Brian Tallerico

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For 352 reviews, this critic has graded:
  • 46% higher than the average critic
  • 2% same as the average critic
  • 52% lower than the average critic
On average, this critic grades 3.1 points lower than other critics. (0-100 point scale)

Brian Tallerico's Scores

Average review score: 64
Highest review score: 100 Veep: Season 4
Lowest review score: 0 Stalker: Season 1
Score distribution:
  1. Negative: 50 out of 352
352 tv reviews
    • 55 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Tallerico
    The series premiere is the least funny episode, too reliant on setting up its characters and its world. Be patient. Once those are in place, and the writers and talent are allowed to have some fun, it works much better, and it’s the kind of show that gets more enjoyable as it goes along, revealing character through repeated jokes and just having more of a good time.
    • 71 Metascore
    • 80 Brian Tallerico
    Every part is well-performed, but the most-acclaimed veterans--Nighy, Goode, Treadaway--do somewhat steal the show. All three are, as they almost always are, reason enough to watch on their own. And you get a crackling mystery too.
    • 69 Metascore
    • 40 Brian Tallerico
    Too much of Lodge 49 feels almost defiantly undercooked, like it’s trying too hard to capture a laidback SoCal vibe and purposefully avoiding structure and momentum. With so much television out there that even critics can’t keep up with all of it, there’s just not a compelling enough reason to check into Lodge 49.
    • 87 Metascore
    • 100 Brian Tallerico
    These first three episodes--all that were available to press--are masterful displays of the subtle impact of tragedy on behavior, all against the backdrop of an increasingly-heated drug war that we know will eventually help turn Jimmy into Saul.
    • 75 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Tallerico
    Some of the storytelling feels less refined than last year--people often sound like they’re over-explaining everything or verbalizing every question flitting through their minds when more subtlety would make for more effective drama--but the cast is again strong enough that The Sinner could again be an addictive summer distraction right when we need it.
    • 66 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Tallerico
    While “Dark Tourist” may not quite be “No Reservations” yet, the best parts of it reflect that curiosity about life outside the bubble, and this is not just a culinary bubble but a safety one.
    • 94 Metascore
    • 80 Brian Tallerico
    While all five episodes are connected by this question of diversity in education, the running time allows for a great array of personal stories as well. We see tryouts for poetry slam, cheerleader practice, several English classes, and so on. The result is that you end up, relatively quickly, at least by episode three, really rooting for the kids and teachers chosen to be highlighted by James’ camera.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 88 Brian Tallerico
    Beautifully constructed by Vallée and Noxon, and unforgettably performed by an ensemble that seems destined for awards ceremony stages in the near future, this is a worthy follower to “The Night Of” and “Big Little Lies” in this new trend of HBO Mini-Series Obsessions.
    • 84 Metascore
    • 100 Brian Tallerico
    [Stephen Frears] does his best work in over a decade. ... He brings the absolute best out of Hugh Grant and Ben Whishaw, who give riveting performances in the telling of one of the U.K.’s most shocking political scandals. This is a must-see.
    • 85 Metascore
    • 90 Brian Tallerico
    A trio of performances that I thought were good enough in season one to warrant Emmy nominations from Alison Brie, Betty Gilpin and Marc Maron are even better in season two. Looking at the season as a whole, it’s easy to pick out a few subplots that don’t work, but they're easy to ignore on a good show that's only gotten better. ... It’s one of TV’s best comedies.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 60 Brian Tallerico
    The first three episodes of Strange Angel often feel a bit too much like a slow burn, waiting to get to the “good stuff.” Having said that, it’s a reasonably engaging slow burn.
    • 92 Metascore
    • 100 Brian Tallerico
    It’s a must-watch for anyone interested in true crime shows as it’s not only a fascinating case on its own but really the template for so much that’s on television and streaming services today.
    • 70 Metascore
    • 80 Brian Tallerico
    It’s off to a more interesting start than several recent HBO shows (I’m looking at you, “Here and Now”) and the pedigree of the cast and crew should keep the production engaging. We’ve always loved to watch the high and mighty fall in fiction, and seeing the Roys collapse under the weight of their own underhanded machinations should make for an unexpected summer diversion.
    • 42 Metascore
    • 30 Brian Tallerico
    The premiere is notably manipulative, playing off the inherent empathy for children in jeopardy and the desire to see dead loved ones. It feels cheap and unearned, and just no fun.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Tallerico
