For 176 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 1.9 points higher than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Bill White's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 61
Highest review score: 100 Killer of Sheep
Lowest review score: 0 Keeping Up with the Steins
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 98 out of 176
  2. Negative: 21 out of 176
176 movie reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Bill White
    An allegory of our times, Shotgun Stories is a tragedy of biblical scale and an intimate family drama. Unlike the more lauded films of last year, which glorified a national preoccupation with bloody deeds, Shotgun Stories is a passionate cry to end the violence and a reminder that we, as free individuals, have the power to determine our own destinies.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Bill White
    Ripe with characters and events reflecting the psychic travails of today's young adults.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Bill White
    Another worthy performance comes from Valeria Bruni-Tedeschi.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Bill White
    A heartbreaking look at broken trust.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Bill White
    A miracle of a movie that is both fairy tale and slice of life.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Bill White
    Free of the ghetto clich├ęs that fill the movies made by people who have never lived in one, Killer of Sheep is a strongly individual portrait of black, working-class America.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Bill White
    While the significance of the imagery, including the slow disintegration of an immense piece of sculpted petroleum, is elusive, the strangeness of Barney's visual sense never fails to stimulate the senses.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Bill White
    Actors Laia Marull and Luis Tosar explore the intricate details of a relationship based on the laws of attraction and repulsion, in which the intellect is repeatedly devastated by primal passion.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Bill White
    Everlasting Moments both is a tribute to Larsson -- a relative of the director's wife, Jan (author of the original story) -- and a love letter to the art of photography.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 91 Bill White
    Most political films involving children are vicious or sentimental. The Year My Parents Went on Vacation, set in 1970 when Brazil was under the military dictatorship of General Emilio Medici, is neither.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 83 Bill White
    Even without the oral history, this trippy exploration of Cobain's earthy habitations would be worth seeing as a "Koyaanisqatsi" for the Puget Sound area.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Bill White
    Captures both the spirituality and humanity of monastic life.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 83 Bill White
    Speaks in the raw mumble of the dirty South. A regional film in the truest sense, it does for Memphis what its producer, John Singleton, once did for South Central Los Angeles.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Bill White
    A top-flight example of cinematic storytelling, thanks in large part to the unusual narration, spoken in English by David Gulpilil.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Bill White
    A lesson in listening.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 83 Bill White
    Meirelles adds another perspective, that the epidemic might be a good thing if, by being thrown into the darkness together, we may once again recognize the human family to which we all belong.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Bill White
    Genuinely funny and sweet, the film's "everybody wins" philosophy resonates beyond the feel-good surfaces.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 83 Bill White
    Margaret Brown's honest and non-judgmental film captures the artist's high and low points, from early appearances on regional television shows such as "Nashville Now" to the drunken and disorderly performances that defined his later years.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 83 Bill White
    And who would have guessed that, in this age of excess and one-upmanship, when bigger is always better, the year's most romantic screen kiss would last a mere two seconds.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Bill White
    The dark, rotting interiors and sunless winter skies create a festering atmosphere of unexpiated guilt as Kremer ponders the question of how a decent man is to navigate the rivers of hell.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Bill White
    There is more comedy than outrage in this critique of sexual inequality in Iran.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Bill White
    Machuca is a quiet film, moving sadly toward its inevitable climax, the final scenes a lesson in the methods by which the military restores order to a divided country.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 83 Bill White
    Captures the open-air rock festival experience more completely than any previous film of its kind.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Katharina Otto-Bernstein's oral history of Wilson's life and work, narrated by Wilson, with a handful of sycophants joining in on the choruses, is monstrously one-sided. It does, however, offer insights into the director's methods and motivations.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    With more sympathy for Johnston's suffering and less reveling in the fruits of his madness, The Devil and Daniel Johnston could have been a great film instead of a disturbing one.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Director Brown has made a career of chronicling the history of American folk music, and Pete Seeger: The Power of Song is a worthy companion piece to his 1982 debut, "The Weavers: Wasn't That a Time?"
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Takes a humorously gentle approach to the culture clash between the primitive and the modern. With wonderfully natural performances by the children, this is a family movie that crosses cultural boundaries in a celebration of the magical possibilities inherent in everyday objects.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Westfeldt's screenplay and Cary's direction combine to make it the best Manhattan love story since "When Harry Met Sally."
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Life on the freeway is hell, but what comes next for these workers might be worse.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Zhang is a master of detail and spectacle. There is also plenty of comedy, particularly in the scenes with linguistically challenged translators.

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