flaws are lackluster cinematography and leaden sound design. The Lost World also includes irritating little missteps in the plot.
    • 35 Metascore
    • 38 Bill Stamets
    Grudge Match does not work on any level. The story is unconvincing. The comedy elements are weak... And, worst of all, the acting in most scenes — particularly those involving Sylvester Stallone and Kim Basinger — is atrocious.
    • 31 Metascore
    • 20 Bill Stamets
    The plot is astoundingly senseless.
    • 30 Metascore
    • 20 Bill Stamets
    Inept script delivers a series of juvenile gags.
    • 25 Metascore
    • 20 Bill Stamets
    Director Bruce McCulloch, an alumnus of the Canadian TV show "The Kids in the Hall," lacks the sense of scale and timing needed for a feature film, and Lee's voice-over about fate that brackets the narrative only highlights its shapelessness.