    Overall, it’s more coherent and consistent than season four (at least the seven episodes I’ve seen) even if it’s not as inspired as the prime of the series. We need to start coming to terms with the realization that it won’t ever be quite that transcendent again, but this season is still often pretty funny.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 60 Brian Tallerico
    Picnic at Hanging Rock is a project that works better at the length of a feature film than a six-hour series. In the mid-section of the season, scenes start to feel overheated, as if the producers are worried that you’re starting to get bored (you probably are). Memorable performances and solid production values just don’t matter if a narrative sags.
    • 80 Metascore
    • 80 Brian Tallerico
    The series as a whole is not without its flaws, but it’s definitely worth watching for what Cumberbatch brings to it.
    • 89 Metascore
    • 90 Brian Tallerico
    The season does sag a bit around 206-7, but it’s forgivable given how fascinatingly it ends, with a series of episodes that are moving, funny, and brilliant.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 80 Brian Tallerico
    It loses its footing sometimes (it did in year one, too), but this is still smart television with film-caliber production values and incredible performances. Sometimes the writing can call a bit too much attention to itself, but the writers are smart enough in season two to avoid piling more puzzles on top of the ones they created in season one.
    • 58 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Tallerico
    There’s nothing particularly challenging here narratively, and the series starts on some rocky terrain before it finds its footing, but this is high-caliber escapism, the kind of well-done show that develops a propulsive rhythm as you get to know the Robinson family.
    • 51 Metascore
    • 30 Brian Tallerico
    It’s another case of a show that wouldn’t really work without its high concept, and the desperation its writers display reveals an awareness of that fact that sinks it.
    • 76 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Tallerico
    The Terror takes its time a bit too leisurely on occasion and likely would have been stronger at eight episodes, or maybe even six, but it’s a solid addition to this new trend of TV literary adaptations.
    • 77 Metascore
    • 80 Brian Tallerico
    The breakneck pacing of the end of season two can’t be maintained (and we wouldn't want it to be), but the characters have arguably grown even richer and more complex as the team behind this show explores how its two power players respond when that power is stripped away by the systems around them.
    • 83 Metascore
    • 100 Brian Tallerico
    One of the best new comedies of the last few years. This clever surprise is an eight-episode series that starts strongly and only gets better as its plot becomes more brilliantly complex and its characters are more fully developed. And it’s a wonderful showcase for Bill Hader’s dry sense of humor.
    • 46 Metascore
    • 30 Brian Tallerico
    It’s a show that’s constantly trying to push buttons but mistakes “ugly” for “intense.” They’re not the same thing. Not even close. Deyn is actually good here, but Sturgess can’t sell the tough cop thing to save his life. He’s just miscast. Worst of all, Hard Sun is just so generic beneath its high concept.
    • 74 Metascore
    • 80 Brian Tallerico
    Every time The Looming Tower threatens to spin off into melodrama completely, the cast (and talented directors) find a way to ground it. Ultimately, The Looming Tower is a dissection of incompetence, and how lack of communication and teamwork led to an international tragedy. It’s just complicated enough to feel historically accurate but not to push out viewers. In that sense, it balances historical commentary with what we still need from television most of all, whether it’s on cable or Hulu: entertainment.
    • 97 Metascore
    • 100 Brian Tallerico
    What I find most remarkable about Atlanta is the tonal balance and the confidence, something Glover has always displayed as an artist. Earn Marks may not be that confident in his life, but it takes an amazingly assured creative voice to calibrate comedy, drama, and social satire to such perfect degrees on shows like this one. In just three episodes, there is a typical season’s worth of character, commentary, and humor. I can’t wait to see more.
    • 67 Metascore
    • 70 Brian Tallerico
    Unsolved is a surprisingly entertaining watch. It’s not as thematically dense as “ACS” but it’s incredibly watchable--I busted through the seven episodes sent for review in a sitting and was totally engaged. Watching in a single chunk reveals some tonal inconsistencies and the structure of the show will be too frustrating for some viewers--there are also some regrettable decisions to soften the rappers’ realities to heighten their legacies--but the performances here are uniformly strong and the mystery around these two murders remains fascinating all these years later.
    • 68 Metascore
    • 60 Brian Tallerico
    There’s a solid, more consistent and shorter version of Seven Seconds within the 10-episode version premiering this week. It’s up to you if you have the time to find it.
    • 62 Metascore
    • 80 Brian Tallerico
    Sometimes the tones clash with each other--although less so as the show goes on--but it’s the grounded performances that keep it connected to something sweet and genuine.

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