For 176 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 50% higher than the average critic
  • 3% same as the average critic
  • 47% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 0.5 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Bill White's Scores

  • Movies
  • TV
Average review score: 62
Highest review score: 100 Shotgun Stories
Lowest review score: 0 Keeping Up with the Steins
Score distribution:
  1. Positive: 98 out of 176
  2. Negative: 21 out of 176
176 movie reviews
    • 76 Metascore
    • 100 Bill White
    An allegory of our times, Shotgun Stories is a tragedy of biblical scale and an intimate family drama. Unlike the more lauded films of last year, which glorified a national preoccupation with bloody deeds, Shotgun Stories is a passionate cry to end the violence and a reminder that we, as free individuals, have the power to determine our own destinies.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 100 Bill White
    Ripe with characters and events reflecting the psychic travails of today's young adults.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 100 Bill White
    Another worthy performance comes from Valeria Bruni-Tedeschi.
    • 86 Metascore
    • 100 Bill White
    A heartbreaking look at broken trust.
    • 88 Metascore
    • 100 Bill White
    A miracle of a movie that is both fairy tale and slice of life.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 100 Bill White
    Free of the ghetto clichés that fill the movies made by people who have never lived in one, Killer of Sheep is a strongly individual portrait of black, working-class America.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 100 Bill White
    While the significance of the imagery, including the slow disintegration of an immense piece of sculpted petroleum, is elusive, the strangeness of Barney's visual sense never fails to stimulate the senses.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 100 Bill White
    Actors Laia Marull and Luis Tosar explore the intricate details of a relationship based on the laws of attraction and repulsion, in which the intellect is repeatedly devastated by primal passion.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 91 Bill White
    Everlasting Moments both is a tribute to Larsson -- a relative of the director's wife, Jan (author of the original story) -- and a love letter to the art of photography.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 91 Bill White
    Most political films involving children are vicious or sentimental. The Year My Parents Went on Vacation, set in 1970 when Brazil was under the military dictatorship of General Emilio Medici, is neither.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 83 Bill White
    Even without the oral history, this trippy exploration of Cobain's earthy habitations would be worth seeing as a "Koyaanisqatsi" for the Puget Sound area.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 83 Bill White
    Captures both the spirituality and humanity of monastic life.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 83 Bill White
    Speaks in the raw mumble of the dirty South. A regional film in the truest sense, it does for Memphis what its producer, John Singleton, once did for South Central Los Angeles.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 83 Bill White
    A top-flight example of cinematic storytelling, thanks in large part to the unusual narration, spoken in English by David Gulpilil.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 83 Bill White
    A lesson in listening.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 83 Bill White
    Meirelles adds another perspective, that the epidemic might be a good thing if, by being thrown into the darkness together, we may once again recognize the human family to which we all belong.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Bill White
    Genuinely funny and sweet, the film's "everybody wins" philosophy resonates beyond the feel-good surfaces.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 83 Bill White
    Margaret Brown's honest and non-judgmental film captures the artist's high and low points, from early appearances on regional television shows such as "Nashville Now" to the drunken and disorderly performances that defined his later years.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 83 Bill White
    And who would have guessed that, in this age of excess and one-upmanship, when bigger is always better, the year's most romantic screen kiss would last a mere two seconds.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 83 Bill White
    The dark, rotting interiors and sunless winter skies create a festering atmosphere of unexpiated guilt as Kremer ponders the question of how a decent man is to navigate the rivers of hell.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 83 Bill White
    There is more comedy than outrage in this critique of sexual inequality in Iran.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 83 Bill White
    Machuca is a quiet film, moving sadly toward its inevitable climax, the final scenes a lesson in the methods by which the military restores order to a divided country.
    • 60 Metascore
    • 83 Bill White
    Captures the open-air rock festival experience more completely than any previous film of its kind.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Katharina Otto-Bernstein's oral history of Wilson's life and work, narrated by Wilson, with a handful of sycophants joining in on the choruses, is monstrously one-sided. It does, however, offer insights into the director's methods and motivations.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    With more sympathy for Johnston's suffering and less reveling in the fruits of his madness, The Devil and Daniel Johnston could have been a great film instead of a disturbing one.
    • 81 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Director Brown has made a career of chronicling the history of American folk music, and Pete Seeger: The Power of Song is a worthy companion piece to his 1982 debut, "The Weavers: Wasn't That a Time?"
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Takes a humorously gentle approach to the culture clash between the primitive and the modern. With wonderfully natural performances by the children, this is a family movie that crosses cultural boundaries in a celebration of the magical possibilities inherent in everyday objects.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Westfeldt's screenplay and Cary's direction combine to make it the best Manhattan love story since "When Harry Met Sally."
