For 64 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 26% higher than the average critic
  • 1% same as the average critic
  • 73% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.4 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Bill Weber's Scores

  • Movies
Average review score: 56
Highest review score: 100 Le Rayon Vert (1986)
Lowest review score: 25 Salmon Fishing in the Yemen
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 34 out of 64
  2. Negative: 18 out of 64
64 movie reviews
    • 74 Metascore
    • 88 Bill Weber
    Underlying the occasionally harrowing, consistently mournful tone is a philosophy that, more than being explicitly anti-capital punishment, puts both family ties and the social contract at the center of people's self-worth.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    The beloved gang's sweet reunion will melt nostalgic adults into laughter and tears, and maybe kids won't mind drippy new Muppet Walter so much.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    Fast on its feet, using 3D and motion-capture animation to kick its comedy-adventure into a superhuman gear, Steven Spielberg's The Adventures of Tintin is a wittily kineticized adaptation of the internationally loved comic books.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    Its director's romantic sensibilities wed to Terrence Rattigan's 60-year-old play, this period drama is buoyed by Rachel Weisz's poignant embodiment of a bourgeois wife seeking erotic autonomy.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    Confronting the concept of alienness in a California desert town, this modest tapestry finds equivalent dignity in history-conscious travelers and natives weighed down by roots or inertia.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    It's not easy to give a character study concerning mental illness the aspect of a psychological thriller without some notes of exploitation or trivialization creeping in, and Take Shelter makes a few missteps.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    Simply and devastatingly letting five residents of San Francisco share their reminiscences of that city's nightmarish "war zone" in the early, horrific years of AIDS, We Were Here creates a harrowing, streamlined oral history.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    This bio-documentary of a New Left godfather presents a formidable character simpatico with today's zeitgeist in his championing of "spontaneous uprising."
    • 51 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    Lionizing a world-class architect without tipping into hagiography, this documentary performs a graceful cinematic dance around his works.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    Goss's film carries its unique forms of narrative suspense, but her 16mm images imbue both the forbidding landscape and her characters' scientific aerie, though the observatory only dates from 1932, with a poetry of the seemingly eternal.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    A righteously outraged documentary targeting the "warm and fuzzy" iconography of the breast cancer fundraising bureaucracy and its camouflage of corporate priorities.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    A direct-cinema document of the Cairo protests that toppled Mubarak, Stefano Savona's film doesn't pretend that Egypt's resolution has yet won a lasting victory.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    The layered, character-driven drama may subvert expectations of a sunny Venetian noir, but observes its five principal characters with a probing, egalitarian eye.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    It chronicles the quest of a self-described "geek," and there are pleasurable frissons of discovery in the detective work.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Bill Weber
    Godfrey Reggio's symphony of pristine 4K images doesn't add up to one grand epiphany, but an intermittent cluster of small ones.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    A historical melodrama that retains an ancient, elemental pull even as it insufficiently charts motivation and the self-denying values of antiquity.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    Terri, a generously spirited dramedy in the high-school-misfit genre (indie division), finds director Azazel Jacobs taking a calling-card approach to his second feature.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    Handsomely mounted and shot with an eye for nocturnal Parisian mystery by Guillaume Schiffman, Gainsbourg somewhat mercifully peters out after the grande scandale of the provocateur's reggae version of "La Marseillaise," which earned him the wrath of French patriots.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    An understated--and at times, clinical to a fault--Oedipal drama of long-simmering resentment and familial love's ambiguities, I'm Glad My Mother Is Alive risks bringing chilly subjectivity to sensational raw material.
    • 50 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    With six protagonists serving as a cross-section of Tehran's youthful population, director Hossein Keshavarz's Dog Sweat is a somber, minor-keyed debut feature about the daily manifestations of oppression in contemporary Iran.
    • 54 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    A freeform, New York-based variation on the Arabian Nights tales by Jonas Mekas is both a pan-narrative and a disarming portrait of its sweetly curious maker.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    Gambling on the unlikely redemption of a doom metal fuck-up, this potential rock-doc tragedy reveals a bromance of idol and idolator.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    A night of reckoning by a hoodlum in his haunted former home is a more sober and remote Freudian farrago than one expects from Guy Maddin.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    Re-employing the tools of Jacques Tati and Jerry Lewis, this pleasant fable reclaims artful slapstick with a bliss that's hard to deny.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    This documentary on the many forms of human debt, though often frustratingly broad, offers a path to balancing civilization's ledger with a hard-nosed brand of altruism.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    Ultimately comes off as curiously anecdotal, lacking the dramatic dynamism that could give Marcel Pagnol's tale new life.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    A serviceable primer on the digital-celluloid divide in commercial cinema, if a bit unwieldy in scope and in danger of being made obsolete by the next version of the RED camera.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    While crediting free-form radio pioneer Bob Fass with changing the culture of broadcasting, this documentary remains clear-eyed about the decline of community radio and the New Left.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    This chronicle of two athletes throwing baseball's funkiest, least respected pitch is given depth by their stranger-than-fiction underdog status and camaraderie with mentors who've had the same struggles.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 63 Bill Weber
    Though its ballast of jokes and spectacle are formidable, it often lurches about at a remote, enigmatic distance