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Life on the freeway is hell, but what comes next for these workers might be worse.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Zhang is a master of detail and spectacle. There is also plenty of comedy, particularly in the scenes with linguistically challenged translators.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Panayotopoulou casts a transcendent eye upon her downbeat subject matter, never dodging the unsentimental truth that growing up is about learning to live with the loss of those things we have loved.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    The Groomsmen, while as corny as a Staten Island marriage proposal, rings true on many levels.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    John Sayles ventures into August Wilson territory with Honeydripper.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    The film is imaginative but ugly, with bodily functions an unending source for grotesque and revolting imagery.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Offers compelling footage, but its revisionism can be distracting.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Unlike the worthless torture porn that is destroying the genre, Stuck is a horror movie with a reason for being.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    In a genre that has been battered by the cheap grotesqueries of special effects, it is a pleasure to be unsettled by something as simple as an invasive beam of light in the shadows of a haunted house.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Most disappointing is the ending, which, in projecting the possibility of a saner and more hopeful world, is a bit of a cop-out.
    • 52 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Not simply a coming-out story but a journey into the conflicted androgyny of early adolescence.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Fukada captures the stubborn individualism of a girl who embraces an unpopular lifestyle.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Although set in England with a predominantly British cast, Death at a Funeral is no stiff-upper-lipped comedy, but a lean, mean, and often crude, farce.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    The movie is funny without disrespecting its characters. But there is a sadness at its heart, because, although the possibilities for romantic happiness diminish after the age of 65, the dynamics of sexual attraction and coupling never change.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Despite the cultural and artistic differences among the contributors, the overall production design maintains a unified tone, helped in part by Laurent Perez's eerie soundtrack.
    • 45 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    A hilariously spry effort from an equally unpromising premise.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Filmmaker Pray, who is building an impressive body of documentaries on American subcultures, including the Seattle grunge scene in "Hype," graffiti artists in "Infamy" and truckers in "Big Rig," does an admirable job of allowing his subjects to represent themselves.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Movies about gurus generally fail to capture the charisma of their subjects. French director Jan Kounen's documentary on Amma, India's hugging saint, who allegedly has given restorative embraces to more than 45 million supplicants, is no exception.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Were it not for its pat resolutions, Mister Foe might deserve a mention alongside such classic psycho-sexual thrillers as "Vertigo" and "Peeping Tom." Instead, Mackenzie has reined in the strangeness to deliver a conventional, if better than average, mystery.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    The film doesn't shy away from the political side of hip-hop.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    The stories of the other competitors are just as fascinating, particularly that of Bernard Moitessier who, after nearly a year at sea, could not bear to return to England, and turned sail for Tahiti.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Throughout the film, music is used to define character and place. Two metal bands, Moral Decay and South Central Riot Squad, dominate the soundtrack whenever the gang is on the move.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Yu has a good time making fun of white people, in particular a pair of rival ping-pong teachers who seem inspired by the gay villains in the Bond film "Diamonds Are Forever."
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    This unusual journey behind prison bars is not only a plea for the rehabilitation of incarcerated criminals, but a testament to the redemptive powers of art.
    • 79 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Stanley Nelson's documentary shows how a religion becomes a cult, and how people are deceived by an ideal.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Where other documentarians look for a charismatic personality to enliven their films, Berlin and Fab focus on the community as a whole.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Suffers from a simplistic reductionism that suggests buying from local organic farmers might help avert the possibility of a worldwide famine triggered by Monsanto's suicide gene. It is a noble and quaint solution to a situation that won't be easily swayed by consumer votes.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    The embittered men make fascinating subjects.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    A deviously delightful entertainment.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Yes
    From the floating particles of dirt that open the film to the final image of a man and woman on a beach, Yes insists that we live with our mistakes since there is no escaping them.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    The pleasure of watching such well-crafted entertainment offsets the small disappointments.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Peled's film, much of it shot clandestinely with smuggled cameras, is commendable in its fair depiction of the problems faced by the textile industry.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    This is a film about brave women who left home as teenagers and have been on their own ever since. Now, nearing the end of that road, they face their inevitable decline with a cheerful vivacity.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    In its best moments, The Cats of Mirikitani captures both the tragedy and transcendence of his life, from the Sacramento-born, Hiroshima-raised youth who returned to the States in 1937 rather than join the Japanese Imperial Army, to the proudly self-sufficient man who struggled through New York's fierce winters until gaining recognition both as an artist and a human being.
    • 73 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    With adventurous forays into questionable neighborhoods and stimulating tours through street markets, "Crossing the Bridge" is about the city as much as its music.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Driving Lessons was written by director Jeremy Brock as a vehicle for Grint and Walters, who appeared together in the Harry Potter movies. They make a terrific screen couple. Walters is alternately zany and poignant, with Grint the perfect foil, a bemused, confused innocent who only wants to do good.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Hardcore remains, in the words of Minor Threat's Ian MacKaye, the voice of "kids who refuse to be slotted into generic kids roles," so fans of current groups such as Disturbed may feel shortchanged by allegations that it was all over by 1986.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    The rude naturalism of the opening scenes between Wilson and Jacob recalls the spirited vulgarity of "Clerks," with dialogue that would be hopelessly offensive were it not so funny and true to life.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Cusack, who is beginning to look disturbingly like Dustin Hoffman, is not only the film's center, but its orbit as well.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Journeys into a new heart of darkness, the destination of which lies outside the frontiers of humanity.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Although this is director Mark Obenhaus' first ski movie, it is every bit as exciting as the popular Warren Miller pictures, and boasts an unobstrusive soundtrack in place of the heavy metal racket that fuels most sports documentaries.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Stunningly beautiful film.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    A thrilling and scary ride.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Not since Spike Lee's "Bamboozled" has such an irreverent carnival of African American stereotypes been so irreverently sent up.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    An inspirational portrait of an unwanted kid who brought culture to a world that had known only violence.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Once the story moves up north to Indianapolis, things become pat and predictable. But for its first 80 minutes, Great World of Sound hits all the right notes.
    • 82 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Most films about illegal immigration are set on the Mexican border, and Frozen River is free of the stereotypical characters and situations of that familiar setting. It also offers a rare look at modern Native American life, exploring the ambiguity of what it means to say that the laws of the white man cannot be enforced on Indian territory.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Garbarski recovers from the melodrama with a final image that is so sweet, so simple and so understated that one is tempted to say it is perfect.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    A special film, one that refuses to package a person's life into a comfortably familiar genre.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    What is ultimately so special about this film is its handling of the relationship between Lennon and wife, Yoko Ono.
    • 63 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Cunha and Silva, both featured in 2002's similarly themed "City of God," have been playing these roles since they were 13, and the rapport between them is electrifying. Much of the sweetness of the film comes from what they bring to their roles.
    • 56 Metascore
    • 75 Bill White
    Contrary to its title, Virtual JFK is less a counter-history of the Vietnam years than a tribute to John F. Kennedy's stubborn resistance to a military that pressured him to go to war on six occasions during his short presidency.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Bill White
    Control is director Anton Corbijin's first feature, and he too frequently makes the mistake of falling back on his rock video skills.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 67 Bill White
    It is ironic that the core audience for Chop Shop is that very crowd that has recently taken steps to redevelop the Iron Triangle into something more Manhattan-friendly.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 67 Bill White
    The film comes to life when Cohen is on screen.
    • 53 Metascore
    • 67 Bill White
    An eye-opener for those unfamiliar with the tribulations many immigrants endure on their road to American citizenship. And yes, it is also a fairy tale, but not all fairy tales are for children.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 67 Bill White
    Deepened by the socioeconomic undercurrent that suggests the lengths to which workers are forced to prostitute themselves to survive corporate downsizing.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 67 Bill White
    Although the film is entertaining, its cleverness is not enough to cover its shortcomings.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 67 Bill White
    A slight but wise comedy about the loneliness that makes all men brothers.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 67 Bill White
    It works as a wistful coda to suggest that the song will go on long after the show is over.
    • 49 Metascore
    • 67 Bill White
    The cast is perfect, but the script is like a low ceiling, keeping a lid on what should have been a confluence of riotous misadventures.
    • tbd Metascore
    • 67 Bill White
    The life of a prison guard is dull, no matter who is in the cell. Director Bille August makes what he can of this material, always holding our interest but never fulfilling the promise of a close encounter with one of the 20th century's most controversial leaders.
    • 55 Metascore
    • 67 Bill White
    If the Polish brothers haven't quite mastered the mechanics of mainstream filmmaking, they have succeeded in bringing an independent spirit to the studio film.
    • 59 Metascore
    • 67 Bill White
    The meshing of Moliere and Tartuffe into one character creates so many complications and loose ends that it is a fool's errand to try to make sense of the story.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 67 Bill White
    A cross between David Bowie and Maria Callas, the German singer took androgyny to an unearthly level.
    • 78 Metascore
    • 67 Bill White
    Ripe with offbeat Americana, Beesley's rockumentary is also a portrait of growing up in a white-trash Okie ghetto.
    • 40 Metascore
    • 67 Bill White
    A wide-ranging, disturbing look at our obsession with our looks.
    • 72 Metascore
    • 67 Bill White
    A moving and touching documentary.
    • 57 Metascore
    • 67 Bill White
    Director Mitchell Lichtenstein finds new ground in the over-tilled suburbia of David Lynch and John Waters.
    • 65 Metascore
    • 67 Bill White
    While a fascinating subject, Bruce is a bit of a poseur, keenly aware of how he comes across on camera.
    • 61 Metascore
    • 58 Bill White
    Despite the scenic appeal of Mexico's Baja Peninsula, the film may prove too nerve-racking for casual viewers. It is a racing movie for the inside track.
    • 64 Metascore
    • 58 Bill White
    The Beautiful Country has an epic bearing, but a trite and troubled script makes it more a visual tirade than an engaging odyssey.

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